Be sure to see additional Civil War Images under Stereos, Tintypes, Daguerreotypes, Ambrotypes, and Large Albumen Images.
Other Civil War-related CDVs are listed on the Political CDV page.

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CWCDV9.
H. Glosser, NY. Carte of standing bearded soldier.  Corners clipped. E. $50

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CWCDV31.
No ID. Cyrus R. Corliss, 15th New Hampshire Infantry. Residence Plymouth, NH; 25 years old. Enlisted on 9/8/1862 as a Corporal. On 10/8/1862 he mustered into “B” Co. NH 15th Infantry. He was mustered Out on 8/13/1863 at Concord, NH. Other Information: born in Plymouth, NH; died 9/28/1875 in Clinton, IA. (American Civil War Research Database). VG. $85

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CWCAB1. John C. Taylor, Hartford, Conn. Generals of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia-Portraits of Generals R.E. Lee, Longstreet, A.P. Hill, Ewell, Fitz Lee, Beauregard and Breckinridge, on one card. Great advertising piece on the back: “A gentleman living near Watkins’ Glen, New York, wrote me that he thought twenty-five cents each, too high a price for the stereoscopic war views, as he could buy views of Watkins’ Glen for $1.50 per dozen. I wrote him to this effect: if there was but one negative of Wakins’ Glen in existence, and if Watkins’ Glen itself was entirely wiped off the face of the earth, and if this one negative was old and “dense” and very slow to “print,” and if all the people of this country were as much interested in a view of Watkins’ Glen as they are in seeing the real scenes of our great war, so faithfully reproduced, then, and only under such circumstances, should Watkins’ Glen Pictures be compared to photographs made “at the front” during the days of 1861 to 1865.” Cabinet Card. VG. $95

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CWCDV73.
No ID. “R.R. Eshleman, Captain Foster’s Clerk,” written on verso. VG. $75


CWCDV79.
No ID. “Arthur A. Russell” written on bottom of card. This soldier is listed as a Private in the 10th Regiment NY Heavy Artillery, Co. A. VG. $175

     
CWCDV119.
Negative by Brady, published by E. Anthony. “Lieut. Gen. Beauregard, Chief Engineer of the Confederate States,” in manuscript on verso. With cut manuscript title from the album that contained this CDV. Corners trimmed. VG. $150

     
CWCDV126.
E&HT Anthony. “Joe Johnson C.S.A. Rebel Army,” in manuscript on verso. With cut manuscript title from the album that contained this CDV: “General Joe Johnson of the Confeder’t States Army.” VG. $175

     
CWCDV130.
Brady’s National Photographic Portrait Galleries, Washington, DC & NY. “Rear Admiral Foote, United States Navy the clearer of the Mississippi River,” in manuscript on verso. With cut manuscript title from the album that contained this CDV. Corners trimmed. VG. $150

     
CWCDV147.
Brady’s National Photographic Portrait Galleries, NY & Washington, DC. “Gen. Burnside,” in manuscript on verso. With cut manuscript title from the album that contained this CDV. Corners trimmed. VG. $100

  
CWCDV197.
Whitehurst Gallery, Washington, D.C. M.J. Powers, Photographer. This CDV came from an album of mostly NY and DC backmarks, including a number of Brady images. Beneath this image was written “S.L.M. died in a rebel prison.” The other notations written beneath images were all correct so the album appeared to be as found. VG. $125

  
CWCDV198.
Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E. Anthony. Major Gen’l Geo. B. McClellan. Brady’s 1861 copyright line on bottom recto. CDV. VG. $150

  
CWCDV205.
CDV of seated soldier with sword. Look like “12” on his hat. G. $125

     
CWCDV210.
Label on verso indicates “sold by Guille & Alles, New York. General Sigel CDV. VG. $125

     
CWCDV211.
E. Anthony from Negative from Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. CDV of General Wool. VG. $125

  
CWCDV218.
D. Appleton & Co., NY. President Jefferson Davis, Confederate States of America. CDV. VG. $125

  
CWCDV224.
A.K. Joslyn, ? Island, ? Harbor. I’ve been told this is [“Gallop’s Island, Boston Harbor.”] The large black stamp of James C. Magoun, 2d Reg’t Mass. H.A. obscures the location of this “Photographist’s” studio. Some spotting. G+. $200

        
CWCAB2.
Taylor & Huntington, Hartford, Conn. The War for the Union. Photographic History. This is a rare two-sided album card. On one side is No. 132. Officers’ Dinner Party. This view was taken at Headquarters Army of the Potomac, near Brandy Station, Va., April 7, 1864. The sitters are not identified. They are being served by a black young man. On the other side is No. 6258. Effect of Bombardment in Petersburg. This view shows the ruins at the Richmond & Petersburg R.R. Depot caused by the bombardment. The first image measures 3 1/4″ x 4.” The second image measures 3 3/8″ square. Two great images on this card. $750

     
CWCAB4.
M.B. Brady. Photo taken by James F. Gibson. Brady’s Album Gallery. No. 357. Group. Comte de Paris, Duc de Chartres, Prince de Joinville, and Friends, Camp Winfield Scott, near Yorktown, May 1, 1862. Brady’s 1862 copyright line on bottom recto. Card has the stamp of Snow & Roos, San Francisco in left margin and a label from Roos & Wunderlich, Depot of Goupil & Co., San Francisco on verso. See CWCDV203 above for a companion image taken the same day. VG. $450

     
CWCDV229.
Moulton & Larkin, Elmira, NY. “Rebel Pen,” in ink on verso. Great image of Union Prison camp with crowds of rebels in view. 2-cent cancelled revenue stamp on verso cancelled on Oct. 22, 1864. CDV. VG+ $650

  
CWCDV244.
No ID. General Nathaniel Lyon (1818-1861). Killed on Wilson’s Creek near Springfield, MO. VG. $165

     
CWCDV248.
Brady, published by Anthony. General George McClellan. G. $100

  
CWCDV249.
Bradley & Rulofson, published by J.C. Goodhue & Co. Gen. U.S. Grant. VG. $225

     
CWCDV253.
Rockwell & Co., NY. Dwight Chapman is ID’d on back in pencil. Kepi shows “34” and “G.” 34th Massachuesetts Infantry, wounded in action at Fishers Hill; Killed in action, Cedar Creek. Chapman’s cousin, Thomas Wagner mustered in on same date into 34th Mass. Co. G, was wounded on same day and killed on same day at Chapman. With complete National Archives Records on both men. VG. $250

     
CWCDV256.
M.B. Brady, copyright 1862. Brady’s Album Gallery. No. 400. Confederate, Now Federal Quartermaster’s Department, Yorktown. Black man with horse on left. VG. $375

     
CWCDV257.
Kimberly Bros. National Gallery, Fortress Monroe. Major John A. Darling, 3rd Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery. The image has a period identification from the original album of “Major Darling.” Official military records from the National Archives show he received his commission from the Governor of Pennsylvania and commanded the Post and Battery (Monroe) during March and April of 1863. Records show him present during July of 1863 when portion of Regiment ordered to Gettysburg. With complete National Archives Records as well as other material. Clipped corners. VG. $225

     
CWCDV258.
No ID. 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery Lieutenant Elisha Benjamin Andrews (1844-1917), Wounded in Action, Petersburg (partially blinded); later became President of Brown University (1889-1908). Cancelled, 2-cent revenue stamp on back. CDV has been clipped at corners and trimmed at bottom. With information from the American Civil War Research Database and additional supporting documentation. G. $275

     
CWCDV259.
Warren, Cambridgeport, Mass. Officer Charles H. Manning, United States Navy. Period ID on back of card. Assistant Engineer 1863 with promotions and with Naval Service until 1884. Navy records from the National Archives has Manning on the Union Steam Vessel Mary Sanford. Also served on other CW vessels. With records from archives and copy of pages from List of Officers of the Navy of the United States and of the Marine Corps from 1775 to 1900 related to Manning. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $200

     
CWCDV263.
Brady/Anthony. General Nathaniel P. Banks. VG. $150

     
CWCDV265.
Case & Getchell, Boston. General Nathaniel P. Banks.  VG. $125

     
CWCDV266.
Brady/Anthony. General Burnside. Tinted. VG. $165

     
CWCDV270.
Brady/Anthony. Major General John G. Foster (1823-1874).
John Gray Foster was a career military officer in the US Army; his most distinguished services were in North and South Carolina. A postbellum expert in underwater demolition, he wrote the definitive treatise on the subject.

Foster was born in Whitefield, New Hampshire. When he was ten, his family moved to Nashua, where he attended the local schools before enrolling in the Hancock Academy. He graduated from West Point in 1846 fourth in his class and served as an engineer during the Mexican-American War. He served under Winfield Scott and was severely wounded at the Battle of Molino del Rey. He won two brevet promotions for bravery. After the war, Foster returned to West Point as an instructor. In 1858 he was on engineering duty in Charleston Harbor, where he helped in the construction of Fort Sumter.

Promoted to captain of U.S. engineers, Foster was in command of the garrison at Fort Moultrie when the Civil War began. He immediately transferred his small force to Fort Sumter and became second-in-command to Major Robert Anderson during the Battle of Fort Sumter. Foster was appointed a brigadier general of volunteers on October 23, 1861, and commanded the 1st Brigade in Ambrose Burnside‘s North Carolina Expedition. He was conspicuous in action at the battles of Roanoke Island and New Bern. After the Battle of Roanoke Island, the Confederate Fort Bartow was renamed Fort Foster in honor of General Foster.

After General Burnside was transferred to Virginia, Foster assumed command of the Department of North Carolina. He was promoted to major general of volunteers on 18 July, 1862, and led the Goldsboro Expedition. During James Longstreet‘s Tidewater Campaign, upon hearing of a planned Confederate attack on Washington, North Carolina, Foster personally assumed command of the defenses there. When Daniel H. Hill demanded the surrender of Washington, Foster defiantly replied, “If you want Washington, come and get it”. Hill’s forces besieged the garrison and two Union relief expeditions were turned back. Foster escaped the besieged city in order to personally lead a relief column back. Hill withdrew his forces shortly afterwards however. In December, Foster won a strategically important fight at the Battle of Goldsboro Bridge, resulting in the destruction of an important railroad bridge on a vital Confederate supply line.

In 1863, Foster was sent to Tennessee to assume command of the Department of the Ohio and its corresponding Army of the Ohio. He was in command only for a short time before he was badly injured in a fall from his horse. Upon his recovery, he took command of the Department of the South and aided in the surrender of Savannah, Georgia. He was making preparations for the surrender of Charleston, but his wounds forced him to relinquish command to Quincy A. Gilmore. Foster was placed in command of the Department of Florida at the end of the war, receiving a promotion to the rank of major general in both the volunteer service and the Regular Army (the latter being a brevet rank).

After the war, Foster remained in the army, being promoted to lieutenant colonel of engineers in 1867. He was involved in military and underwater surveying and became an expert in underwater demolition, publishing a definitive manual on the subject in 1869 that became the acknowledged reference work. From 1871 until 1874, he was assistant to the Chief of Engineers in Washington D.C. His final post was a superintendent of the Harbor of Refuge on Lake Erie.

Foster died in 1874 in Nashua, New Hampshire, and was buried there.

The John G. Foster Post #7 of the Grand Army of the Republic in Nashua was named in his honor. In 1900, Fort Foster in Maine was named in his memory. It is preserved as a park.

Reference: Eicher, John H. & David J., Civil War High Commands, Stanford University Press, 2001.

VG. $250

     
CWCDV271.
Brady, NY. Major General Israel Bush Richardson.

Israel Bush Richardson (December 26, 1815 November 3, 1862) was a United States Army officer during the Mexican-American War and Civil War, where he was a major general in the Union Army. Nicknamed “Fighting Dick” for his prowess on the battlefield, he was mortally wounded at the Battle of Antietam near Sharpsburg, Maryland.

Richardson was born in Fairfax, Vermont. He was reportedly a descendant of famed American Revolutionary War general Israel Putnam. He was appointed from Vermont to the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York. He graduated 38th out of 58 cadets in the Class of 1841. He was one of 23 classmates that would become generals during the Civil War. After some routine assignments, Richardson served as a second lieutenant in the Second Seminole War in Florida.

He received two brevets for meritorious service during the Mexican-American War; to captain and major for the actions at Contreras, Churubusco, and Chapultepec. It was in Mexico while serving under General Winfield Scott in the Army of Occupation that he received his nickname, “Fighting Dick,” which would carry over to the Civil War.

He later served as a captain in the 3rd U.S. Infantry (a rank he achieved in 1851) at various frontier outposts, but resigned his commission in 1855 and began farming near Pontiac, Michigan.

When the Civil War broke out, Richardson was still farming in Michigan. He enlisted in the Union Army and recruited and organized the 2nd Michigan Infantry. He married Fannie Travor on May 18, 1861, in Wayne County, Michigan. When he reported with his regiment in Washington, D.C., General Winfield Scott greeted him with “I’m glad to have my ‘Fighting Dick’ with me again.” Promoted to brigadier general of volunteers in late spring; dating from May 17, 1861, Richardson was assigned command of the 4th Brigade, 1st Division, in the newly organized army of Irvin McDowell. His brigade saw limited action at the First Battle of Bull Run near Blackburn’s Ford, and in covering the subsequent Federal withdrawal to Washington.

He commanded several brigades in the Army of the Potomac and then the 1st Division of the II Corps during the Peninsula Campaign in mid-1862. He was involved in the fighting at the battles of Yorktown, Seven Pines, and the Seven Days. He was particularly distinguished in sharp fighting near the Chickahominy River. Following the campaign, he was promoted to major general on July 4, 1862. He led his troops during the Northern Virginia Campaign, fighting at the Second Battle of Bull Run, and again during the Maryland Campaign in September, when he was engaged at South Mountain.

Richardson’s 1st Division played a key role during the Battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862, attacking Confederate positions in the center of the Sunken Road in support of the 3rd Division of Maj. Gen. William H. French. After stubborn fighting, by 1:00 p.m., Richardson had gained control of the high ground in front of the apex of the defensive line, and his men enfiladed the remaining defenders in the road, which would gain the nickname “Bloody Lane” for the carnage. Richardson pushed forward beyond the road and was directing the fire of his artillery and organizing another attack when he was struck by a shell fragment.

Carried to the rear, Richardson was treated at a field hospital. His wound was not considered life threatening, and he was given a room in McClellan’s headquarters, the Pry House. President Abraham Lincoln paid his respects to the wounded Richardson during a visit to the battlefield in October. However, infection set in, and then pneumonia, which claimed the life of the popular general in early November. He was among six generals to be killed or mortally wounded at Antietam.

His body was escorted to Detroit, Michigan. Large crowds lined the streets during his funeral procession to nearby Pontiac, where he was buried in Oak Hill Cemetery.

Fort Richardson, a Texas frontier fort active from 1867 to 1878, was named for him.

The Israel B. Richardson Camp #2 of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War in Oakland, Michigan, was also named for the fallen general.

Card mount has been trimmed at sides and top corners clipped. Image is VG. $325

     
CWCDV278.
Washburn, New Orleans.  James W. Fee – Co. B, 99th Ill. Inf. Id’ed from another copy of the same image on David Parks’ website which has a period ink ID on reverse and photographers backmark of Washburn – New Orleans. Fee was mustered in on 8/23/62 and mustered out on an unknown date. He was promoted to Captain on 12/24/62. He lived in Perry, Illinois. G. $85

     
CWCDV280.
Brady, NY. Unidentified Civil War soldier. VG. $95

     
CWCDV282.
Brady, NY. Unidentified seated Civil War soldier. VG. $100

     
CWCDV303.
S. Bruckner, Yonkers, NY. Unidentified officer, 17th Infantry. VG. $100

     
CWCDV304.
T.M. Schleier, Nashville, Tennessee. Unidentified officer posed before backdrop with a camp scene. VG. $100

     
CWCDV307.
J. Gurney & Son. Col. Elmer E. Ellsworth. Verso presents the mysterious text of several letters, one from a friend of Ellsworth’s, one from Ellsworth himself (apparently after his death!), and one from J. Gurney & Son. VG. $225

     
CWCDV314.
Brady, NY. Unidentified enlisted man. VG. $125

     
CWCDV322.
Davis Brothers, Portsmouth (NH). Manuscript on verso “Web? August 1862.” This infantry man looks like he has a “K” on his cap and several other letters than a “V.” VG. $125

     
CWCDV330. Brown, Easton, Pa. CDV of a tall, bearded soldier with rifle with bayonet. VG. $195

     
CWCDV388. Photographic Negative from Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General Daniel Tyler (1799-1882). He became colonel of the 1st Conn. infantry in April, 1861, brigadier-general of volunteers in March, 1862 and served in the Army of the Mississippi at the siege of Corinth, was one of the commission, to investigate Buell’s Kentucky campaign, and afterward was in command at Harper’s Ferry, in Baltimore and in Delaware.  He withdrew from the army in April, 1864. Trimmed at bottom o/w E. $200

     
CWCDV389.
Photographic Negative from Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General James Brewerton Ricketts (1817-1887). His early service in the Civil war was in the defenses of Washington and he commanded a battery in the capture of Alexandria.  He distinguished himself in the battle of Bull Run, where he was wounded and taken prisoner.  For his gallantry on this occasion he was breveted lieutenant-colonel and commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers, and after being confined as a prisoner of war and being absent on sick leave, he returned to duty in June, 1862, and commanded a division in the Army of Virginia during the Northern Virginia campaign, where he participated in the battles of second Bull Run and Cedar mountain and in the actions at Rappahannock station and Thoroughfare gap He also commanded a division in the Maryland campaign, taking part in the battles of South mountain and Antietam, was promoted major in the regular army, June 1, 1863, and commanded the 3d division, 6th army corps, under Gen. Grant in the Richmond campaign, where he was engaged in the Wilderness, at Spottsylvania and Cold Harbor, and in the siege of Petersburg.  He was brevetted colonel for gallantry at Cold Harbor, and in the defense of Maryland against Gen. Early’s raid commanded the 3d division under Gen. Wallace at the battle of Monocacy.  He commanded the 3d division, 6th army corps, Army of the Shenandoah, at Opequan, Fisher’s hill, and Cedar creek, Va., and was severely wounded in the last named battle.  Gen. Ricketts was brevetted major-general of volunteers, Aug. 1, 1864. and on March 13, 1865 he was brevetted brigadier-general in the regular army for gallant and meritorious services in the battle of Cedar creek, and major-general U. S. A. for gallant and meritorious services in the field during the war. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). Trimmed at bottom o/w E. $350

     
CWCDV390.
Photographic Negative from Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General Montgomery Cunningham Meigs (1816-1892). Meigs was born in Augusta, Ga. May 3, 1816.  He was graduated at the United States military academy in 1836 and assigned to the artillery; was transferred to the engineer corps in 1837; promoted 1st lieutenant in 1838, and in 1853 captain.  He was employed at first on Mississippi river surveys, and in 1839-41 was a member of the board of engineers for Atlantic coast line defenses.  He was subsequently superintending engineer successively in the building of Forts Delaware, Wayne, Porter and Ontario, and at Montgomery.  From 1852-60 he planned and constructed the aqueduct from Great Falls, Md., to Washington, D. C., and he superintended the building of the new wings and iron dome of the capitol extension, the extension of the United States post-office building and the repairs on Fort Madison, Md.  In April 1861, he was appointed chief engineer to organize and conduct the expedition for the relief of Fort Pickens, and in Oct. was sent to take charge of the building of Fort Jefferson. He was promoted colonel of the 11th infantry, May 14, 1865, and the next day was commissioned brigadier-general of staff and quartermaster-general of the United States army, the position he continued to hold until his retirement in 1882.  Gen. Meigs was engaged during the war in directing the equipment and supplies of the army in the field, generally from headquarters at Washington, but was present at the battle of Bull Run, engaged in the Chattanooga campaign, Nov., 1863, commanded Gen. Grant’s base of supplies at Belle Plain and Fredericksburg, May 16-18, 1864, and was sent on a special mission to Bermuda Hundred, May 21-26, 1864.  When the national capital was threatened, in July, 1864, he commanded a brigade of quartermaster’s employees.  He was brevetted major-general U.S.A., on July 5, 1864, for distinguished and meritorious services during the war.  He was stationed at Savannah, Ga., in Jan., 1865, equipping Gen. Sherman’s armies, and in March was sent to Goldsboro, directing the opening of communications for again supplying Sherman’s army.  After the war Gen. Meigs traveled in Europe, 1867-68, for his health, and again in 1875-76 to examine the organization of European armies as a member of the commission for reform and reorganization of the army. He was a member of the board to prepare plans for the new war department building in 1866; for the National museum in 1868; for the hall of records in 1878, and was architect of the building for the pension bureau.  He was retired from the army Feb. 6, 1882.  Gen. Meigs was a member of the board of regents for the Smithsonian institution and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.  He died in Washington, D. C., Jan. 2, 1892. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). Trimmed at bottom o/w E. $225

     
CWCDV392.
J.E. McClees, Artist, Philadelphia. William Farquhar Barry (1818-1879), brigadier-general, was born in New York City, Aug. 8, 1818; was graduated at West Point in 1838, and in that year assisted Maj. Ringgold to organize the first battery of light artillery formed in the United States army. He served in Mexico from 1846 to 1848, fighting at the Battle of Tampico, was stationed at Fort Henry from 1849 to 1851 and on July 1, 1852, was made captain of the 2nd artillery.  He served in the Seminole war in Florida and during the Kansas disturbances, and at the outbreak of the Civil War entered active service, assisting in the defense of Fort Pickens as major of light artillery. On Aug. 20, 1861, he was appointed brigadier-general of volunteers and took an active part in the Virginia peninsular campaign until Aug., 1862, fighting in all the important battles. From the end of the campaign until 1864 he was chief of artillery in the defenses of Washington, having been appointed lieutenant-colonel of the 1st artillery on Aug. 1, 1863.  In May 1863, he was assigned to the command at Pittsburg, Pa., and Wheeling, W. Va., against a threatened cavalry raid, and was, from March, 1864, to June 1860, chief of artillery on Gen. Sherman’s staff, taking part during this time in the siege of Atlanta.  During his service in the war he was given various brevet titles, culminating in that of brevet major-general, U. S. A., which was conferred on him March 13, 1865.  After the war he served on the northern frontier, then as commander of the artillery school of practice at Fortress Monroe, and as commandant at Fort Henry. He died in Fort McHenry, Baltimore, Md., July 18, 1879. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $200

     
CWCDV393.
E&HT Anthony, NY. Thomas John Wood (1823-1906), major-general, was born at Munfordville, Ky., Sept. 25, 1823.  He was graduated at the U. S. military academy in 1845 and was assigned to the topographical engineers, but requested a transfer to the 2nd dragoons, and on Dec. 2, 1846, was made a second lieutenant.  He served in the Mexican war, was subsequently aide-de-camp to Gen. Harney in Louisiana and Texas, and was adjutant of the 2nd dragoons until 1854.  He was appointed first lieutenant in 1854 and captain in the 1st cavalry in 1855.  He served in Kansas during the border troubles of 1856 and accompanied the Utah expedition under Albert Sidney Johnston in 1857.  0n March 16, 1861, he was promoted major, on May 9 lieutenant-colonel, in October brigadier-general of volunteers, and as such commanded a division in the Tennessee and Mississippi campaigns, being actively engaged in the battle of Shiloh and in the siege of Corinth. Later in the year he served under Gen. Buell in Kentucky; aided in the pursuit of the Confederate forces under Gen. Bragg; was promoted colonel of the 2nd cavalry on Nov. 12, and was one of a number of officers who were wounded in the battle of Stone’s River.  He commanded a division of the 21st corps, Army of the Cumberland, till Nov., 1863, and was engaged in the battles of Chickamauga and Missionary ridge. He also took part in the operations for the relief of Knoxville and in the invasion of Georgia, and received a severe wound in the engagement at Lovejoy’s Station in Sept., 1864.  He commanded the 4th corps during the battles of Franklin and Nashville and took part in pursuing the Confederate forces to the Tennessee River. In Jan., 1865, he was promoted major-general of volunteers and had command in Tennessee, Arkansas and Mississippi until Sept. 1, 1866, when he was mustered out of the volunteer service. He was brevetted first lieutenant, U. S. A., for gallant and meritorious conduct at the battle of Buena Vista, brigadier-general for bravery at Chickamauga, and major-general for distinguished service at Nashville.  Gen. Wood was retired from the service with the rank of major-general, June 9, 1868 (changed to brigadier-general by act of March 3, 1875).  He died at Dayton, Ohio, on Feb. 6, 1906. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $275

     
CWCDV394.
Photographic Negative from Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony, NY. Fitz-John Porter, major-general, was born in Portsmouth, N.  H., June 13, 1822, son of Commander John Porter of the United States navy.  He was graduated at the United States military academy in 1845 and assigned to the 4th artillery, becoming 1st lieutenant, May 29 1847.  He served creditably at Vera Cruz and Cerro Gordo, was brevetted captain for gallant and meritorious conduct at Molino del Rey and major for services at Chapultepec.  He was present also at the capture of the City of Mexico and was wounded at the Belen gate.  In the interval between the Mexican and Civil wars he served on garrison duty and as instructor at West Point became assistant adjutant-general with the rank of captain in 1856, and served during the troubles in Kansas and in the Utah expedition.  He was promoted colonel of the 15th infantry, May 14, 1861, and on May 17, was appointed brigadier-general of volunteers.  After taking part in the action of Falling Waters on July 2, Gen. Porter commanded a division in the defenses of Washington, 1861-62, and in the Virginia Peninsular campaign in the spring of I862, directing the siege of Yorktown, April 5 – May 4.  From May to August he commanded the 5th army corps, Army of the Potomac, and directed its operations in the battles of New bridge, Hanover Court House, Mechanicsville, Gaines’ mill, Turkey tavern, and Malvern hill.  He was promoted major-general of volunteers on July 4, having been brevetted brigadier-general U. S. A. on June 27 for gallantry at Chickahominy, was transferred to northern Virginia in August and commanded his corps under Pope at the second battle of Bull Run, subsequently protecting Washington by occupying the right bank of the Potomac. At Antietam he commanded the 5th army corps under McClellan, and on Sept. 19, he fought with his own troops along the battle of Shepherdstown and captured four guns.  He was relieved of his command in November, and was ordered to Washington to appear before a military commission and answer charges preferred against him by Gen. Pope.  A court-martial was subsequently ordered, the first order being revoked, and on Nov. 25 he was arrested, the charges against him being made known on Dec. 1.  He was charged with having failed to join Pope at Bristoe on the morning of Aug. 28, and with having disobeyed two orders at the second battle of Bull Run on Aug. 30, one to advance and the other to retreat. The court-martial found him guilty of the charges preferred, and he was cashiered Jan. 21, 1863, and “forever disqualified from holding any office of trust or profit under the government of the United States.”  The justice or injustice of the verdict was the subject of much controversy, and numerous appeals were subsequently made by Porter to have the case reopened. The clause providing that he should never again be permitted to hold office under the United States was remitted in 1882, and in 1885 President Arthur vetoed a bill which had passed both houses restoring him to his rank in the army, on the grounds that Congress lacked constitutional authority to pass such a bill.  In 1886, however, President Cleveland signed a similar bill, and he was re-appointed colonel, U. S. A., his commission dating from May 14, 1861. After leaving the army Gen. Porter was engaged in business in New York for a time; was superintendent of the construction of the New Jersey insane asylum, 1872-75; commissioner of public works in New York City, 1875-77; assistant receiver of the Central railroad of New Jersey, 1877-82; police commissioner of New York City, 1884-88; fire commissioner, 1888-89; and cashier of the New York postoffice, 1893-97.  He declined an offer made him by the Khedive of Egypt in 1869 to command his army with the rank of major-general. Gen. Porter died in Morristown, N. J., May 21, 1901. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). Outdoor CDV with flag, trimmed at bottom o/w E. $395

     
CWCDV395.
Photographic Negative from Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General Ricketts & Lady. James Brewerton Ricketts, brigadier-general, was born in New York City, June 21, 1817.  He was graduated at the United States military academy in 1839, served during the Canadian border disturbances, and took part in the Mexican war, where he was engaged in the battle of Monterey and held the Riconda pass during the battle of Buena Vista.  He was promoted captain in 1852, served in Florida against the Seminole Indians, and was then on frontier and garrison duty until the Civil war.  His early service in the Civil war was in the defenses of Washington and he commanded a battery in the capture of Alexandria.  He distinguished himself in the battle of Bull Run, where he was wounded and taken prisoner.  For his gallantry on this occasion he was breveted lieutenant-colonel and commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers, and after being confined as a prisoner of war and being absent on sick leave, he returned to duty in June, 1862, and commanded a division in the Army of Virginia during the Northern Virginia campaign, where he participated in the battles of second Bull Run and Cedar mountain and in the actions at Rappahannock station and Thoroughfare gap. He also commanded a division in the Maryland campaign, taking part in the battles of South mountain and Antietam, was promoted major in the regular army, June 1, 1863, and commanded the 3d division, 6th army corps, under Gen. Grant in the Richmond campaign, where he was engaged in the Wilderness, at Spottsylvania and Cold Harbor, and in the siege of Petersburg.  He was brevetted colonel for gallantry at Cold Harbor, and in the defense of Maryland against Gen. Early’s raid commanded the 3d division under Gen. Wallace at the battle of Monocacy. He commanded the 3d division, 6th army corps, Army of the Shenandoah, at Opequan, Fisher’s hill, and Cedar creek, Va., and was severely wounded in the last named battle. Gen. Ricketts was brevetted major-general of volunteers, Aug. 1, 1864. and on March 13, 1865 he was brevetted brigadier-general in the regular army for gallant and meritorious services in the battle of Cedar creek, and major-general U. S. A. for gallant and meritorious services in the field during the war. After the close of hostilities he commanded a district in Virginia until April 30, 1866 when he was mustered out of the volunteer service. He was retired from active service in the regular army, Jan. 3, 1867, with the rank of major-general, for disability incurred from wounds received in battle, and he died in Washington, D. C., Sept. 27, 1887. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). Trimmed at bottom o/w E. $475

     
CWCDV396.
Photographic Negative from Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony, NY. Colonel Rush Christopher Hawkins (1831-1920) of the 9th NY Volunteer Infantry, “Hawkins Zouaves.” Hawkins was wounded in action at Camden, North Carolina. “Hawkins Zouaves” suffered their greatest casualties at the Battle of Antietam. Trimmed at bottom o/w E. $750

     
CWCDV397.
Photographic Negative from Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony, NY. George Armstrong Custer (1839-1876), major-general, was born in New Rumley, Harrison county, Ohio, Dec. 5, 1839, and was graduated at West Point in 1861.  Being assigned to duty as 2nd lieutenant in the 1st U. S. cavalry, he arrived at the front on the day of the first battle of Bull Run and joined his regiment on the field. In the fall of 1861 he was ordered home on sick leave, and on his return, in Feb., 1862, he rejoined the army, being assigned to the 5th U. S. cavalry.  He served successively as aide on the staffs of Gens. Phil Kearny, W. F. Smith and George B. McClellan, was promoted to be a captain of volunteers and served throughout the Peninsular campaign of 1862.  He was commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers in June, 1863, and placed at the head of a brigade of Michigan cavalry, which, under his leadership, became one of the best trained and most efficient bodies in the Federal army.  He led his brigade at the battle of Gettysburg, and distinguished himself by gallantry which won for him the brevet rank of major in the regular army. Subsequently his brigade was attached to Sheridan’s cavalry corps, with which he served in the campaigns in Virginia, in the spring and summer of 1864, and in the subsequent operations in the Shenandoah valley, distinguishing himself by his bravery on numerous occasions.  He was then given command of the 3d division of Sheridan’s corps, won the battle of Woodstock, and at Cedar creek his division recaptured, before the day was over, guns and colors that had been taken from the army earlier in the fight, together with Confederate flags and cannon.  After this brilliant success, Gen. Custer was sent to Washington in charge of the captured colors, and was recommended for promotion.  He was given the brevet of major-general of volunteers, Oct. 19, 1864, defeated Gen. Early at Waynesboro, and took part in the battles of Five Forks, Dinwiddie Court House, and other engagements of Grant’s last campaign.  He received the first flag of truce from the Army of Northern Virginia, and was present at Appomattox Court House when Lee surrendered his army. He was appointed major-general of volunteers to date from April 15, 1865, having been brevetted major-general, U. S. A., March 13, 1865, and, after the grand review at Washington, commanded the cavalry in Texas in the winter of 1865 and 1866, and then applied for leave of absence to become commander of the cavalry which Juarez was organizing to drive the Emperor Maximilian out of Mexico. His request being denied, he accepted the position of lieutenant-colonel of the 7th cavalry and gained his first experience in Indian fighting in 1867-68, with Gen. Hancock’s campaign against the Cheyennes, bringing the campaign to a successful conclusion by a decisive defeat which he inflicted on the Indians at Washita, I. T., in Nov., 1868. He first met the hostile Sioux in 1873, when his regiment was ordered to Dakota to guard the Northern Pacific railroad construction, and in 1874 he commanded an expedition to the Black Hills which opened up a hitherto undiscovered region of mineral wealth. Gen.Custer lost his life, June 25, 1876, at the fatal massacre on the Little Big Horn. Reaching the Indian encampment in a region which was little known, he did not wait for the rest of the army, under command of Gen. Terry, and, underestimating the strength of the Indians, divided his force of 277 troopers into three divisions, with which he made the attack. The Indians, outnumbering their opponents ten to one, killed every one of the soldiers. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). Trimmed at bottom o/w E. $1200

     
CWCDV398.
J. Gurney & Son, NY. Colonel Luigi (Louis) Palma di Cesnola (1832-1904); born to an ancient, ennobled Italian family di Cesnola had a glittering military reputation at the beginning of the Civil War. His father had fought for Napoleon. di Cesnola was educated at the Royal Military Academy at Turin, and entered the mounted arm of the Sardinian army. At age seventeen, the young count fought against powerful Austrian armies in Italy’s war for independence. He also fought in the Crimea in the late 1850s. Finally, in 1860, di Cesnola immigrated to the United States, settling in New York. He married the daughter of an American naval officer and served as the director of a 700-student military school in New York. With the coming of war, he offered his services to the 11th New York Infantry, and received a commission as major as a result of his prior military service. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in 1862, before accepting an appointment as colonel of the 4th New York Cavalry. However, in February 1863, the dashing count was dismissed from the service for allegedly stealing six pistols, but he was exonerated, reinstated, and returned to his regiment.

di Cesnola was a loyal McClellan man, something that did not stand him well with either the administration or with the army’s high command. In late May, a few days after Maj. Gen. George Stoneman, the commander of the Army of the Potomac’s Cavalry Corps, took medical leave, di Cesnola complained to a friend that he was overlooked and should have been put in command.

In the aftermath of the June 9, 1863 Battle of Brandy Station, Brig. Gen. Alfred Pleasonton, now commanding the Cavalry Corps, placed di Cesnola under arrest for moving some of his men through an infantry camp while on the way to the front. At the June 17, 1863 Battle of Aldie, di Cesnola led his men into battle without any weapons, and in spite of the fact that his arrest meant that he had no command authority. As a result of di Cesnola’s valiant conduct, Col. Judson Kilpatrick, di Cesnola’s brigade commander, asked Pleasonton to release the count from arrest, and Pleasonton agreed. Di Cesnola was awarded the Medal of Honor for his valor that day, something that undoubtedly rankled Pleasonton a great deal. di Cesnola suffered serious combat wounds and was captured and sent to Richmond’s notorious Libby Prison.

di Cesnola had a fascinating career after the Civil War. At the end of the war, he published an account of his time as a prisoner of war in Libby Prison. In 1865, di Cesnola, now a naturalized American citizen, was appointed consul general to Lanarca, Cyprus, while the island was occupied by the Ottoman Empire. He remained there until 1876, illegally acquiring a large collection of antiquities taken from Cypriot tombs that he removed to the United States. He wrote a well-regarded book about his excavations and archaeological studies of the island, and his vast collection of nearly 5,000 items is on display in Harvard University’s Semitic Museum. He also wrote a lengthy description of the collection when it was placed on display. The count sold his collection to the new Metropolitan Museum in New York, and then became the museum’s first director in 1879, a position that he held until his death on November 21, 1904, at the age of seventy-two. di Cesnola’s excavations remain an unhappy chapter in the history of Cyprus, which still views the collection as property of the State of Cyprus. He was buried in Kensico Cemetery in Valhalla, West Chester County, New York. More than one hundred years after his death, Cypriots often view the Italian count as a grave robber. Trimmed at bottom o/w E. $375

     
CWCDV399.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E. Anthony, NY. Col. Michael Corcoran and staff of the Gallant 69th NY Infantry. Trimmed at left. VG. $1500

     
CWCDV400.
E&HT Anthony, NY. General Michael Corcoran (1827-1863), brigadier-general, was born in Carrowkeel, Ireland, Sept. 21, 1827.  His father, a captain in the British army, gave him a good education, and procured for him a commission in the Irish constabulary in 1845. This he resigned, being unwilling to oppress his people and in 1849 he emigrated to America, locating in New York. He joined the militia there as a private, rose through the grades to the rank of colonel, 1859, and when Prince Albert of Wales visited this country, he refused to order out the regiment, the 69th, to do honor to the prince. For this he was subjected to trial by court-martial, that was still pending when the Civil war began. Upon the first call for troops, he led the 69th to the seat of war, and, being ordered to Virginia built Fort Corcoran on Arlington Heights, and then led it into the battle of Bull Run, where he fought with impetuous gallantry. He was wounded and captured, and spent nearly a year in various Confederate prisons, refusing to accept a release conditional upon his promise not to take up arms again in defense of the Union. Upon being exchanged, Aug. 15, 1862, he was commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers to date from July 21, 1861, and organized the Corcoran legion, which he commanded in the battles on the James, near Suffolk, in April, 1863, and in checking the advance of the Confederates upon Norfolk. The legion was attached to the Army of the Potomac, in Aug., 1863, and Gen. Corcoran was killed by the falling of his horse upon him while riding in company with Gen. Thomas Francis Meagher, Dec. 22, 1863. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $250

     
CWCDV401.
Photographic negative from Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E. Anthony, NY. General Sanford & Staff. Col., Additional Aide-de-Camp, U.S.V., Brevet Brig. Gen. U.S.V. March 13 1865. Slight trim at left o/w E. $350

     
CWCDV403.
E. Anthony, NY. General McClellan and Staff. From left to right, Captain Clark, General McClellan, Captain Van Vliet, and Major Barry. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $300

     
CWCDV404.
Photographic negative from Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E. Anthony, NY. Colonel Wentworth, Colonel Lyon, Captain Varian, 8th Regiment NY Infantry. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $400

     
CWCDV405.
J. Gurney & Son, NY. Hickscher, Clitz & Vannsalaer, 12th US Infantry. Henry Boynton Clitz was born in Sackett’s Harbor, New York on July 4, 1824. He attended West Point from 1841 until 1845 and entered the service on July 1, 1845 as 2nd Lieutenant in the 7th U. S. Infantry. He was transferred as 2nd Lieutenant to the 3rd U. S. Infantry on September 21, 1846. He was brevetted to the rank of 1st Lieutenant for gallant service in the Mexican War. He attained the rank of Captain on December 6, 1858. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Clitz was a Major in the 12th U. S. Infantry. He was brevetted the rank of Lt. Colonel on June 27, 1862 for meritorious service in the Battle of Gaines’s Mill, Virginia, where he was wounded and taken prisoner. He was exchanged and during the period of his recovery, was appointed Commandant of West Point. He became Colonel of the 6th U. S. Infantry and was brevetted the rank of Brigadier General on March 13, 1865. After the war, he rose to the full rank of General and was Commanding Officer of several different garrisons. In 1880, he returned to Detroit, his boyhood home, and was made Commandant of Fort Wayne. General Clitz retired at the age of 61 after 44 years in the Army. Henry Clitz disappeared on October 31, 1888 at Niagara Falls. It is assumed that he drowned but his body was never recovered. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $400

     
CWCDV406.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. Major-General William Buel Franklin (1823-1903) was born in York, Pa. Feb. 27, 1823, and was graduated at the United States military academy at West Point, first in his class, in 1843. He served in the Mexican war as topographical engineer under Gen. Taylor, and so distinguished himself at the battle of Buena Vista as to win promotion to the brevet rank of 1st lieutenant. In the years between the Mexican war and the Civil war he was employed on topographical duty on the frontier, as engineer-secretary of the light-house board, assistant professor of engineering at West Point and supervising engineer in the construction of additions to the national capitol including the new Capitol Dome and in the erection of the treasury and post office buildings in Washington, D. C., rising in this interval also to the rank of captain, July 1, 1857. When the Civil war broke out he was promoted colonel of the 12th infantry, May 14, 1861, brigadier-general of volunteers, May 17, 1861, and major-general of volunteers, July 4, 1862. Gen. Franklin’s first service in the volunteer army was at Bull Run, July 21, 1861, when he commanded a brigade and engaged in the heaviest fighting of the day around the Henry house. He received a division on the organization of the Army of the Potomac and when the 6th army corps was formed became its commander, continuing as such throughout the year 1862. He was in almost all the battles of the Peninsula, engaging at Yorktown, West Point, White Oak bridge, Savage Station, Malvern hill and Harrison’s landing, and, after his return to Maryland with the army, commanded the left of the army at Crampton’s gap, South mountain, Sept. 14, 1862, and engaged in the battle of Antietam three days later. At the battle of Fredericksburg he commanded the left grand division under Burnside. Gen. Burnside, by complaining that Franklin did not obey orders in this battle caused the latter to be sharply censured by the Congressional committee on the conduct of the war, and he was also removed from his command for insubordination. The failure of the president to approve the order of removal led to Burnside’s resignation of his command. After several months on waiting orders Gen. Franklin returned to duty in July, 1863, and on Aug. 15, was assigned to command the 19th army corps, which he directed under Banks in the Red River expedition of 1864. He was wounded at the battle of Sabine crossroads, April 8, 1864, and was on sick leave until Dec. 2, 1864, when he was placed on duty as president of the retiring board at Wilmington, Del., in which capacity he served until Nov. 9, 1865. During his leave, while still an invalid, he was captured by Confederate raiders while riding on a train of the Baltimore & Philadelphia road, but made his escape the same night. He was given the brevet rank of brigadier-general, June 30, 1862, for gallant and meritorious service in the battles before Richmond, and brevet major-general U. S. A.  March 13, 1865 for gallant and meritorious services in the field during the war. He resigned from the regular army March 15, 1866, as colonel of the 12th infantry. He was adjutant-general of Connecticut 1877-78, was for several years president of the board of managers for the National home for disabled soldiers, and was interested in the manufacture of fire arms, was general manager of Colt Firearms, and a director of three insurance companies. Gen. Franklin died March 8, 1903. Trimmed at bottom. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). VG. $275

     
CWCDV408.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Major-General John Pope (1822-1892) was born in Louisville, Ky., March 16, 1822; was graduated at the United States military academy and appointed a brevet second lieutenant of topographical engineers in 1842; was promoted second lieutenant May 9, 1846, first lieutenant March 3, 1853, captain July 1, 1856, brigadier-general July 14, 1862, major-general Oct. 26, 1882, and was retired March 16, 1886. In the volunteer service he was commissioned brigadier-general May 17, 1861, promoted major-general March 21, 1862, and was mustered out Sept. 1, 1866. During his military career he was brevetted first lieutenant Sept. 23, 1846, for gallant conduct in the several conflicts at Monterey; captain, Feb. 23, 1847, for services at the battle of Buena Vista , and major-general, March 13, 1865, for services at the capture of Island No. 10. His early service included duty in Florida in 1842-44, in the survey of the boundary between the United States and the British provinces, and in the Mexican war. He was in charge of an exploring expedition in Minnesota in 1849, and proved that the Red River of the North could be navigated by steamers, on engineering service in New Mexico in 1851-53; and had charge of the survey of the route for the Pacific Railroad near the thirty-second parallel in 1853-59. In 1861 he was one of the officers detailed by the war department to escort President-elect Lincoln to Washington. His first service in the Civil War was as commander of the District of northern Missouri, from which he was transferred successively to the southwestern and the central districts, and on Dec. 18, 1861, he gained a victory over Gen. Sterling Price at Blackwater, and forced the Confederates to retreat below the Osage river. His next detail was as commander of the land forces that cooperated with Admiral Foote in the operations against New Madrid and Island No. 10, on the Mississippi. After the occupation of Corinth he was transferred from the command of the Army of the Mississippi to that of the Army of Virginia, and for fifteen days in Aug. 1862, he fought a greatly superior force of Confederates, under Gen. Lee, at Bristoe Station, Groveton, Manassas Junction, Gainesville and Germantown, and then fell back to Washington. On Sept. 3 he asked to be relieved of his command, and soon afterward was appointed to the command of the Department of the Northwest. He proved efficient in checking the hostilities of the Indians in Minnesota, and held that command till 1865, when he was transferred to the military division of the Missouri, subsequently the Department of Missouri. In Jan., 1866, he was relieved of this command; in 1867-68 commanded the third military district, organized under the Reconstruction act of Congress, comprising the states of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia; in 1868-70 the Department of the Lakes, in 1870-84 the Department of the Missouri, and from 1884 till his retirement the Department of the Pacific. He died in Sandusky, Ohio, Sept. 23, 1892. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). VG. $250

     
CWCDV409.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Major-General John Ellis Wool (1784-1869) was born at Newburg, N. Y., Feb. 20, 1784, son of a soldier of the War for Independence. He was for a time a book-seller at Troy and then a law student, but raised a company of volunteers at the beginning of the war of 1812, and through the influence of De Witt Clinton was made a captain in the 13th infantry in April,1812. He was badly wounded in his first battle, that of Queenstown Heights, received a major’s commission April 13, 1813, took part at Plattsburg and was brevetted lieutenant-colonel. After the reduction of the army to a peace footing he was made colonel and inspector-general (1816). He was brevetted brigadier-general in 1826 and attained the rank by commission in 1841. In 1832 he went to Europe on a tour of inspection and witnessed the siege of Antwerp by the French. In 1836 he had charge of the removal of the Cherokees. In the early days of the war with Mexico he equipped and forwarded from the West 12,000 volunteers. Following them in person, he led 3,000 men from San Antonio to Saltillo and was next in command to Gen. Taylor during the later operations in the interior. At Buena Vista he chose the ground, disposed the forces for action and led them in the beginning of the battle. For his services here he received the brevet of major-general, and at a later date was presented swords by New York and Congress, with the thanks of the latter. He had command in the East, with headquarters at Troy, 1847-54 and 1857-60; was in charge of the Department of the Pacific, 1854-57, taking the field in 1856 against hostile Indians in the northwest. His promptness in reinforcing Fortress Monroe in the spring of 1861 secured that important post to the Union, and in August he was placed there as commander of the Department of Virginia. He occupied Norfolk and Portsmouth May 10, 1862, was commissioned major-general, U. S. A., six days later, and in June was sent to Baltimore to command the Middle Military Department. From Jan. to June, 1863, he had command of the Eastern Department and was stationed at New York, where he called on veterans to volunteer for the suppression of the draft riots. He was retired on Aug. 1, 1863, being long past the age for active service, and died at Troy, N. Y., Nov. 10, 1869. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). VG. $175

   
CWCDV410.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Major-General John Charles Fremont (1813-1890) was born in Savannah, Ga., Jan. 21, 1813 and was educated at Charleston College, from which he was expelled before graduation, although subsequently, in 1836, he was given his degree by the college authorities. He became teacher of mathematics on the sloop-of-war “Natchez” in 1833, on which he took a two-year cruise, and, on returning, passed the necessary examination and was appointed professor of mathematics in the U. S. Navy. He was commissioned 2nd lieutenant in the U. S. topographical engineers in 1838, while engaged in exploring the country between the Missouri and the northern frontier, and in 1842, having suggested a geographical survey of all the territories of the United States, he was sent at the head of a party of 28 men to explore the Rocky Mountain region. In accomplishing this he ascended the highest peak of the Wind River Mountains, which was afterwards known as Fremont’s peak. He next explored the territory between the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific, then a region almost unknown, and early in 1843 started with a party of 39 men, and, after a journey of 1,700 miles, reached Great Salt Lake. It was his report of this region which gave to the Mormons their first idea of settling in Utah. He proceeded thence to the tributaries of the Columbia River and in November started upon the return trip, but, finding himself confronted with imminent danger of death from cold and starvation, turned west, and, after great hardship, succeeded in crossing the Sierra Nevada range and in March reached Sutter’s fort in California. His return journey was conducted safely by the southern route, and he reached Kansas in July 1844. He went on another exploring expedition in 1845, spending the summer along the continental divide and crossing the Sierras again in the winter. Upon refusal of the Mexican authorities to allow him to continue his explorations, he fortified himself with his little force of 64 men on a small mountain some 30 miles from Monterey, but when the Mexicans prepared to besiege the place he retreated to Oregon. He was overtaken near Klamath Lake, May 9, 1846, by a courier with dispatches from Washington, directing him to watch over the interests of the United States in the territory, there being reason to fear interference from both Great Britain and Mexico. He promptly returned to California, where the settlers, learning that Gen. Castro was already marching against the settlements, flocked to his camp, and in less than a month Northern California was freed from Mexican authority. He received a lieutenant-colonel’s commission, May 27, and was elected governor of the territory by the settlers July 4. Learning on July 10 that Com. Sloat, commanding the American squadron on the Pacific coast, had seized Monterey, Fremont joined him and, when Com. Stockton arrived with authority to establish the power of the United States in California, Fremont was appointed by him military commandant and civil governor. Near the end of the year Gen. Kearny arrived with a force of dragoons and said that he had orders also to establish a government. Friction between the two rival officers immediately ensued, and Fremont prepared to obey Stockton and continued as governor in spite of Kearny’s orders. For this he was tried by court-martial in Washington, and, after a trial which lasted more than a year, was convicted, Jan. 31, 1847 of “mutiny,” “disobedience to the lawful command of a superior officer,” and “conduct to the prejudice of good order and military discipline,” and was sentenced to dismissal from the service. President Polk approved of the conviction for disobedience and mutiny, but remitted the penalty and Fremont resigned. In Oct., 1848, Fremont started on an independent exploring expedition with a party of 33 men, and reached Sacramento in the spring of 1849 after more severe sufferings than those experienced on any of his earlier expeditions. He represented California in the United States Senate from Sept., 1850, to March, 1851, and in 1853 made his fifth and last exploring expedition, crossing the Rocky Mountains by the route which he had attempted to follow in 1848. Fremont’s known opposition to slavery won him the presidential nomination of the Republican party in 1856, but in the election he was defeated by Buchanan, who received 174 electoral votes to Fremont’s 114. Soon after the beginning of the Civil War Fremont was appointed major-general in the regular army and assigned to command the newly organized Western Department with headquarters at St. Louis. Soon after the battle of Wilson’s Creek, Aug. 10, 1861 he proclaimed martial law, arrested active secessionists, suspended the publication of papers charged with disloyalty, and issued a proclamation assuming the government of the state and announcing that he would free the slaves of those in arms against the Union. This proclamation he refused to withdraw, and on Sept. 11, the president annulled it as unauthorized and premature. Fremont was relieved of his command, Nov. 2, 1861, many complaints having been made of his administration, but in March, 1862, he was placed in command of the Mountain Department of Virginia, Tennessee and Kentucky. Early in June he pursued the Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson for 8 days, finally engaging him at Cross Keys, June 8, but permitted him to escape with his army. When the Army of Virginia was created June 26, to include Gen. Fremont’s corps, with Pope in command, Fremont declined to serve on the ground that he outranked Pope, and for sufficient personal reasons.  He then went to New York where he remained throughout the war, expecting a command, but none was given him. He was nominated for the presidency, May 31, 1864, by a small faction of the Republican party, but, finding but slender support, he withdrew his name in September. He subsequently became interested in the construction of railroads and in 1873, was prosecuted by the French government for alleged participation in the swindles connected with the proposed transcontinental railway from Norfolk to San Francisco, and was sentenced on default, to fine and imprisonment, no judgment being given on the merits of the case. Gen. Fremont was governor of Arizona in 1878-81, and was appointed major-general on the retired list by act of Congress in 1890. He died in New York City, July 13, 1890. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). VG. $250

     
CWCDV411.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Brigadier-General William Selby Harney (1800-1889) was born near Haysboro, Tenn., Aug. 27, 1800. He was commissioned 2nd lieutenant, 19th U. S. infantry, Feb. 13, 1818, and in the interval between the time of his entering the service and the Civil War he was continuously in the service of the United States, receiving frequent promotions, culminating in promotion to brigadier-general June 14, 1858. He engaged in the Black Hawk War, the Seminole War, the Mexican War, and in numerous engagements against Indians, commanded the Department of the Oregon, 1858-60, until his recall on account of border difficulties with England, and was then assigned to command the Department of the West, with headquarters in St. Louis. In April, 1861, while on his way to Washington, he was arrested by the Virginia troops at Harper’s Ferry, but was soon afterward released, and, on returning to St. Louis, he agreed with Gen. Price in command of the Missouri militia to make no military movement within the borders of the state so long as peace was maintained by the existing state government. He was relieved of his command May 29, 1861, was placed on the retired list Aug. 1, 1863, and on March 13, 1865, was brevetted major-general U. S A. for long and faithful services. Gen. Harney died in Orlando, Fla., May 9, 1889. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). VG. $175

     
CWCDV412.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Capt. Henry Cotton Shumway (1807-1884), 8th Co., 7th Regiment, NYSM (Steuben Guard). 53 year-old Artist when he enlisted on 4/17/1861 at New York City as a Captain. On 4/26/1861 he was commissioned into “H” Co. NY 7th Infantry. He was MO on 6/3/1861 at New York. On 5/25/1862 he was commissioned into “H” Co. NY 7th Infantry. He was MO on 9/5/1862 at New York. On 7/20/1863 he was commissioned into “H” Co. NY 7th Infantry. He was MO on 7/20/1863 at New York. Shumway was born 7/4/1807 in Middletown, CT; died 5/6/1884 in New York City. He was a portrait painter. He attended the public schools; served as a clerk in his father’s office until his twenty-first birthday, and at an early age produced pencil sketches, mostly portraits, of considerable promise. He attended the antique and life classes of the National Academy of Design in New York City, 1828-29; and established himself as a painter of miniature portraits on ivory in New York City in 1830, making transient visits to Washington, Hartford, and other cities. About 1860 he engaged as a photographer in New York City, in addition to his miniature painting, in which he had gained a reputation that gave him the sum of $300 for a portrait upon five-inch ivory. He was a member of the New York State Militia for thirty-five years: and aided in organizing the 7th New York regiment in which he was captain twenty-eight years. He became an associate of the National Academy of Design in 1831, and an Academician in 1832, and received a gold palette for the best miniature portrait in the art exhibition of the New York State fair in 1844. The subjects of his many portraits include: Henry Clay, Judge Storrs, Colonel Wadsworth, Daniel Webster, members of the Trumbull family, and a large head of Napoleon III., from life (1838). (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $250


CWCDV414.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Lt. Col. C.G. Colgate, 15th NY Engineers. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $275


CWCDV416.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. This is Colonel Walter M. McChesney who served with the 10th NY Inf from 2 May 1861 to 1 Sept 1861. Trimmed at bottom. G. $150


CWCDV417.
J. Gurney & Son, NY. Com. Chauncy. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $125


CWCDV420.
E&HT Anthony, NY. Major-General Henry Wager Halleck (1815-1872) was born at Westernville, Oneida, county, N. Y., Jan. 16, 1815. After a common-school education, received at Hudson Academy, and a partial course at Union College, he entered the United States Military Academy July 1, 1835, graduating four years later third in a class of thirty-one. On July 1, 1839, he was appointed second lieutenant in the engineer corps of the army, and from his marked ability and skill as an instructor, while still a cadet, was retained as assistant professor of engineering at the academy until June 28, 1840. During the next year he acted as assistant to the board of engineers at Washington, D. C., and was thence transferred to assist in the construction of the fortifications in New York harbor. Here he remained several years, with the exception of time spent in 1845 on a tour of inspection of public works in Europe,  receiving while absent a promotion to first lieutenant. At the outbreak of the war with Mexico, he was sent to California as engineer of military operations for the Pacific coast, and after a seven-month voyage in the transport Lexington, reached Monterey, Cal., which he partially fortified as a port of refuge for the Pacific fleet, and a base for incursions into California by land. In his military capacity he accompanied several expeditions; in that of Col. Burton into Lower California, he acted as chief of staff to that officer, and took part in the skirmishes of Palos Prietos and Urias, Nov. 19-20, 1847; with a few volunteers made a forced march to San Antonio, March 16, 1848, surprising a large Mexican garrison and nearly capturing the governor, and was engaged at Todos Santos on March 30. He was also aid-de-camp to Com. Shubrick in naval operations on the coast, among which was the capture of Mazatlan (of which for a time he was lieutenant-governor), and for “gallant and meritorious services,” received the commission of captain by brevet, to date from May 1, 1847. As secretary under the military governments of Gens. Mason and Riley, he displayed “great energy, high administrative qualities, excellent judgment and admirable adaptability to his varied and onerous duties,” and as a member of the convention, called to meet at Monterey, Sept. 1, 1849, to frame a constitution for the state of California, he was substantially the author of that instrument. On Dec. 21, 1852, he was appointed inspector and engineer of lighthouses; from April 11, 1853, was a member of the board of engineers for fortifications of the Pacific coast, receiving the promotion of captain of engineers on July 1 and retained all these positions until Aug. 1, 1854, when he resigned from the army to become the head of the most prominent law firm in San Francisco, with large interests and much valuable property in the state, with whose development and prosperity his name was identified. In 1860-61 he was major-general of the militia of
California, and at the outbreak of the Civil war tendered his services to the government, and was appointed major-general on recommendation of Gen. Scott, his commission dating Aug. 19, 1861. On Nov. 18 he took command of the Department of Missouri, with headquarters at St. Louis, where his vigorous rule soon established order. After the victory at Shiloh Halleck took the field, having, March 11, 1862, succeeded to the command of the Department of the
Mississippi, and the siege of Corinth took place under his personal direction. After the evacuation by the enemy, and in the midst of the fortification of Corinth against his return from the south, Halleck was visited by two assistant secretaries of war and one U. S. senator, to urge his acceptance of the office of general-in-chief, which had been tendered him, but which he declined until events in the Peninsular campaign forced his acceptance of the honor. From Washington, on Oct. 28, he wrote the letter which constitutes “the only official explanation of the final removal of McClellan from command, Nov. 7.” After Gen. Grant became lieutenant-general of the army, Halleck remained at Washington as chief of staff March 12, 1864, to April 19, 1865 and from April 22 to July 1 of the latter year was in command of the military division of the James with headquarters at Richmond. On Aug. 30 he took command of the division of the Pacific, from which he was relieved by Gen. George H. Thomas, and on March 16, 1869, was transferred to that of the South, with headquarters at Louisville, Ky. Gen. Halleck died at Louisville, Jan. 9, 1872. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). Buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Brooklyn, NY. Trimmed at bottom. G. $100


CWCDV421.
No backmark. Major-General Henry Wager Halleck (1815-1872). Buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Brooklyn, NY. VG. $65


CWCDV422.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. Major-General William Farrar “Baldy” Smith (1824-1903) was born in the state of Vermont, and was a cadet at the U. S. military academy from July 1, 1841 to July 1, 1845, when he was graduated and promoted in the army to brevet second lieutenant of topographical engineers. He served as assistant topographical engineer on the survey of the Northern lakes, 1845-46; at the military academy as assistant professor of mathematics, Nov. 6, 1846, to Aug. 21, 1848; as assistant topographical engineer on explorations in the Department of Texas, 1848-50, being commissioned second lieutenant of topographical engineers on July 14, 1849. He was on the survey of the boundary between the United States and Mexico 1850-52, on the survey of the canal route across Florida in 1853, and was commissioned first lieutenant of topographical engineers on March 3, 1853. He was on explorations in Texas, 1853-55; at the military academy as principal assistant professor of mathematics, Sept. 4, 1855, to Sept. 8, 1856; as engineer of the 11th light-house district, Dec. 11, 1856, to Nov. 3, 1859, and he was commissioned captain of topographical engineers on July 1, 1859, for fourteen years, continuous service. He then served as engineer secretary of the light-house board from Nov. 3, 1859, to April 15, 1861. He served during the Civil War, first on mustering duty at New York City, April 15 to May 31, 1861, on the staff of Maj.-Gen. Butler at Fort Monroe, Va., June 1 to July 20, and was commissioned colonel of the 3d Vt. infantry on July 16, 1861. He was on the staff of Brig-Gen. McDowell, July 20 to Aug. 13; served in the Manassas campaign and was engaged in the battle of Bull Run, in the defenses of Washington, D. C., July 27, 1861 to March 10, 1862, and he was commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers on Aug. 13, 1861. He served in the Virginia Peninsular campaign, in command of a division of the Army of the Potomac, being engaged in the siege of Yorktown including the skirmish of Lee’s mill, the battles of Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, White Oak swamp, Savage Station, Glendale and Malvern hill. On June 28, 1862, he was brevetted lieutenant-colonel, U. S. A., for gallant and
meritorious services in the battle of White Oak swamp, and in the Maryland campaign he was in command of a division of the Army of the Potomac, being engaged in the battles of South mountain and Antietam, and on the march to Falmouth. On Sept. 17, 1862, he was brevetted colonel, U. S. A., for gallant and  meritorious services in the battle of Antietam; participated in the Rappahannock campaign, in command of the 6th corps Nov. 14, 1861 to Feb. 4, 1863, and of the 9th corps from Feb. 4 to March 17, being engaged in the battle of Fredericksburg. He was commissioned major of the corps of engineers on March 3, 1863, and was in command of a division in the Department of the Susquehanna, being engaged in the pursuit of the Confederate army retreating from Gettysburg, and was then in the Department of West Virginia from Aug. 3 to Sept. 5. He served as chief engineer of the Department of the Cumberland, Oct. 10 to November, and of the Military Division of the Mississippi from Nov., 1863 to March 31, 1864, in operations about Chattanooga, being engaged in surprising a passage and throwing a pontoon bridge across the Tennessee river at Brown’s ferry, and he was also engaged in the battle of Missionary Ridge. On March 9, 1864, he was commissioned major-general of volunteers, and was in command of the 18th corps of the Army of the Potomac from May 2 to July 19, being engaged in the operations before Richmond and in the battle of Cold Harbor and siege of Petersburg. He was on special duty, under the orders of the secretary of war, from Nov. 22, 1864 to Dec. 15, 1865, and was then on leave of absence until March 7, 1867, when he resigned from the regular army, having resigned his volunteer commission on Nov. 4, 1865. He was brevetted brigadier-general, U. S. A., on March 13, 1865, for gallant and meritorious services in the battle of Chattanooga, and on the same date was given the brevet title of major-general U. S. A., for gallant and meritorious services in the field during the Rebellion. He served as president of the International Telegraph company, 1864-73, and became Commissioner of Police of New York City on May 1, 1875, and then served as president of the Board of Police Commissioners from Dec. 31, 1875, to March 11, 1881. After this date he followed civil engineering in the service of the United States. He was reappointed as major, U. S. A., on March 1, 1889, and placed upon the retired list. Gen. Smith died on Feb. 28, 1903. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $200


CWCDV423.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Brigadier-General Louis (Ludwig) Blenker (1812-1863) was born in Worms Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, July 31, 1812. While in the service of the Bavarian legion, which accompanied King Otto to Greece,
he attained the rank of lieutenant, in 1837. He was a leading member of the revolutionary government at Worms, in 1849, and upon the overthrow of the revolutionist cause, was forced to retire to Switzerland. Being ordered to leave that country also, he emigrated in Sept., 1849, to the United States, where he at first undertook to cultivate a farm in Rockland county, N. Y., and later engaged in business in New York City. Being commissioned on May 31, 1861, colonel of the 8th N. Y. Volunteers, which he had organized, he first distinguished himself at the battle of Bull Run, where his regiment, which acted as a reserve, covered the retreat with great steadiness and recovered two Union colors which the retreating soldiers had left on the field. For gallantry at this time he was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers, and, in the early part of the Peninsular campaign, was ordered to West Virginia, where he took an active part in the battle of Cross Keys, June 8, 1862, until, on the arrival of Gen. Fremont, he was superseded by Gen. Sigel. He was then ordered to Washington, mustered out of the service in March, 1863, and on Oct. 31, died on his farm in Rockland county, N. Y., as the result of internal injuries, received from a fall of his horse during the Virginia campaign. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $200


CWCDV424.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General Hugh Judson Kilpatrick (1836-1881). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $250


CWCDV425.
J. Gurney & Son, NY. General Ambrose Everett Burnside (1824-1881). VG. $125


CWCDV426.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General Horatio Gouverneur Wright (1820-1899). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $75


CWCDV428.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General John Adams Dix (1798-1879). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $150


CWCDV431.
J. Gurney & Son, NY. Commander David Glasgow Farragut (1801-1870). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $175


CWCDV433.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. Charles Tillinghast James (1805-1862). Major-general RI Militia; US Senator 1851-’57; mortally wounded Sag Harbor, Oct. ’62, during shell demonstration. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $150


CWCDV436.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. Confederate General Gustavus Woodson Smith (1821-1896), more commonly known as G.W. Smith, was a career US Army officer who fought in the Mexican-American War, a civil engineer, and a major general in the Confederacy. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $300


CWCDV438.
J. Gurney & Son, NY. Lieut. Russell. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $175


CWCDV441.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General George C. Thomas (Oct. 9, 1812-Dec. 2, 1882). This image is misidentified in Warner’s Generals in Blue as Henry Goddard Thomas. George entered the Military Academy at West Point in 1832, graduating four years later. His first service was as Second Lieutenant in the Fourth Artillery in the operations in the Creek Nation in 1836. He served in the Florida war against the Seminole Indians in 1836 to 1837, taking part in the defense of Fort Mellon in February of the latter year. During the following year he was engaged in the removal of the Cherokees to the West, in garrison at Fort Columbus, New York and again in the Florida war. In August 1838 he was promoted to be First Lieutenant. During the next two years he served on the northern frontier during the Canadian border disturbances, on the expedition to collect the Pottawatomie Indians for emigration at various posts in Michigan and at Fort Niagara, New York.

He resigned from the Army January 31, 1842 and until 1858 he was an attorney and claim agent in Washington. He was then appointed to a clerkship in the United States Quartermaster’s Department, which he held two years, when he was transferred to the Engineer Department. When the late war broke out he offered his services to President Lincoln by whom he was appointed Major General of the Militia of the District of Columbia. General Thomas continued in command of this Militia until the close of the rebellion, when he became a clerk in the Quartermaster General’s office in Washington. (from NY Times obituary Dec. 5, 1882).  Trimmed at bottom. VG. $200


CWCDV442.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. Col. Daniel Fletcher Webster (1818-1862). Commander 12th Mass (“The Webster Regiment”); son of Daniel Webster; killed at 2nd Manassas; memorial at Gettysburg. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $400


CWCDV444.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Capt. Thaddeus P. Mott, 3rd NY Artillery. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $250


CWCDV445.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General William Woods Averell (1832-1900). Severely wounded during the Indian Wars. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $250


CWCDV448. 
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. John Henry Martindale (1815-1881). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $200


CWCDV450.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Commander Montgomery. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $150


CWCDV451. 
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. General Egbert Ludovicus Viele (1825-1902). Served at chief engineer of Prospect Park in Bklyn and as NYC Parks Commissioner. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $250


CWCDV452.
E. Anthony, NY. Col. Edward D. Baker (1811-1861) of the 1st California Regiment was a confidante of Lincoln’s, introduced him at his first inaugural; served as a Senator from Oregon; and was killed in action at Ball’s Bluff. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $350


CWCDV453.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Rear Admiral Samuel Francis Dupont (1803-1865). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $200


CWCDV456.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General David Bell Birney (1825-1864). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $325


CWCDV459.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General Quincy Adams Gillmore (1825-1888). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $200


CWCDV461.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General George Archibald McCall (1802-1868). Taken prisoner at Glendale. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $225


CWCDV462.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General John Gray Foster (1823-1874). Severely WIA Molino del Rey, Mexican War; chief engineer Charleston Harbor. Trimmed at bottom. G. $225


CWCDV463.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General Quincy Adams Gillmore (1825-1888). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $200


CWCDV464.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General Julius Stahel (1825-1912); Hungarian who recruited the 8th NY (1st German Rifles). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $375


CWCDV473.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General McClellan & Lady. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $250


CWCDV474.
J. Gurney & Son, NY. Capt. Hudson. Captain William Levereth Hudson, USN (11 May 1794 – 15 October 1862) was a US Navy officer in the first half of the 19th century. Hudson was born 11 May 1794 in Brooklyn. His first service afloat was in the Mediterranean Squadron under Commodore William Bainbridge in the schooner Alert and sloop-of-war Ontario from 1815 to 1817. Hudson was appointed midshipman 1 January 1816. In 1821 – 1823 he served in Dolphin on the Pacific coast of South America, and in Warren for a Mediterranean cruise 1826 -1829. In 1830 – 1831 Hudson accompanied Lieutenant Ramsey on a tour to Russia, and then assumed duty at the NY Navy Yard. In June 1838 he was ordered to command Peacock, attached to Commander Charles Wilkes’ exploring expedition. After strenuous service in the Antarctic, the South Seas, and along the coast of North America, Peacock was wrecked 18 July 1841 while attempting to cross the bar and enter the Columbia River on Wilkes’ orders. Commander Hudson made every effort to free his ship but was forced to leave her, fortunately saving all his men and the scientific papers. In September 1849, after shore and lighthouse duty, he was ordered to command Vincennes, cruising the Pacific until 1852. In March 1857 Hudson, appointed captain 8 October 1855, assumed command of Niagara. That August, in conjunction with British ships, he made the first attempt at laying a transatlantic cable. This try was unsuccessful, but a second attempt met with success 10 August 1858. After commanding the Boston Navy Yard 1858 – 1862, Captain Hudson was made Inspector of the 3d Light House District. He died 15 October 1862 in Brooklyn, aged 68. Three ships have been named USS Hudson in his honor. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $150


CWCDV475.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. General Daniel Butterfield (1831-1901); WIA Gaines Mills; severely WIA Gettysburg; composer of “Taps.” Trimmed at bottom. VG. $450


CWCDV476.
J. Gurney & Son, NY. Admiral Hiram Paulding (1797-1878). In charge of effort to destroy Norfolk Navy Yard, April ’61. Oct. ’61, commander of NY Navy Yard. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $200


CWCDV478.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Assistant Surgeon John Campbell, holding M1840 Medical Staff sword w/sword knot/portapee. Dress chapeau on chair. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $300


CWCDV479.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General David McMortrie Gregg (1833-1916). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $350


CWCDV481.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Col. James A. Mulligan. Recruited 23 IL Vol. Infantry (“Irish Brigade”); WIA several times, finally at Kernstown, died 2 days later as prisoner. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $475


CWCDV482.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Col. Lyman H. Mix of the 3rd NY Cavalry (“Van Allen Cavalry”). Van Allen resigned April ’62, Mix took over; KIA Petersburgh June ’64. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $400


CWCDV485.
E&HT Anthony, NY. Confederate General Edmund Kirby Smith (1824-1893); WIA First Manassas. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $300


CWCDV487.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General George Henry Thomas (1816-1870), the “Rock of Chickamauga.” Trimmed at bottom. VG. $300


CWCDV488.
J. Gurney & Son, NY. Col. Vosburgh, 71 NYS Militia. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $350


CWCDV489.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. General Joseph King Fenno Mansfield (1803-1863), killed at Sharpsburg. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $400


CWCDV490.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Chaplain S.H. Weston of the 7th NY Militia. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $150


CWCDV498.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Col. Prince Felix Salm Salm, 68th Regiment NYS Volunteer Infantry. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $275


CWCDV499.
E&HT Anthony, NY. Confederate General Simon Bolivar Buckner (1823-1914). He yielded to Grant’s demand for ‘unconditional surrender’ at Fort Donelson in 1862. Governor of Kentucky 1887-’91; unsuccessful candidate for Vice President on the National Democratic Party ticket, 1896. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $275


CWCDV503.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Confederate General Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard (1818-1893). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $75


CWCDV506.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. General Winfield Scott (1786-1866). Classic image of Scott sitting outdoors at West Point. VG. $275


CWCDV508.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General Joseph Gilbert Totten (1788-1864). Totten was the 10th graduate of West Point and served as the Chief Engineer of the Army. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $200


CWCDV509.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. General Carl Shurz (1829-1906). First German-born American elected to US Senate; abolitionist, orator, editor; Secretary of the Interior 1877-’81 under Hayes. VG. $350


CWCDV510.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. General Samuel Peter Heintzelman (1805-1880). WIA Bull Run. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $225


CWCDV514.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. General George Stoneman (1822-1894). California Governor ’83-’87. VG. $300


CWCDV515.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General Daniel Butterfield (1831-1901). WIA Gaines Mill, Gettysburg. Composer of “Taps.” Trimmed at bottom. VG. $400


CWCDV517.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General John Alexander McClernand (1812-1890). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $250


CWCDV519.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. General Frederick West Lander (1821-1862). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $200


CWCDV520.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. General William Starke Rosecrans (1819-1898) was an inventor, coal-oil company executive, diplomat, politician, and US Army officer. He was the victor at prominent battles such as Second Corinth, Stones River, and the Tullahoma Campaign, but his military career was effectively ended following his disastrous defeat at the Battle of Chickamauga in 1863. VG. $150


CWCDV521.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General Robert Huston Milroy (1816-1890). Most noted for his defeat at the Second Battle of Winchester. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $225


CWCDV522.
No backmark. General Franz Sigel (1824-1902). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $125


CWCDV526.
E&HT Anthony, NY. Confederate General Samuel Cooper (1798-1876). Cooper was the highest ranking Confederate General. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $175


CWCDV527.
E. Anthony. NY. General Simmons? I think he’s a confederate SC militia general but not sure. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $100


CWCDV528.
E&HT Anthony, NY. Confederate General Joseph Eggleston Johnston (1807-1891). WIA Seven Pines. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $175


CWCDV530.
E&HT Anthony, NY. General Jesse Lee Reno (1823-1862). KIA South Mountain. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $200


CWCDV531.
E&HT Anthony, NY. General James Birdseye McPherson (1828-1864). KIA Battle of Atlanta. He was the highest ranking Union officer killed during the war. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $175


CWCDV533.
E&HT Anthony, NY. General Lovell Harrison Rousseau (1818-1869). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $100


CWCDV534.
E&HT Anthony, NY. General Isaac Ingalls Stevens (1818-1862). Severely WIA during the Mexican War; KIA Battle of Chantilly. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $150


CWCDV535.
No backmark. General Ambrose Everett Burnside (1824-1881). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $75


CWCDV538.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General Hiram Gregory Berry (1824-1863). KIA Chancellorville. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $250


CWCDV539.
E&HT Anthony, NY. Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston (1803-1862). Secretary of War, Republic of Texas 1838-’40; Utah expedition against the Mormons, 1857; KIA Shiloh. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $200


CWCDV545.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. Rear Admiral Charles Wilkes (1798-1877). He led the important US Exploring Expedition in 1838-1842 and was the central figure in the Trent Affair. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $150


CWCDV549. E&HT Anthony, NY. Confederate General Humphrey Marshall (1812-1872). Served as both a US Congressman and a Confederate Congressman. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $125


CWCDV550.
J. Gurney & Son, NY. Capt., later Rear Admiral John Adolphus Bernard Dahlgren (1809-1870). He headed the Navy Ordnance Department during the Civil War. “The Dahlgren Gun,” etc. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $150


CWCDV551.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Rear Admiral William Bradford Shubrick (1790-1874). Trimmed at bottom. VG. $100


CWCDV553.
J. Gurney & Son, NY. Admiral James Hooker Strong (1814-1882). Commander of the Monongahela in the Battle of Mobile Bay. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $150


CWCDV557.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. Abram Duryée (April 29, 1815 – September 27, 1890), Union Army general, the commander of one of the most famous Zouave regiments, the 5th New York Volunteer Infantry. After the war he was NYC Police Commissioner. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $350


CWCDV559.
Alexander Gardner, Washington, DC. Surgeon William James Sloan, Major. Enlisted 12/20/55 as a Surgeon, commissioned into US Army Medical Staff. Promotions: Lt. Col. 3.13.65 by Brevet; Col. 3.13.65 by Brevet; Brig-Gen. 9/28/66 by Brevet. Born in Pennsylvania, died 3/17/1880. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). 2-cent cancelled tax stamp on verso. Top corners clipped. G. $200


CWCDV560.
Marshall, Boston. Private Charles Duncan Lamb; enlisted 9/15/62; mustered into “Landis'” Co. PA Independent Light Artillery; mustered out 9/26/62; 12/11/63 commissioned into “I” Co. MA 2nd Heavy Artillery; discharged for promotion 7/6/64; 7/2/64 commissioned into “I” Co. MA 56th Infantry; discharged for wounds 12/28/64. WIA 7/30/64, Petersburg, Va.; 8/19/64, Weldon Railroad, Va. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). 3-cent cancelled tax stamp on verso. Lower left corner chipped. G. $200


CWCAB6.
Barnard & Gibson copyright, 1862. Brady’s Album Gallery. No. 488. The Iron-Clad Gunboat Galena, showing the effects of the fire from Fort Darling. USS Galena , a 950-ton ironclad gunboat, was built at Mystic, Connecticut. Commissioned in April 1862 as the second of the U.S. Navy’s first three armored warships, she was immediately sent to Hampton Roads, Virginia, to join the Navy’s pioneer ironclad Monitor in containing CSS Virginia . On 8 May, Galena attacked enemy shore batteries on the James River, part of an intended drive up the river to take Richmond, the Confederate capital city.

After the Virginia was destroyed, Galena and other Union warships steamed up the James on 15 May to bombard Fort Darling, located at Drewry’s Bluff about eight miles below Richmond. In a sharp action, Confederate gunners badly damaged Galena , killing twelve of her crew and demonstrating the inadequacy of her relatively thin iron armor. Despite her injuries, the ship remained in the James River area through the next four months, shelling enemy shore positions on several occasions in support of General McClellan’s army during the flow and ebb of its campaign on the Virginia Peninsula. After Galena left the James in September 1862, she was stationed in Hampton Roads until May 1863, when she went to Philadelphia for repairs and alterations.

Recommissioned in February 1864, Galena had been stripped of her iron plating, given a heavier gun battery and enlarged sail rig. Now a conventional unarmored steam warship, in May she joined the West Gulf Blockading Squadron’s pending assault on Mobile Bay, Alabama. She was one of the ships that ran past the Bay’s defending Fort Morgan on the morning of 5 August 1864. During that action, she assisted USS Oneida to safety after that ship was disabled by Confederate gunfire. Later in the month, Galena took part in the siege that led to Fort Morgan’s surrender.

Galena served in the East Gulf Blockading Squadron in September-November 1864. After four months of shipyard repairs, she served on Virginia’s James and Nansemond Rivers through the end of the Civil War. She decommissioned in June 1865 and was thereafter inactive except for a brief time in the spring of 1869. USS Galena was broken up in 1872 at the Norfolk Navy Yard, where a new and somewhat larger Galena was built under the administrative fiction of repairing the original. G. $295


CWCDV564.
M.B. Brady 1862 copyright line bottom recto. Fort Pulaski with a Gun dismounted. G. $250


CWCDV565.
Brady’s Album Gallery. No. 288. Georgetown Aqueduct. VG. $275


CWCDV566.
Rockwood & Co., NY. Unidentified CDV of soldiers with flag in front of tent. 2-cent cancelled revenue stamp on verso. G. $150


CWCDV567.
M.B. Brady 1862 copyright line bottom recto. Fort Pulaski. G. $125


CWCDV568.
Barnard & Gibson’s 1862 copyright line bottom recto. Brady’s Album Gallery. No. 384. White House, Formerly residence of Mrs. Custis Washington, now the residence of Col. Lee. 17th May, 1862. Written in manuscript “burned down June 1862.” VG. $275


CWCDV570.
Brady’s Album Gallery. No. 407. St. Peter’s Church near White House–Built 1717. Where George Washington was married. G. $250


CWCAB8.
M.B. Brady 1862 copyright line bottom recto. Brady’s Album Gallery. No. 489. Military Bridges Across the Chickahominy, Built by the 15th N.Y.V. Engineers, Col. Murphy. Album Card. VG. $300


CWCAB9.
M.B. Brady 1862 copyright line bottom recto. Brady’s Album Gallery. No. 391. Street in Yorktown, Gateway in Distance. VG. $325


CWCAB10.
Brady’s Incidents of the War. View near the Potomac where one of the greatest Battles has been fought called the Wilderness, in pencil on verso. Album Card. VG. $150


CWCDV572.
Manchester Bros., Providence, R.I. 2nd Lieut. Henry L. Starkweather, RI 4th Infantry. Residence, Glocester, RI; enlisted 9/30/61 as a Private; mustered into “D” Co. RI 4th Infantry on 10/30/61; resigned 8/10/62. Promotions: Sergt. 10/14/61; 2nd Lieut. 11/20/61 (Co. K); Intra Regimental Company Transfer from Company D to Company K 11/20/61. VG. $225


CWCDV573.
Manchester Bros., Providence, R.I. Lieut. Colonel Job Arnold. Residence, Providence, R.I.; enlisted 3/2/63 as a Lieut. Colonel; 3/3/63 commissioned into Field & Staff RI 7th Infantry; discharged 5/28/64. G. $175


CWCDV577.
No ID. Late E. P. Colby, Free Citizen. I have been informed that Colby is wearing a US Navy midshipman’s uniform. He resigned from the Naval Academy on March 23, 1866. This is from the “Army and Navy Journal” of March 31, 1866, page 512 (thank you SH).
VG. $150


CWCDV581.
Barnard & Gibson’s 1862 copyright line bottom recto. Brady’s Album Gallery. No. 353. Group. General Van Vliet and Friends, Camp Winfield Scott, near Yorktown. G. $295


CWCDV586.
M.B. Brady, Washington DC. This image was taken in April 1862 at Beaufort, SC by Timothy O’Sullivan. This image is illustrated pn page 419 of The Image of War: 1861-1865, Volume I: Shadows of the The Storm by The National Historical Society, William C. Davis, editor & Bell I. Wiley, Senior Consulting Editor. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co., Inc., 1981. The caption beneath the image reads: One of the war’s finest young photographers was Timothy O’Sullivan, among the first northern cameramen to return to South Carolina with the invading Federals. At Beaufort, in April 1862, he recorded an outstanding series of images, and this one probably includes himself, seated second from the right, at his “mess.” The officers and men seated around the table are being served by three black men. Corners are clipped. VG. $650


CWCDV589.
John P. Soule, Boston. Battlefield flags of the 19th Massachusetts Volunteers. VG. $750


CWCDV598.
C.D. Fredricks & Co., NY. General William Starke Rosecrans (1819-1898) was an inventor, coal-oil company executive, diplomat, politician, and US Army officer. He was the victor at prominent battles such as Second Corinth, Stones River, and the Tullahoma Campaign, but his military career was effectively ended following his disastrous defeat at the Battle of Chickamauga in 1863. VG. $100


CWCDV602.
No ID. Major-General William Farrar Smith (1824-1903). VG. $75


CWCDV612.
No ID. Col. Joseph Hancock Taylor, 6th U.S. Cavalry. VG. $175


CWCDV622.
No ID. CDV of Union 1st Sergeant Frederick A. Smith, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery full standing pose on the front of a Social Party invitation to him to attend at Ripley’s Hall, North Easton, Thursday, March 23, 1865. Earlier in the war Smith also served in the MA 4th Infantry. G. $150


CWCDV629.
Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony. General Hooker (1814-1879). WIA Antietam. Brady’s 1862 copyright line bottom recto. G. $95


CWCDV632.
R.W. Addis, Photographer, McClees’ Gallery, Washington, DC. Unusual backmark that actually identifies the particular photographer in an owner’s studio. General George Archibald McCall (1802-1868). Taken prisoner at Glendale. Corners trimmed. G. $95


CWCDV634.
No ID. Commodore George Smith Blake (1803-1871), Commandant of the US Naval Academy at Annapolis during the Civil War. VG. $135


CWCDV636.
Brigham, Dover, NH. First Lieut. Thomas Albert Henderson, 7th NH Vols. KIA at Deep Bottom Run, Va. on 8/16/64, suffering a severe wound to his hip. Henderson’s bust image (below) is illustrated in Norwich University, 1819-1911, Her History, Her Graduates, Her Roll of Honor, compiled and edited by William A. Ellis. G. $150


CWCDV637.
A. Sonrel, Boston. Thomas A. Henderson, 7th NH Vols. KIA at Deep Bottom Run, Va. on 8/16/64, suffering a severe wound to his hip. This image has a 3-cent cancelled tax stamp on verso dated Oct. 10, 1864. This is nearly two months following Henderson’s death in action and was likely issued after his death. Support of this comes from the fact that Henderson is pictured in his First Lieut. uniform although he went on to be promoted to Lt. Col. 7/22/63. This was likely the image that was preferred for his post mortem issuance. This image is illustrated in Norwich University, 1819-1911, Her History, Her Graduates, Her Roll of Honor, compiled and edited by William A. Ellis. VG. $150


CWCDV640.
Webster & Bro., Louisville. Col. Franklin F. Flint (1821-1891), 16th US Infantry. Mount has been trimmed, image VG. $125


CWCDV643.
Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E. Anthony, NY. Louis Philippe d’Orleans, comte de Paris, and Robert d’Orleans, duc de Chartres, French nobles serving in the Peninsular Campaign of McClellan as aides-de-camp. G+. $125


CWCDV648.
Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E. Anthony, NY. Major-Gen. Ormsby McKnight Mitchel (1810-1862), born in
Morganfield, Ky., Aug. 28, 1810. He was graduated at the United States military academy in 1829, served as assistant professor of mathematics at West Point for two years, and was then on garrison duty until Sept. 30, 1832, when he resigned. He was in that year admitted to the bar, practiced two years in
Cincinnati, was chief engineer of the Little Miami railroad, 1836-37, and professor of mathematics, astronomy and philosophy at Cincinnati college, 1834-44.  He raised almost all the money for the establishment of an observatory at Cincinnati, which was the first of the larger observatories to be built in the United States and in 1843 the corner-stone of the pier for the great telescope was laid by John Quincy Adams. Prof. Mitchel lectured extensively throughout the United States from 1842 to 1848; was adjutant-general of the state of Ohio, 1841-48; chief engineer of the Ohio & Mississippi railroad, 1848-49, and again
in 1852-53, and was director of the Dudley observatory at Albany, N. Y., in 1859-61. He invented a number of valuable mechanical devices for use in astronomy, and gained great distinction in his profession. He was commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers, Aug. 9, 1861, and at first reported to Gen. McClellan, who assigned him the command of Gen. William B. Franklin’s brigade in the Army of the Potomac; but at the request of the citizens of Cincinnati he was transferred to that city and commanded the Department of the Ohio from Sept. 19 to Nov. 13 1861. He served with the Army of the Ohio during the campaigns of the winter of 1861-62 in Tennessee and northern Alabama, took part in the occupation of Bowling Green, Ky., Nashville, Tenn., the march to Huntsville, Ala., in the action near Bridgeport, Ala., April 30, 1862, and was promoted major-general of volunteers to date from April 11, 1862. He took possession of the railroad from Decatur to Stephenson, by which the control of northern Alabama was secured to the Federal authorities. He was anxious to advance into the heart of the South, but was restrained by his superior officer, Gen. Buell, and in consequence of a dispute with Buell he tendered his resignation to the secretary of war and was transferred to the command of the Department of the South, with headquarters at Hilton Head, S. C., Sept. 17, 1862. He died of yellow fever at Hilton Head, Oct. 30, 1862. (From Historical Data System’s American Civil War Research Database at civilwardata.com). G. $150


CWCDV649. D.P. Parr, Army Photographer, Palace of Art, Vicksburg, Miss. Unidentified soldier. VG. $65


CWCDV653.
Brady’s Album Gallery. No. 496. Gen’l Fitz John Porter and Staff, at Headquarters, Westover, Westover Landing, Va. July 16, 1862. This image measures 2 7/8″ x 4 1/8.” There are 3 black people posed along with the soldiers. VG. $650


CWCAB16.
Brady’s Album Gallery. Album Card measuring 4.5″ x 6.” No. 408. Major Gen’l E.V. Sumner, at his Quarters near Yorktown, May, 1862. VG. $650


CWCAB17.
Brady’s Album Gallery. Album Card measuring 4.5″ x 6.” No. 421. General French, Taken in Camp on the Chickahominy, 29th of May, 1862. VG. $650


CWCDV668.
Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony. Alexander Hamilton Stephens (February 11, 1812 – March 4, 1883) was  from Georgia. He was Vice President of the Confederate States of America during the Civil War. He also served as a US Representative from Georgia (both before the Civil War and after Reconstruction) and as the 50th Governor of Georgia from 1882 until his death in 1883. VG. $125


CWCDV670.
Charles D. Fredricks & Co., New York. John Ericsson (July 31, 1803 – March 8, 1889), a Swedish-American inventor and mechanical engineer. Amongst many other activities he worked on the design of the USS Monitor. VG. $150


CWCDV671.
No ID. Chas. H. Simmons, 11th CT Vols. Info on Simmons: Residence Ashford CT; Enlisted on 10/5/1861 as a Private. On 10/24/1861 he mustered into “B” Co. CT 11th Infantry. He was dismissed on 11/2/1865. Promotions: * Corpl 7/25/1862 (As of Co. B); * Sergt 12/25/1862 (As of Co. D); * 1st Sergt 1/17/1863 (As of Co. H); * 2nd Lieut 8/9/1863 (As of Co. G); * 1st Lieut 4/9/1864 (As of Co. D); * Capt 8/22/1864 (As of Co. F). Intra Regimental Company Transfers: * 12/23/1862 from company B to company D; * 1/17/1863 from company D to company H; * 8/9/1863 from company H to company G; * 4/9/1864 from company G to company D; * 8/22/1864 from company D to company F. This is a trick photograph as Simmons is seated twice at the table. 1-cent cancelled revenue stamp on verso. VG. $250

CWCDV677. D.W. Bowdoin, Salem, Mass. Private Oliver W.H. Upham, 23rd Mass. Residence Salem MA; an 18 year-old Student. Enlisted on 10/21/1861 as a Private. On 12/4/1861 he mustered into “F” Co. MA 23rd Infantry. He was discharged for disability on 11/22/1861 at Annapolis, MD. On 5/26/1862 he mustered into MA Salem Cadets. He was Mustered Out on 10/11/1862 at Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, MA. VG. $125


CWCDV678.
Frederick Clark, Harrisburg, Pa. Capt. Hugh G. Brown, 15th Iowa. Residence Keosauqua IA; 27 years old. Enlisted on 12/1/1861 as a 2nd Lieutenant. On 12/1/1861 he was commissioned into “E” Co. IA 15th Infantry. He was discharged for promotion on 8/28/1863. On 8/28/1863 he was commissioned into US Volunteers Aide-de-Camp. He was Mustered Out on 7/10/1866 (Subsequent service in US Army until 05/16/1899). Promotions:
* 1st Lieut 7/9/1862; * Capt 8/28/1863 (Captain and Aide de Camp to General Ord); * Major 9/29/1864 by Brevet; * Lt Colonel 3/31/1865 by Brevet; * Capt 3/2/1867 by Brevet; * Major 3/2/1867 by Brevet. Other Information: born in Pennsylvania; died 11/30/1901. VG. $125


CWCDV699. J.C. Spooner, Springfield, Mass. “Yours for the War H.O. Wiley.” This is Captain Henry O. Wiley, 123rd NY Vols. 31 years old when he enlisted on 8/22/1862 at Salem, NY as a Captain. On 9/10/1862 he was commissioned into “K” Co. NY 123rd Infantry. He was Killed on 7/20/1864 at Peach Tree Creek, GA. Corners clipped o/w VG. $225


CWCDV700.
Brady’s National Photographic Portrait Galleries, Wash. DC. Capt. Charles W. Gleason, 2nd R.I. Infantry. Enlisted on 6/5/1861 as a Private. On 6/5/1861 he mustered into “A” Co. RI 2nd Infantry. He Re-enlisted on 12/26/1863. He was Killed on 4/6/1865 at Sailor’s Creek, VA. He was listed as:
* Detailed 11/15/1862 Regt Provost Sergeant; * Returned 3/3/1863 (place not stated); * Absent as Vet Vol 2/15/1864 (place not stated); * Commanding 10/15/1864 Company A (Estimated day) * Returned 12/15/1864 (place not stated) * Commanding 1/15/1865 Company B; * Returned 3/15/1865 (place not stated). Promotions: * Corpl 8/27/1861 (As of Co. A); * Sergt 1/17/1862 (As of Co. A); * 1st Sergt 3/15/1863 (As of Co. A. Estimated day); * 2nd Lieut 7/25/1864; * Capt 9/19/1864 by Brevet * 1st Lieut 11/6/1864 (As of Co. A); * Capt 3/17/1865 (As of Co. G). Intra Regimental Company Transfers: * 3/17/1865 from company A to company G. Green, 3-cent tax stamp on verso. VG. $225


CWCDV703. No ID. 1st Sergeant Nathaniel R. Blaney, Co. G. 1st Mass. Heavy Artillery. Residence Marblehead MA; a 26 year-old Cordwainer. Enlisted on 7/5/1861 at Marblehead, MA as a Corporal. On 7/5/1861 he mustered into “G” Co. MA 1st Heavy Artillery. He died of wounds on 7/8/1864 at Washington, DC (Died at Armory Square Hospital). He was listed as: * Wounded 6/16/1864 Petersburg, VA. Promotions: * Sergt; * 1st Sergt; * 2nd Lieut 11/20/1863 (As of Co. F). Intra Regimental Company Transfers: * 11/20/1863 from company G to company F. G. $200


CWCDV708.
J.B. Gardner, NY. Thomas Hooten, 2nd Lieut. Co. D, 7th Conn. Vols. Killed at the Battle of James Island, S.C. June 16th, 1862. Residence Norwalk CT; Enlisted on 8/24/1861 as a 2nd Lieutenant. On 9/5/1861 he was commissioned into “D” Co. CT 7th Infantry.  He also had service in: “E” Co. CT 1st Infantry. G. $225


CWCDV712.
A. Lonrel?, Boston. “Major James Toomey, Co. A, 24th Mass. Vols.,” written on back. I can’t find a record with this data. There is a James Twomey of the 33rd Mass. who died of wounds at Kingston Ga. but no record of a Toomey or Twomey with the 24th Mass. 3-cent tax stamp on verso. Please let me know if you can identify this mystery man. VG. for now, $75


CWCDV714.
John A. Heard, Boston. Samuel M. Bowman, Co. A, MA 51 & 57 Inf. Killed in Action, July 24, 1864, Petersburg. From the database: Residence Clinton MA; a 26 year-old Machinist. Enlisted on 9/16/1862 as a Sergeant. On 9/25/1862 he mustered into “A” Co. MA 51st Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 7/27/1863 at Worcester, MA. On 1/4/1864 he was commissioned into “A” Co. MA 57th Infantry. He was Killed on 7/24/1864 at Petersburg, VA (Mortally wounded in the thigh and leg by a confederate mortar shell) He was listed as: * Absent, sick 5/6/1864 Washington, DC; * Returned 5/28/1864 (place not stated). Promotions: * 1st Lieut 12/26/1863 (As of Co. A 57th MA Inf). Other Information: born in Clinton, MA; Buried: Clinton, MA;
(Buried 08/05/64 in Clinton, MA). VG. $225


CWCDV716.
J. Oldershaw, Hartford, Conn. John Alexander. Residence Enfield CT; Enlisted on 6/21/1861 as a Private. On 7/22/1861 he mustered into “B” Co. CT 5th Infantry. He was transferred out on 1/11/1864. On 1/11/1864 he transferred into “G” Co. CT 20th Infantry. He was transferred out on 3/26/1864. On 3/26/1864 he transferred into “B” Co. CT 5th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 7/22/1864. G. $125


CWCDV717.
C.L. Lochman, Carlisle, Penna. Private Robert M. M’Keehan, Co. D, 187 PA Infantry. Residence was not listed; Enlisted on 1/29/1864 as a Private. On 1/29/1864 he mustered into “D” Co. PA 187th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 8/3/1865 at Harrisburg, PA. (In 1900, lived in Mount Rock, PA.) G-. $125


CWCDV720.
M. Sancier, Mobile, Ala. “Your Truly D.G. Horton.” On back is “Co. E, 15th U.S.I. Fort Morgan, Ala. G. $150


CWCDV722.
Broadbent & Co., Philadelphia. “Affecty Yr. Bro. Wm. McMichael, Maj. AAG.” Residence was not listed; Enlisted on 8/15/1861 as a Captain. On 8/15/1861 he was commissioned into US Volunteers Adjutant Genl Dept. He was Mustered Out on 3/20/1866. Promotions: * Capt 8/15/1861 (Captain & Asst Adjutant General); * Major 8/16/1862 (Major & Asst Adjutant General); * Lt Colonel 3/13/1865 by Brevet; * Colonel 3/13/1865 by Brevet. Other Information: born in Pennsylvania; died 4/20/1893. G. $135


CWCDV724.
R.A. Lewis, NY. Thomas W. Dee. Residence Massachusetts; Enlisted on 10/18/1861 as a Actg 3 Asst Eng. On 10/18/1861 he was commissioned into US Navy. He was discharged on 6/9/1866. He was listed as: * Resigned 1/4/1863 (place not stated); * Reappointed 6/26/1863 (place not stated). Ships served on in Navy: * USS OHIO; * USS DAFFODIL; * USS MASSACHUSETTS; * South Atlantic Squadron. Other Information: born in Maine. On back of carte is written: “Thomas W. Dee grandfather of Lieut. J. F. Gleason USA 1943, W.M. Gearan, Cathleen Dee Gearan.” VG. $135


CWCDV725.
No ID. Capt. Lyman Y. Stuart, US Volunteers Commissary Dept. Residence was not listed; Enlisted on 9/10/1862 as a Captain. On  9/10/1862 he was commissioned into US Volunteers Commissary Dept. He was Mustered Out on 6/16/1865. Promotions: * Capt 9/10/1862 (Captain & Commissary); * Major 6/16/1865 by Brevet. Other Information: born in Connecticut. VG. $125


CWCDV727.
No ID. “Your Cousin Chas. McLean Knox.” Residence was not listed; Enlisted on 11/4/1861 at Albany, NY as a Major. On 11/4/1861 he was commissioned into Field & Staff NY 9th Cavalry. He was discharged on 10/8/1863. VG. $150


CWCDV728.
No ID. Charles McLean Knox. Residence was not listed; Enlisted on 11/4/1861 at Albany, NY as a Major. On 11/4/1861 he was commissioned into Field & Staff NY 9th Cavalry. He was discharged on 10/8/1863. Outdoor image measuring 3 1/4″ x 2 3/8.” VG. $150


CWCDV730.
Bryant, Charlestown. “John Collins, 3rd Regt. Oct. 1861.” Private John K. Collins. While his signed name gives no initial, later writing at the bottom of the card indicates his middle initial is “K.” There is a John K. Collins in the HDS database and here is his information: Residence Deer Isle ME; a 22 year-old Seaman. Enlisted on 11/1/1861 as a Private. On 11/1/1861 he mustered into “Read’s” Co. MA 3rd Cavalry. He was discharged for wounds on 3/28/1864 at New Orleans, LA. He was listed as: * Wounded (date and place not stated). Other Information: born in Deer Isle, Maine. Member of GAR Post # 179 (Samuel F. Woods) in Barre, MA; died 6/25/1926. There is also a John S. Collins from the same regiment with similar information in the database. And there is one additional John Collins, no initial who served in the MA 3rd Heavy Artillery. I have just been contacted by an astute observer who believes this is John Allen of the 3rd MA Militia. Looking at the name again, I think this may be the case. VG. $135


CWCDV731.
No ID. Col. John Slocum, 2nd Rhode Island. Residence Providence RI; 36 years old. Enlisted on 4/17/1861 as a Major. On 5/2/1861 he was commissioned into Field & Staff RI 1st Infantry. He was discharged for promotion on 6/4/1861. On 6/5/1861 he was commissioned into Field & Staff RI 2nd Infantry. He was Killed on 7/21/1861 at Bull Run, VA. Promotions: * Colonel 6/5/1861 (As of 2nd RI Inf). Other Information: born 11/1/1824 in Richmond, RI; Buried: Swan Point Cemetery, Providence, RI; (Served in Mexican War.  Married Abby J. James in 1858). VG. $300


CWCDV734.
Bogardus, NY. “Yours Truly William Welch,” Co. D, 68th NY Infantry. Residence was not listed; 22 years old. Enlisted on 5/27/1861 at New York City, NY as a Private. On 5/27/1861 he mustered into “A” Co. NY 83rd Infantry. He was discharged for promotion on 1/14/1863. On 1/14/1863 he was commissioned into NY 68th Infantry (date and method of discharge not given). Promotions: * Corpl 10/15/1862; * 2nd Lieut 1/14/1863. G. $150


CWCDV735.
Jas. M. Dow, Photographist, Ogdensburgh. “To Jane from Loren.” Loren Wellington Fuller, 60 NY Vols. Residence was not listed; 21 years old. Enlisted on 9/12/1861 at Ogdensburgh, NY as a Sergeant. On 10/30/1861 he mustered into “D” Co. NY 60th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 7/17/1865 at Alexandria, VA. Promotions: * 1st Sergt 2/16/1863; * 2nd Lieut 3/15/1863 (Not Mustered); * 1st Lieut 9/20/1863; * Adjutant 2/1/1864; * Capt 1/20/1865 (As of Co. C). Intra Regimental Company Transfers: * 3/27/1865 from company D to company C. VG. $150


CWCDV738.
Claflin’s Photographic Gallery, Worcester, Mass. “Willard Corney, 117th V.R.C., Portsmouth Grove, R.I.” Residence Woonsocket RI;  Enlisted on 8/1/1862 as a Private. On 8/1/1862 he mustered into “H” Co. RI 1st Cavalry. He was transferred out on 3/12/1864. On 3/12/1864 he transferred into “117th” Co. Veteran Reserve Corps 2nd Battn. He was Mustered Out on 8/15/1865. He was listed as: * POW 6/18/1863 Middleburg, VA (Paroled);
* POW 10/12/1863 Sulphur Springs, VA (Paroled); * Absent sick 12/15/1863 U.S. General Hospital (Estimated day, until transfer to RC). VG. $175


CWCDV739.
J. Jones, Rendezvous of Distribution, Va. “W. R. McClellan, Shurley Village, Mass.” William R. McClellan. Residence was not listed; a 21 year-old Operative. Enlisted on 8/17/1864 as a Private. On 8/17/1864 he mustered into “I” Co. MA 4th Heavy Artillery. He was Mustered Out on 6/17/1865 at Washington, DC. 3-cent tax stamp on verso. Unusual “Rendezvous of Distribution” location backmark. VG. $165


CWCDV740.
Haines & Wickes, Albany, NY. “Yours Truly James Brennan US Vols.” Residence was not listed; an 18 year-old Clerk. Enlisted on 1/4/1864 at Troy, NY as a Private. On 1/14/1864 he mustered into “K” Co. NY 7th Heavy Artillery. He was transferred out on 4/17/1865. On 4/17/1865 he transferred into “138th” Co. Veteran Reserve Corps 2nd Battn. He was Mustered Out on 8/9/1865 at Albany, NY. (Subsequent service in US Army until his death). He was listed as: * Wounded 6/3/1864 Cold Harbor, VA (Wounded in left hand and forehead). Other Information: born in England; died 7/15/1888. VG. $165


CWCDV741.
Brady’s National Photographic Portrait Galleries, Wash DC. Frank McDonald Lt. Co. B, 24 NY Cavalry. Residence was not listed; 22 years old. Enlisted on 12/24/1863 at Auburn, NY as a Sergeant. On 1/7/1864 he mustered into “B” Co. NY 24th Cavalry. He was transferred out on 6/17/1865. On 6/17/1865 he transferred into “B” Co. NY 1st Prov’l Cavalry. He was Mustered Out on 7/19/1865 at Cloud’s Mills, VA. Promotions: * Qtr Master Serg 7/1/1864 (Estimated date); * 1st Sergt 11/26/1864; * 2nd Lieut 5/11/1865; * 1st Lieut 6/17/1865 (Not Mustered). Intra Regimental Company Transfers:
* from company B to company C (As of 24th NY Cav. May have been transferred). G. $150


CWCDV742.
S. Moses & Son, New Orleans. “To my….Thomas H. Nolan, Co. D, 5th U.S.V. Port Hudson, La. March 4th, 1864.” Residence New Bedford MA; a 19 year-old Clerk. Enlisted on 8/21/1862 at New Bedford, MA as a Private. On 8/31/1862 he mustered into “A” Co. MA 3rd Cavalry.
He was discharged for promotion on 7/21/1863. On 7/21/1863 he was commissioned into US CT 82nd Infantry. He Resigned on 6/15/1865. Promotions: * Corpl; * 1st Lieut 7/21/1863 (As of 82nd UC Inf). Other Information: born in Fairhaven, MA; Member of GAR Post # 1 (William Logan Rodman) in New Bedford, MA; died 4/20/1922. After the War he lived in New Bedford, MA. VG. $175


CWCDV743.
W. Hunt, New Haven, Conn. 1st Lieut Robert Bradley, Co. H, 15th Conn. Vols. Regimental History has him in Co. D as 2nd Lieut. promoted to Capt. of Co. H 10-25-63. He is in the Soldiers and Sailors system, not in HDS. VG. $175


CWCDV744.
Pine & Bell, Troy, NY. “Sergt. Finney.” I believe this is John Finney, Co. H, NY 4oth Infantry. Residence was not listed; Enlisted on 7/27/1864 as a Corporal. On 7/27/1864 he transferred into “H” Co. NY 40th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 6/27/1865 at Washington, DC. Promotions:
* Private (Reduced to ranks); * Corpl 8/20/1864; * Sergt 10/11/1864. He also had service in: NY 74th Infantry. G. $125


CWCDV747.
No ID. “Truly Yours, James. A. Riley.” On back is written “James A. Riley, 3rd R.I. Cavalry.” Since there are other James A. Rileys in the HDS database, and without knowing where the attribution comes from, I can’t be sure that this is a RI soldier. 3-cent tax stamp on verso. VG. $125


CWCDV748.
A.R. Butts, Benton Barracks, St. Louis, Mo. “Captain John Mitchell.” There is a slip of paper with this CDV with “Jno K. (I think) Mitchell Comdg 2 Rt. Sqdn.” (I think) on it. There is a story here but I haven’t been able to pin it down as of yet. G. $150


CWCDV749.
R.S. De Lamater, Hartford, Ct. “Ira Graham” written on verso. 3-cent tax stamp on verso. VG. $125


CWCDV750.
Knowlton’s Photograph Gallery, Woburn. “Charles Hastings, 12th Mass.,” written on verso. Also “From collection of Cyrus Dollin 1862-1942.”  Residence Weymouth MA; a 30 year-old Shoe Stitcher. Enlisted on 6/26/1861 as a 1st Lieutenant. On 6/26/1861 he was commissioned into “H” Co. MA 12th Infantry. He was discharged on 3/12/1865 (Discharged per SO # 121). He was listed as: * POW 5/24/1864 North Anna River, VA (Confined at Macon, GA & Columbia, SC); * Released 3/1/1865 Wilmington, NC. Promotions: * Capt 8/10/1862. Other Information: born 1/19/1831; Member of GAR Post # 58 (Reynolds) in Weymouth, MA. Held GAR Offices: * Post Commander # 58; died 3/26/1941. After the War he lived in South Weymouth, MA. VG. $225


CWCDV752.
McGregor’s Photograph Gallery, NY. “John Longhran,” on front; “83rd N.Y. Vol.,” on back. Residence was not listed; 18 years old. Enlisted on 3/20/1862 at New York City, NY as a Private. On 3/20/1862 he mustered into “I” Co. NY 83rd Infantry. He was discharged for disability on 2/6/1863 at Convalescent Camp, VA. Note 3-7-12: It has been pointed out to me by an advanced collector that “his sack coat is unlike any of the 83rd NY uniform cdvs in my collection of that regiment and appears to be of late war style…Longran was discharged in early 63. Could his signature actually be Loughran?” Looking at it, it certainly could be Loughran. There are 6 Loughrans in the database but only 4 that would likely match this soldier. (Thanks JM). VG. $150


CWCDV753.
Churchill & Denison, Albany, NY. “Mr. John McMaster 1864,” and “9th N.Y. H.A.,” written on back. Residence was not listed; 29 years old.
Enlisted on 8/2/1862 at Ira, NY as a 1st Sergeant. On 8/23/1862 he mustered into “K” Co. NY 9th Heavy Artillery. He was discharged for disability on 3/25/1865. Promotions: * 1st Lieut 3/19/1864 (As of Co. B). Intra Regimental Company Transfers: * 3/19/1864 from company K to company B. VG. $165


CWCDV755.
Whitehurst Gallery, Wasington, DC. “Harmon McCormick,” written on front. This is Harmon McCormack in HDS, 16th IN Light Artillery. Residence was not listed; Enlisted on 11/4/1863 as a Private. On 11/4/1863 he mustered into IN 16th Light Artillery. He was Mustered Out on 7/5/1865 at Indianapolis, IN. VG. $175


CWCDV758.
New Orleans Photographic Co., A.A. Turner, Photo. “F.N. Finney, Captain, 7th Vt. Vetra? Vols,” on back. Frank N. Finney. Residence Brandon VT; Enlisted on 11/16/1861 as a Sergeant. On 2/12/1862 he mustered into “B” Co. VT 7th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 4/2/1866. Promotions: * 2nd Lieut 9/24/1862 (As of Co. G); * 1st Lieut 3/1/1863 (As of Co. D); * Capt 2/28/1865 (As of Co. H). Intra Regimental Company Transfers: * 10/24/1862 from company B to company G; * 3/26/1863 from company G to company D; * 4/5/1865 from company G to company H. 2-cent tax stamp on verso. VG. $250


CWCDV759.
Rehn & Sons, Philadelphia. “James Kilkelly, Co. A, 2nd D.C. Vols.,” written on back. Residence was not listed; Enlisted as a Private (date unknown). VG. $150


CWCDV761.
O.B. Buel, Photographic Artist, Gt. Barrington, Mass. “John Alexander from Enfield. 5th Conn. Vol.” Residence Enfield CT; Enlisted on 6/21/1861 as a Private. On 7/22/1861 he mustered into “B” Co. CT 5th Infantry. He was transferred out on 1/11/1864. On 1/11/1864 he transferred into “G” Co. CT 20th Infantry. He was transferred out on 3/26/1864. On 3/26/1864 he transferred into “B” Co. CT 5th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 7/22/1864. VG. $175


CWCDV762.
Moulthrop & Williams, New Haven, Ct. Dr. S.C. McCormick. Residence was not listed; Enlisted on 6/11/1863 as a Asst Surgeon. On 6/11/1863 he mustered into Field & Staff PA 37th Infantry (8th PA Reserves). He was Mustered Out on 5/24/1864 at Pittsburgh, PA. VG. $200


CWCDV763.
No ID. On back is written “George Keating, 174th NY, ID Roger Hunt, Henry Deeks.” George W. Keating. Residence was not listed; Enlisted as a Major (date unknown). On 2/17/1864 he was commissioned into Field & Staff NY 162nd Infantry. He was discharged for disability on 6/9/1864. He also had service in: Field & Staff NY 174th Infantry. G. $175


CWCDV764.
No ID. “Yours Respectfully S.P. Dempsey,” written on front. There are 4 ‘S. Dempseys’ without middle initial and none with a ‘P’ middle initial in HDS, so no way to tell which is our man. G. $125


CWCDV765.
Rockwood, NY. “Capt. E.C. Boynton, …? July 24th-For Dr. Webster,” written on back. Edward Carlisle Boynton, US Army 11th Infantry.  Residence was not listed; Enlisted on 9/23/1861 as a Captain. On 9/23/1861 he was commissioned into US Army 11th Infantry (date and method of discharge not given). (Prior service in US Army 1846-1856 and subsequent to 12/1/1872). Promotions: * Major 3/13/1865 by Brevet. Other Information:
born in Vermont; died 3/13/1893. (Graduate USMA 07/1/1846). G. $200


CWCDV766.
J.H. Abbott, Albany, NY. “Lt. Thomas Dempsey, 44th NY Inf.,” written on back. Residence was not listed; 41 years old. Enlisted on 8/30/1862 at North Greenbush, NY as a Sergeant. On 9/25/1862 he mustered into “E” Co. NY 44th Infantry. He was discharged on 6/29/1864. He was listed as: * Accidentally Wounded 8/19/1863 (place not stated). Promotions: * 2nd Lieut 6/23/1863 (Not Mustered); * Sergt 10/28/1863; * 1st Lieut 12/26/1863 (As of Co. I). Intra Regimental Company Transfers: * 12/26/1863 from company I to company E. 2-cent tax stamp on verso. VG. $175


CWCDV767.
No ID. “A. Lyon, Hospital Steward, on back. Abram Lyon. Residence was not listed; Enlisted as a Hospl Steward (date unknown). He also had service in: Field & Staff US CT 81st Infantry. G. $125


CWCDV768.
C.L. Lochman, Carlisle, Pa. “Lt. McDonald, 1st Cav.,” written on back. John McDonald. Residence was not listed; Enlisted on 8/18/1857 as a Private. On 8/18/1857 he mustered into “K” Co. US Army 1st Cavalry. He was Retired on 7/1/1868. Promotions: * Corpl; * Sergt; * 1st Sergt; * 2nd Lieut 7/17/1862; * 1st Lieut 12/29/1863; * Capt 7/1/1868. Other Information: born in Ireland. VG. $200


CWCDV769.
No ID. “Affectionately Yours, Capt. John Harty,” written on front. John D. Harty. Residence Oakland MI; 27 years old. Enlisted on 6/19/1861 at Detroit, MI as a Captain. On 8/22/1861 he mustered into “F” Co. MI 7th Infantry. He Resigned on 5/5/1862. G. $200


CWCDV770.
R.H. Dewey, Photographic Artist, Pittsfield, Mass. “Charles T. Plunkett, Maj. 49th Mass.,” written on back. Residence Pittsfield MA; a 22 year-old Manufacturer. Enlisted on 9/8/1862 as a Captain. On 9/19/1862 he was commissioned into “C” Co. MA 49th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 9/1/1863 at Pittsfield, MA. Promotions: * Major 11/10/1862. Intra Regimental Company Transfers: * 11/10/1862 from company C to Field & Staff. VG. $225


CWCDV774.
No ID. Major O.D. Barrett, 11th NY Cavalry, according to legend at bottom of card. I can’t find anything on a soldier with this name. Fair. $50


CWCDV775.
Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony. Major-Gen. Ormsby McKnight Mitchel (1810-1862), born in
Morganfield, Ky., Aug. 28, 1810. He was graduated at the United States military academy in 1829, served as assistant professor of mathematics at West Point for two years, and was then on garrison duty until Sept. 30, 1832, when he resigned. He was in that year admitted to the bar, practiced two years in
Cincinnati, was chief engineer of the Little Miami railroad, 1836-37, and professor of mathematics, astronomy and philosophy at Cincinnati college, 1834-44.  He raised almost all the money for the establishment of an observatory at Cincinnati, which was the first of the larger observatories to be built in the United States and in 1843 the corner-stone of the pier for the great telescope was laid by John Quincy Adams. Prof. Mitchel lectured extensively throughout the United States from 1842 to 1848; was adjutant-general of the state of Ohio, 1841-48; chief engineer of the Ohio & Mississippi railroad, 1848-49, and again
in 1852-53, and was director of the Dudley observatory at Albany, N. Y., in 1859-61. He invented a number of valuable mechanical devices for use in astronomy, and gained great distinction in his profession. He was commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers, Aug. 9, 1861, and at first reported to Gen. McClellan, who assigned him the command of Gen. William B. Franklin’s brigade in the Army of the Potomac; but at the request of the citizens of Cincinnati he was transferred to that city and commanded the Department of the Ohio from Sept. 19 to Nov. 13 1861. He served with the Army of the Ohio during the campaigns of the winter of 1861-62 in Tennessee and northern Alabama, took part in the occupation of Bowling Green, Ky., Nashville, Tenn., the march to Huntsville, Ala., in the action near Bridgeport, Ala., April 30, 1862, and was promoted major-general of volunteers to date from April 11, 1862. He took possession of the railroad from Decatur to Stephenson, by which the control of northern Alabama was secured to the Federal authorities. He was anxious to advance into the heart of the South, but was restrained by his superior officer, Gen. Buell, and in consequence of a dispute with Buell he tendered his resignation to the secretary of war and was transferred to the command of the Department of the South, with headquarters at Hilton Head, S. C., Sept. 17, 1862. He died of yellow fever at Hilton Head, Oct. 30, 1862. VG. $125


CWCDV776.
Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony. Ambrose E. Burnside, major-general, born in Liberty, Ind. May 23, 1824, fourth son of Edgehill and Pamelia (Brown) Burnside. He was descended from Robert Burnside, a Scotchman who had fled his native country after the final defeat of the “Young Pretender”, whose cause he had espoused. During the Revolutionary war the Burnside family took different sides, and James Burnside grandfather of Ambrose, remained a loyalist during the struggle. He was forced to flee to the island of Jamaica, but returned in 1786 and died in South Carolina. His widow, after freeing her slaves, emigrated to Indiana, and her third son, Edgehill, settled in Liberty, a town which was just being built. Here he married and reared a family of nine children. Ambrose the fourth child, was sent to school until he reached the age of seventeen, obtaining a better education than was generally to be had in country schools of the time, and then, his father being too poor to give him professional training, was apprenticed to a tailor.
Through conversations with soldiers who had fought in the war of 1812 he became interested in military life, and read all the books which he could obtain which related to military affairs. While engaged in reading one of these books in his shop in Liberty, so goes the tradition, one of the patrons, Caleb B. Smith, then a congressman came into the shop, and asked the boy about his ambitions. He became interested in young Burnside and eventually succeeded in procuring for him an appointment to West Point. Upon his graduation with the class of 1847, Lieut. Burnside was ordered to the City of Mexico, where he remained on garrison duty until the return of the army, when he served at Fort Adams, at Las Vegas, where he was wounded, and at Jefferson Barracks, Mo.  In 1853 he resigned his commission as 1st lieutenant of the 3rd artillery to devote his attention to the manufacture of a breech-loading rifle which he had invented. The rifle which had been submitted in competition with some eighteen others, had received the approval of a board of commissioners appointed by
Congress, and Burnside expected an order from the government. Upon investigating, however, he was told that he would have to pay $5,000 to a professional lobbyist before the government would order any of his guns, and, as he refused indignantly to pay a sum for such a purpose, he was forced to make an assignment, and, with fifteen dollars in his pocket returned west to retrieve his fortunes. Eventually he succeeded, by dint of strictest economy, in paying off all the indebtedness incurred in the disastrous venture. After his assignment he secured a position as cashier of the land department of the Illinois Central railroad, of which his former classmate, George B. McClellan, was then vice-president, and, a year later, became treasurer of the road. Just before the outbreak of the Civil War he made a business trip to New Orleans, and, learning the state of affairs in the South, arranged his affairs, upon his return to the North so as to be ready to start at a moment’s warning for the war. He was appointed in the spring of 1861, by Gov. Sprague of Rhode Island, colonel of the 1st R. I. volunteers, and led his regiment to Washington by way of Annapolis, being one of the first to assist in the defense of the city. In the first battle of Bull Run he commanded a brigade at the beginning of the battle and succeeded to the command of Gen. Hunter’s division after that officer was wounded, winning by his services in that engagement many public testimonials and promotion to the rank of brigadier-general. Gen. Burnside won his greatest popularity, however by an expedition which he successfully led against North Carolina in the winter of 1861-62. Starting from Hampton Roads, Jan. 12, 1862, the fleet arrived at Pamlico sound after a tempestuous voyage, on Jan. 25, and on Feb. 8, after several sharp engagements, Roanoke island was captured. This gave control of Pamlico and Albemarle sounds to the northern forces, and soon, by means of a series of brilliant maneuvers, Burnside captured New Berne, Beaufort, and Fort Macon besides a number of less important points of vantage to the north and on his return was hailed as the most uniformly successful of Union generals, being appointed by President Lincoln major-general of volunteers. Gen. Burnside was next attached to the Army of the Potomac, and, with his famous 9th corps, assisted Gen. McClellan in withdrawing from the Peninsula. He next distinguished himself by dislodging the Confederates from a strong position which they held in the passes at South mountain. Lee retreated to Antietam creek, threw up entrenchments there, and waited battle. When the battle was fought, three days later, Burnside’s division which held the stone bridge across the creek in spite of fearful loss, was all that saved the Union army from complete defeat. Gen. Burnside assumed command of the Army of the Potomac when McClellan was retired, in Nov., 1862, and retained it until superseded, on Jan. 26, 1863, by Gen. Hooker, on account of the disastrous result of the battle of Fredericksburg, blame for which was placed on Burnside, and generously assumed by him. In this battle, which was fought against the advice of Gen. Burnside, the Union army was forced to attack the Confederates at a great disadvantage, the latter holding a line of hills, and being strongly entrenched. Attempts to carry the place by assault failed, and the army was forced to
withdraw with a loss of 12,000 men. After being relieved of his command Burnside resigned, but the president refused to accept his resignation, and placed him in command of the Department of the Ohio, where he rendered conspicuous service by ridding the country of guerrillas, enforcing stringent measures against Southern sympathizers on both sides of the river, and affording protection to loyalists. In Aug., 1863, he captured Cumberland gap with a force of 18,000 men, then moved on to Knoxville and held that place against siege and assault by Longstreet against terrible odds, until relieved at the end of a month by Sherman. He was again assigned to command of his old 9th corps, and in the closing operations of the war under Grant, in the Wilderness, Cold Harbor and Petersburg campaigns took a conspicuous part. The losses of his troops in the explosion of the Petersburg mine were heavy, and a court martial, called at the suggestion of Gen. Meade, judged him “answerable for want of success.” This decision was afterwards revoked, however, by a congressional commission
which investigated the matter. At the close of the war Gen. Burnside resigned his commission and retired to private life with a reputation as a patriotic, brave and able officer. He was elected governor of Rhode Island in 1866, was twice re-elected, but refused a fourth nomination and engaged again in railroad construction and management. He was in Paris at the time of the Franco-Prussian war, and acted as envoy, and, while his mission of peace was not successful, he gained the respect and admiration of both parties. He was elected to the United States Senate from Rhode Island in 1875, and re-elected in 1880. He gained prominence as a senator, proving himself as capable a statesman as he had been a soldier. Gen. Burnside died in Bristol, R. I., Sept. 3, 1881. VG. $125


CWCDV777.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General William Starke Rosecrans (1819-1898) was an inventor, coal-oil company executive, diplomat, politician, and US Army officer. He was the victor at prominent battles such as Second Corinth, Stones River, and the Tullahoma Campaign, but his military career was effectively ended following his disastrous defeat at the Battle of Chickamauga in 1863. VG. $100


CWCDV779.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. Rear Admiral Samuel Francis Dupont (1803-1865). VG. $200


CWCDV780.
Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, NY. General John Adams Dix (1798-1879). VG. $150


CWCDV786. Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E. Anthony, NY. James Shields (May 10, 1810 – June 1, 1879), American politician and United States Army officer who was born in Altmore, County Tyrone, Ireland. Shields, a Democrat, is the only person in United States history to serve as a U.S. Senator for three different states. Shields was a senator from Illinois 1849 to 1855, in the 31st, 32nd, and 33rd congresses, from Minnesota from May 11, 1858 to March 4, 1859, in the 35th congress, and from Missouri from January 27, 1879 to March 4, 1879, in the 45th congress. Shields was the nephew of another James Shields, also born in Ireland, who was a Congressman from Ohio. The younger Shields immigrated to the United States around 1826 and settled in Kaskaskia, Randolph County, Illinois where he studied and later practiced law. He served as a member of the Illinois House of Representatives, beginning to serve in 1836, and then as an Illinois Supreme Court justice and in 1839 as the state auditor. (He was elected when not yet a citizen; Illinois then required only that a legislator have been resident in the state for six months.) Shields nearly fought a duel with Abraham Lincoln on September 22, 1842. Lincoln had published an inflammatory letter in a Springfield, Illinois, newspaper, the Sagamon Journal that poked fun at Shields, the State Auditor. Lincoln’s future wife and her close friend, continued writing letters about Shields without his knowledge. Taking offense to the articles, Shields demanded “satisfaction” and the incident escalated to the two parties meeting on a Missouri island called Sunflower Island, near Alton, Illinois to participate in a duel. Lincoln took responsibility for the articles and accepted the duel. Just prior to engaging in combat, Lincoln made it a point to demonstrate his advantage by easily cutting a branch just above Shields’ head, the two participants’ seconds intervened and were able to convince the two men to cease hostilities, on the grounds that Lincoln had not written the letters. In 1846, Shields was selected as a brigadier general of volunteers to fight in the Mexican-American War. He served under Zachary Taylor along the Rio Grande River. He commanded the 3rd Brigade, Volunteer Division, at the battles of Vera Cruz and Cerro Gordo, where he was wounded. He returned to fight at the battles of Contreras and Churubusco, his brigade now part of the 4th Division. He was again wounded at the Battle of Chapultepec. Following the war, on August 14, 1848, he was nominated by President Polk, and confirmed by the United States Senate to serve as governor of Oregon Territory that was created that same day. However, he declined the position and Joseph Lane was nominated and became the first governor of the new territory. He resigned to run for the Senate from Illinois. His election was voided by the Senate on the grounds that he had not been a United States citizen for the nine years required by the United States Constitution; having been naturalized October 21, 1840. He returned to Illinois and campaigned for re-election, and won the special election to replace himself, and was then seated. In 1855, he was defeated for re-election, so he moved to Minnesota. He was elected as one of the two first Senators from that state, but his term was only from 1858 to 1859, and he was again not re-elected. He was the editor of the 1854 book, A History of Illinois, from its Commencement as a State in 1818 to 1847. Shields then moved to California and served as a brigadier general of volunteers from that state during the American Civil War. He commanded the 2nd Division of the V Corps, Army of the Potomac (subsequently part of the Army of the Shenandoah), during the Valley Campaign of 1862. He was wounded at the Battle of Kernstown on March 22, 1862, but his troops inflicted the only tactical defeat of General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson during the campaign (or the war). The day after Kernstown, he was promoted to major general, but the promotion was withdrawn, reconsidered, and then finally rejected. His overall performance in the rest of the Valley Campaign was poor enough that he resigned his commission, and his departure was not resisted by the War Department. In 1863 he moved to Mexico and operated mines, and then to Wisconsin, but in 1866 moved to Missouri, where he served as member of the Missouri State House of Representatives, and as railroad commissioner. In 1879, he was elected to fill the seat left vacant by the death of Senator Lewis V. Bogy. He served only three months and declined to run for re-election. Shields died in Ottumwa, Iowa. He is buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Carrollton, Missouri. VG. $275


CWCDV792.
Henszey & Co, Philadelphia. John W. Geary, brigadier-general, was born in Mount Pleasant, Westmoreland county, Pa., Dec. 30, 1819. He entered Jefferson college but was compelled to leave before graduation on account of his father’s sudden death and loss of property, then taught school and  was a civil engineer at the time of the outbreak of the Mexican war. He organized the “American Highlanders,” and as lieutenant-colonel of the 2nd Penn. volunteer infantry joined Gen. Scott at Vera Cruz and commanded the regiment at Chapultepec where he was twice wounded, and at Belen Gate the same day. His service won the approbation of the commanding general and he was made the first commander of the city and promoted colonel of his regiment. At the close of the war he went to California, was made first postmaster of San Francisco, and was authorized by President Polk to establish the postal service throughout California. He was elected by the people alcalde and first mayor of San Francisco, and also judge of the first instance. He was a delegate to the state constitutional convention, where he was instrumental in securing the organization of California as a free state, and upon his return to Pennsylvania he retired for several years from public life to his farm in Westmoreland county. He was appointed by President Pierce governor of Kansas in 1856, but resigned the next year upon failing to secure the state a free state constitution. Upon the outbreak of the Civil war he organized, in April, 1861, a regiment of 1,500 men and reported for duty to Gen. Banks at Harper’s Ferry, Va. He commanded in several engagements, distinguished himself and was wounded at Bolivar Heights, captured Leesburg, Va., March 8, 1862, and was made brigadier-general April 25. He was twice wounded at the battle of Cedar mountain, and on recovery was placed in command of the 2nd division of the 12th army corps, which he led in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. He was subsequently transferred to the Army of the Cumberland, in Gen. Hooker’s command, and distinguished himself at the battles of Wauhatchie and Lookout mountain. In Sherman’s march to the sea he commanded the 2nd division of the 20th army corps, was the first to enter Savannah after its evacuation, Dec. 22, 1864, and for his conduct at the capture of Fort Jackson and gallantry at Savannah, he was appointed military governor of the city. He was brevetted major-general of volunteers, Jan. 12, 1865, “for fitness to command and promptness to execute.” Upon returning to Pennsylvania in 1866, Gen. Geary was elected governor, and in 1869 he was re-elected. His administration was eminently successful, and, after his death, which occurred eighteen days after the expiration of his second term, the legislature erected a monument to his memory. Gen. Geary died in Hamburg, Pa., Feb. 8, 1873. Corners clipped o/w VG. $225


CWCDV797.
C.D. Fredricks & Co., NY. C.G. Halpin, 69th NY Militia. Residence was not listed; Enlisted on 4/20/1861 at New York City, NY as a 2nd Lieutenant. On 4/20/1861 he was commissioned into Unassigned NY 69th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 8/3/1861 at New York, NY.  (Aide-de-Camp to Colonel Hunter.) On back of CDV is written in addition, Major AAG staff of Maj. Genl. John A. Dix; Lt. Col. AAG staff of Maj. Genl. David Hunter. VG. $200


CWCDV798.
E. Anthony, NY. General Alexander McDougall McCook (1831-1903). Led 1st OH Regiment at Bull Run. VG. $125

General Michael Corcoran
CWCDV806. E. Anthony. General Michael Corcoran (1827-1863), brigadier-general, was born in Carrowkeel, Ireland, Sept. 21, 1827.  His father, a captain in the British army, gave him a good education, and procured for him a commission in the Irish constabulary in 1845. This he resigned, being unwilling to oppress his people and in 1849 he emigrated to America, locating in New York. He joined the militia there as a private, rose through the grades to the rank of colonel, 1859, and when Prince Albert of Wales visited this country, he refused to order out the regiment, the 69th, to do honor to the prince. For this he was subjected to trial by court-martial, that was still pending when the Civil war began. Upon the first call for troops, he led the 69th to the seat of war, and, being ordered to Virginia built Fort Corcoran on Arlington Heights, and then led it into the battle of Bull Run, where he fought with impetuous gallantry. He was wounded and captured, and spent nearly a year in various Confederate prisons, refusing to accept a release conditional upon his promise not to take up arms again in defense of the Union. Upon being exchanged, Aug. 15, 1862, he was commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers to date from July 21, 1861, and organized the Corcoran legion, which he commanded in the battles on the James, near Suffolk, in April, 1863, and in checking the advance of the Confederates upon Norfolk. The legion was attached to the Army of the Potomac, in Aug., 1863, and Gen. Corcoran was killed by the falling of his horse upon him while riding in company with Gen. Thomas Francis Meagher, Dec. 22, 1863. Same as CWCDV400 above but this carte is not trimmed at bottom. G+. $275


CWCDV809.
Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony. James A. Mulligan (1829-1864), colonel of the 23rd Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment. On February 20, 1865, the United States Senate confirmed the posthumous award to Colonel Mulligan of the rank of brevet brigadier general of U.S. Volunteers to rank from July 23, 1864, the day before he was mortally wounded at the Second Battle of Kernstown, near Winchester, Virginia. He commanded the Federal forces at the First Battle of Lexington in Missouri, and later distinguished himself in other engagements in the Eastern theater prior to his death in battle. Trimmed at bottom. G. $225


CWCDV810.
Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony. James A. Mulligan (1829-1864), colonel of the 23rd Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment. On February 20, 1865, the United States Senate confirmed the posthumous award to Colonel Mulligan of the rank of brevet brigadier general of U.S. Volunteers to rank from July 23, 1864, the day before he was mortally wounded at the Second Battle of Kernstown, near Winchester, Virginia. He commanded the Federal forces at the First Battle of Lexington in Missouri, and later distinguished himself in other engagements in the Eastern theater prior to his death in battle. Trimmed at top and sides. G-. $200


CWCDV814.
Autographed CDV by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony of Quincy Adams Gillmore (February 25, 1825 – April 11, 1888), civil engineer, author, and a general in the Union Army during the Civil War. He was noted for his actions in the Union victory at Fort Pulaski, where his modern rifled artillery readily pounded the fort’s exterior stone walls, an action that essentially rendered stone fortifications obsolete. He earned an international reputation as an organizer of siege operations and helped revolutionize the use of naval gunnery. The CDV is signed on the back and dated Dec. 1863. The 3 on the year has an inkblot so it may not be 1863. A Google search for Gillmore’s autograph will show you that this is a genuine signature. CDV has been trimmed at bottom. Gillmore was born and raised in Black River (now the City of Lorain) in Lorain County, Ohio. He was named after the president-elect at the time of his birth, John Quincy Adams. He entered the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, in 1845. He graduated in 1849, first in a class of 43 members. He was appointed to the engineers and was promoted to first lieutenant in 1856. From 1849 until 1852, he was engaged in constructing the fortifications at Hampton Roads in coastal Virginia. For the next four years, he was instructor of Practical Military Engineering at West Point and designed a new riding school. Beginning in 1856, Gillmore served as a purchasing agent for the Army in New York City. He was promoted to captain in 1861. With the outbreak of the Civil War in early 1861, Gilmore was assigned to the staff of Brig. Gen.Thomas W. Sherman and accompanied him to Port Royal, Virginia. After being appointed as a brigadier general, Gillmore took charge of the siege operations against Fort Pulaski. A staunch advocate of the relatively new naval rifled guns, he was the first officer to effectively use them to knock out an enemy stone fortification. More than 5,000 artillery shells fell on Pulaski from a range of 1,700 yards during the short siege, which resulted in the fort’s surrender after its walls were breached. The result of the efforts to breach a fort of such strength and at such a distance confers high honor on the engineering skill and self-reliant capacity of General Gilmore. Failure in an attempt made in opposition to the opinion of the ablest engineers in the army would have destroyed him. Success, which in this case is wholly attributable to his talent, energy, and independence, deserves a corresponding reward. -New York Tribune Although he was one of the best artillerists and engineers in the army he was not well respected by his men. After an assignment in New York City, Gillmore traveled to Lexington, Kentucky, where he supervised the construction of Fort Clay on a hilltop commanding the city. He was then assigned to replace Maj. Gen. Ormsby M. Mitchel in charge of the X Corps after that officer’s death from yellow fever. In addition, Gillmore commanded the Department of the South, consisting of North and South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, with headquarters at Hilton Head, from June 12, 1863, to May 1, 1864. Under his direction, the army constructed two earthen forts in coastal South Carolina-Fort Mitchel and Fort Holbrook, located in the Spanish Wells area near Hilton Head Island. He commanded forces that occupied Morris Island, Fort Wagner, and Fort Gregg, and also participated in the destruction of Fort Sumter. On July 18, 1863, during the siege of Charleston, South Carolina, Gillmore launched a major assault on Fort Wagner. The troops who assaulted Ft. Wagner were primarily from the 54th Massachusetts Regiment, which included only African-Americans in its complement. Gillmore had ordered that his forces be integrated and that African-Americans were not to be assigned menial tasks only, such as KP or latrine duty, but instead they were to carry arms into battle. They and their assault on Ft. Wagner were the subject of the 1989 Civil War movie Glory, which starred Morgan Freeman and Matthew Broderick. “So shortly after 6:30 p.m., on July 18, 1863, the Union Colonel Robert Gould Shaw (played by Matthew Broderick) readied the 600 men of the 54th Massachusetts regiment for an assault on Ft. Wager. Shaw was the 25 year old son of Boston abolitionists, was white, as were all his officers. Again, all the regiment’s enlisted complement were black, i.e. African-American.” [from the History Net, African American History, 54th Massachusetts Regiment]. Although he does not received attribution for his command in the credits, the African American troops in the movie “Glory” were in fact under General Gillmore’s command and were engaged in battle because of his orders ordering that they be allowed to do so. Prior that time, a 1792 law forbade African Americans from participating in the military, i.e., it forbade “persons of color from serving in the militia”. However, his troops were unable to seize Charleston. In February 1864, Gillmore sent troops to Florida under the command of General Truman Seymour. Despite orders from Gillmore not to advance into the interior of the state, General Seymour advanced toward Tallahassee, the capitol, and fought the largest battle in Florida, the Battle of Olustee, which resulted in a Union defeat. In early May, Gillmore and the X Corps were transferred to the Army of the James and shipped to Virginia. They took part in the Bermuda Hundred operations and played a principal role in the disastrous Drewry’s Bluff action. Gillmore openly feuded with his superior, Benjamin F. Butler over the blame for the defeat. Gillmore asked for reassignment and left for Washington, D.C., On July 11, 1864, Gillmore organized new recruits and invalids into a 20,000-man force to help protect the city from a threat by 10,000 Confederates under Jubal A. Early, who had reached the outer defenses of the Union capital. Gillmore was breveted as a major general of volunteers and a lieutenant colonel of engineers in the regular army. In mid-May 1865, Gillmore ordered all remaining slaves in the territory under his command to be freed; later that month he imposed martial law to enforce his orders. With the war over, he resigned from the volunteer army on December 5, 1865. Gillmore returned to New York City and became a well known civil engineer, authoring several books and articles on structural materials, including cement. He was involved in the reconstruction of fortifications along the Atlantic coast (including, ironically, some that he had destroyed as a Union general). He served on the Rapid Transit Commission that planned the elevated trains and mass public transportation, as well as leading efforts for harbor improvements and coastal defenses. He was a prominent member of the University Club of New York. His first wife died. He is reported to have married the widow of General Braxton Bragg, sometime after Bragg died in New Orleans in 1876. One of General Gillmore’s sisters, Sophia, married a Civil War officer named Daniel Seth Leslie; Leslie was from the same area near Lorain, OH, as Gillmore. Three descendants of Daniel Seth Leslie were named in General Gillmore’s honor, i.e. “Quincy Gillmore Leslie”, his son “Quincy Charles Leslie” and his son, “Quincy Gilmore Leslie”. In light of General Gillmore’s association with African American troops under his command, Daniel Leslie was assigned some responsibilities for African American veterans after the Civil War. His name (Daniel Seth Leslie) is reported to appear on a monument to African American troops in the Washington, DC area. Some African Americans carried the Gillmore and Leslie names forward. The Traveling Secretary for the Negro Leagues Kansas City Monarchs was named Quincy “J.” Jordan Gilmore. (note the change from two LL’s in Gilmore). He was nicknamed “Sect” and held that position from 1920 to 1925, with the Monarchs winning the Negro League World Series in 1924. He was born in Gary, IN, on June 29, 1882, died Feb 2, 1952. A baseball card has been published in his honor, by “Phil Dixon, 1987″. Also, there are at least two contemporary (1990’s to 2007) African American’s named Quincy Leslie, one of whom is a Sergeant in the US Air Force. General Gillmore died at Brooklyn, New York, at the age of 63. His son and grandson, both also named Quincy Gillmore, were also generals in the U.S. Army. A coal schooner named in his honor, the General QA Gillmore, sank in 1881 in Lake Erie about 45 miles west of Lorain, near Kelley’s Island. The shipwreck remains in the shallow waters of the lake. A second ship was launched bearing his name, called the “Q. A. Gillmore”. It was a steam powered tugboat “Hull #24″ built for the Great Lakes Towing Company of Cleveland, Ohio, and launched around 1912-13. She also sailed on the Great Lakes and participated in rescues of ships in the famous and infamous Great Lakes storm of 1913. She was later sold and renamed the Reiss, which was a line of Great Lakes ore and commodity carriers, but which went out of business in the 1970s or so; one such ship was the Richard Reiss. The tug Q. A. Gillmore, now named the Reiss, is still afloat, anchored and located off of Tower Marine in Saugatuk, Michigan, and about 100 yards from the retired cruise ship S.S. Keewatin. Saugatuk is on the shores of Lake Michigan. According to the owner of Tower Marine, R.J. Peterson of Saugatuk, as of the winter of 2007, her engines were still operational. The Reiss was owned by the Saugatuk Marine Museum and they donated the vessel to the Northeastern Maritime Historical Foundation of Duluth, Minnesota, sometime around May 2004. However, she is stuck in a mud bank out in the harbor and has not moved in recent years. Bottom trim o/w VG. $325

37th Regt NYNG
CWCDV846. Balz & Son, NY. Written on verso “37th Regt. NYNG Infantry.” Trimmed. G. $125


CWCDV849.
No ID. Unidentified officer. VG. $32


CWCDV863.
Philadelphia Photographic Co. General Grant. VG. $150


CWCAB18.
No ID. Signed “Compliments of D.O. Hunter U.S. Army.” General David Hunter commanded the Dept. of the South during the Civil War. He issued orders to free the slaves without authorization. Served on the Commission that tried the assassinators of Lincoln. VG. $650


CWCDV864.
Brady, New York. Thomas Francis Meagher, Irish Brigade. Rare and unique double-signed and inscribed CDV. On front Meagher signs his name and follows it with “Irish Brigade.” On back he writes: “To Miss Annie M. Stewart from Thomas Francis Meagher in return for her very beautiful bouquet presented to him on the departure of the 69th for the War.”

Thomas Francis Meagher: Residence NY; a 37 year-old Lawyer. Enlisted on 5/12/1861 at New York City, NY as a Captain. On 5/12/1861 he was commissioned into “K” Co. NY 69th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 8/3/1861 at New York, NY. On 2/3/1862 he was commissioned into US Volunteers General Staff. He Resigned on 5/15/1865. He was listed as: * Wounded 12/13/1862 Fredericksburg, VA (Wounded in leg). Promotions: * Brig-General 2/3/1862. Other Information: born 8/3/1823 in Waterford, Ireland; died 7/1/1867 in Fort Benton, MT. (Drowned in the Upper Missouri River as acting Governor of Montana Territory). Meagher, Thomas F., brigadier-general, was born in Waterford, Ireland, Aug. 3, 1823.  He attended the Jesuit college at Clongowes, Kildare, 1832-36, and then Stonyhurst College, near Preston, England, where he remained until 1843 and became one of the leaders of the revolutionary Young Ireland party in 1846. In consequence of his actions and incendiary speeches he was arrested on charge of sedition, in March, 1848 was bailed, but after the passage of the treason felony act was rearrested and sentenced to death. The sentence was subsequently commuted to banishment for life, and he was sent to Van Dieman’s island, in 1849, whence he escaped in 1852, and, coming to the United States, studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1856 and practiced in New York City until the Civil war. In 1861 he organized a company of volunteers and joined the 68th N. Y. regiment under Col. Michael Corcoran.  He was acting major of the regiment in the battle of Bull Run and had a horse shot under him; and he then returned to New York and was mustered out of the service with his regiment. In the winter of 1861-62 he recruited the Irish Brigade, was elected colonel of the 1st regiment, and on Feb. 3, 1862, was commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers and given command of the brigade. He was present at the battles of Fair Oaks, Gaines’ Mill, Malvern Hill, Frazier’s Farm, second Bull Run, Antietam, where his horse was shot under him, and Chancellorsville. At Fredericksburg he was wounded in the leg. Gen. Meagher gave up his commission after the battle of Chancellorsville, but was reappointed brigadier-general early in 1864 and commanded the district of Etowah, Ga.  In Jan., 1865, he was ordered to Savannah, Ga., where he was mustered out, May 15, 1865. After leaving the service Gen. Meagher was appointed territorial secretary of Montana, and while acting governor in the absence of Gov. Sidney Edgerton he embarked on an expedition to protect the white settlers from the Indians, and was drowned in the Missouri river, by falling off a steamboat, near Fort Benton, Mont., July 1, 1867. [Historical Data Systems, Inc.]. Corners rounded. VG. $2750


CWCDV865.
A.S. Morse, Photographer, Dep’t of the Cumberland, Nashville, Tenn. Nashville, Tenn. Hospital No. 1. Sept. 15th, 1864. Mrs. Alma Bennett, Wife Alma Wolcott of Beloit, Wis. Missionary, US Christian Commission. VG. $500

Edward Fealy, USS Roanoke
CWCDV868. No ID. Seaman Edward Fealy, USS Roanoke. Roanoke launched on 13 December 1855 at Norfolk Navy Yard; and commissioned 4 May 1857, Captain John B. Montgomery in command. Assigned to the Home Squadron as flagship, Roanoke’s first duty was to return the American filibuster and former President of Nicaragua, William Walker, and 205 of his men to the United States. Sailing for Aspinwall, Colombia, (now called Colon, Panama), on 30 May 1857, Roanoke returned on 4 August with Walker and his followers. Subsequently, Roanoke was sent to Boston Navy Yard where she decommissioned on 24 September 1857. Recommissioned on 18 August 1858, Roanoke resumed her duties as flagship of the Home Squadron. Roanoke devoted the following months to cruising in the West Indies, carrying the U.S. Minister at Bogotá, George W. Jones, to Aspinwall and Cartagena. For over a year, she was stationed at Aspinwall awaiting the arrival of a special Japanese embassy to the United States. The Japanese delegation, traveling to Washington to exchange ratifications of the 1858 treaty, departed Yokohama on 13 February 1860 in the frigate USS Powhatan and reached Aspinwall by a train across the isthmus on 25 April 1860. The Roanoke embarked the delegation and reached Hampton Roads on 12 May 1860 and was decommissioned. Following the outbreak of the American Civil War, Roanoke recommissioned on 20 June 1861. Attached to the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, she destroyed the schooner Mary off Lockwood’s Inlet, N.C., on 13 July 1861. The screw frigate subsequently took part in the capture of the schooners Albion and Alert and helped take the ship Thomas Watson off Charleston, S.C., on 15 October 1861. During the attack of the CSS Virginia (the former USS Merrimack) on Union warships in Hampton Roads, 8 March 1862, Roanoke’s deep draft prevented her from engaging the Confederate casement ram and kept her out of action the next day when the Virginia engaged the Union turreted ironclad, USS Monitor. Roanoke embarked 268 men from the USS Congress and USS Cumberland which Virginia had sunk, transported them north, and arrived at New York City on 25 March, and decommissioned the same day. Under the direction of the Chief of Naval Construction, John Lenthall and the Chief of Steam Engineering, Benjamin F. Isherwood the Roanoke began an extensive modification at Novelty Iron Works, N.Y. Roanoke was cut down to a low-freeboard ship and given three revolving Ericsson centerline turrets. Instead of the usual series of 1 in. laminated plates for hull armor, Roanoke featured one-piece 4.5 in. slabs. She kept her single funnel but landed her full ship rig, and in her new configuration was accepted by the Navy at New York Navy Yard on 16 April 1863. An ordnance report, dated 31 August 1863, listed her battery as follows: fore turret 1 x 15 in. Dahlgren smoothbore, 1 x 150-pounder rifle; middle turret 1 x 15 in. Dahlgren, 1 x 11 in. Dahlgren; after turret, 1 x 11 in. Dahlgren, 1 x 150-pounder rifle. Sea trials indicated that her heavy turrets caused her to roll dangerously in a seaway, and that her hull was not sufficiently strong to bear their weight and the concussion of the continuous firing. Recommissioned on 29 June 1863, Roanoke was assigned as harbor defense ship at Hampton Roads, Virginia, a duty she performed through the end of the Civil War. Roanoke was decommissioned on 20 June 1865 at New York Navy Yard. Retained in reserve, Roanoke’s only postwar service was as flagship of the Port Admiral at New York. Roanoke was recommissioned on 13 January 1874 and remained in reduced commission until again placed in reserve on 12 June 1875. Struck from the list on 5 August 1882, Roanoke was sold for scrapping on 27 September 1883 at Chester, Pennsylvania, to E. Stannard & Co., Westbrook, Connecticut. VG. $250


CWCDV869.
Stoutenburgh & Rolfs, Newark, N.J. Seaman John McLeod, USS Augusta. VG. $250


CWCDV870.
Stoutenburgh & Rolfs, Newark, N.J. Seaman John P. Clark, USS Commodore Read. VG. $250


CWCDV871.
No ID. Seaman James L. Hays, USS Lackawanna. VG. $250


CWCDV872.
Stoutenburgh & Rolfs, Newark, N.J. Seaman William H. Murphy, USS Lackawanna. VG. $250


CWCDV873.
No ID. Seaman William Kinney, USS Jackson. VG. $250


CWCDV877. F. Gutekunst, Philadelphia. Colonel Wistar. California Regiment. McAllister & Brother, Philadelphia 1862 copyright line. Isaac Jones Wistar. Residence Philadelphia PA; 33 years old. Enlisted on 5/21/1861 as a Captain. On 5/21/1861 he was commissioned into “A” Co. PA 71st Infantry.

He was discharged for promotion on 11/29/1862. On 11/29/1862 he was commissioned into US Volunteers General Staff. He Resigned on 9/15/1864. He was listed as: * Wounded 10/21/1861 Ball’s Bluff, VA; Antietam. Promotions: * Lt Colonel 5/21/1861; * Colonel 10/22/1861; * Brig-General 11/29/1862. Intra Regimental Company Transfers: * 5/21/1861 from company A to Field & Staff. Other Information: born 11/14/1827 in Philadelphia, PA; died 9/18/1905 in Claymont, DE. Isaac J. Wistar was born in 1827 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He received early his education at Westtown Friends’ School, and then attended the Haverford College. Wistar also received a Doctor of Science degree from the University of Pennsylvania. After graduating Wistar took up studying law, and then began practicing as a lawyer within Philadelphia. In 1849 he relocated to California in order to participate as a miner in the Gold Rush. From then on until the outbreak of the American Civil War in 1861, Wistar held a great variety of vocations. Among these were: as an animal trapper, a mountaineer, as an Indian fighter, a farmer, and then once again practicing law. At the beginning of the American Civil War in 1861, Wistar chose to follow his home state and the Union cause. He raised a company of men and was elected its captain. Wistar’s company was then added to the 71st Pennsylvania Infantry, originally known as the California Regiment. This regiment was organized at Fort Schuyler located in New York. On June 28 Wistar was promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel, and on July 1 the 71st left for Fortress Monroe on the Virginia Peninsula. On July 22 Wistar and the 71st was then ordered to Washington, D.C., forming part of the capital’s defenses until that fall. Wistar participated in the much-publicized Union defeat in the Battle of Ball’s Bluff on October 21. In the fight he temporarily led the regiment and was seriously wounded, hit in his right elbow, his jaw, and thigh. Following the death of Col. Edward D. Baker at Ball’s Bluff, Wistar became the commander of the 71st Pennsylvania, promoted to colonel on November 11, 1861. The 71st participated in the Peninsular Campaign of 1862, although it isn’t clear whether Wistar was actually present; at the Battle of Seven Pines (May 31 and June 1) the regiment was led by its major, and during the Seven Days Battles (June 30 and July 1) commanded by its lieutenant colonel. Wistar fought in the Battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862, and was wounded in his left arm. His commander, Oliver O. Howard, reported on Wistar’s new injuries, saying “…with his right arm nearly useless from a former wound, had his left disabled.” referring to the previous Ball’s Bluff wounds. On November 29 Wistar was promoted to brigadier general, and he was assigned to brigade command in the VII Corps beginning on May 16, 1863. Beginning on July 18, 1863, Wistar commanded the District of Yorktown in Virginia, and that August the post was re-designated as a subdistrict of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina. In April 1864 he briefly was given divisional command of the XVIII in the Army of the James. On May 7 Wistar resumed leading a brigade and participated in the Bermuda Hundred Campaign, but eleven days later he was relieved of duty and replaced by Col. Griffen Stedman.Military historian Ezra J. Warner surmises Wistar performed poorly during this campaign, saying:

The conclusion is more or less inescapable, although nothing concrete appears in the records, that Wistar’s handling of his brigade on the foggy morning of May 16 left something to be desired.

Wistar’s resignation from the Union Army was accepted by the U.S. War Department on September 15, 1864. After resigning, Wistar resumed his law practice in Philadelphia, and he also was a noted penologist. He served as vice president of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, leading its coal and canal components. Wistar founded the Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology at the University of Pennsylvania in 1892, and also served as Inspector of the Pennsylvania State Penitentiary, both located in Philadelphia. He also served as president of the following organizations; the Pennsylvania State Board of Charities, the American Philosophical Society, and the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia.Wistar also authored several works, including an autobiography and writings about war and penology. He retired in 1903 and died two years later at his summer home located in Claymont, New Castle County, Delaware. He was buried in Laurel Hill Cemetery in Philadelphia. VG. $450


CWCDV878.
J.D. Wells, Northampton, Mass. J.E. Nash, Amherst, Mass. Jay E. Nash. Residence Hadley MA; an 18 year-old Farmer. Enlisted on 9/10/1861 as a Private. On 9/20/1861 he mustered into “D” Co. MA 27th Infantry. He Re-enlisted on 11/25/1863. He was Mustered Out on 6/26/1865 at New Berne, NC. He was listed as: * Wounded 7/16/1864 Petersburg, VA; * POW 3/8/1865 Southwest Creek, NC; * Exchanged 3/27/1865 (place not stated). Promotions: * Sergt. VG. $150


CWCDV881.
L.L. Pollard, Car near Union House, Montpelier, Vt. Itinerant, traveling photographer. “Yours-D.O. MacKenzie,” partially removed by loss of revenue stamp. On card is written “Masters Mate, USN.” Trimmed at bottom. G. $100


CWCDV883.
T.F. Saltsman, Nashville, Tenn. Identified on verso as “J. Riley.” There are a lot of ‘J. Rileys’ and I don’t know who this one is. 3-cent tax cancelled stamp on verso. VG. $100


CWCDV885.
No ID. Chief Engineer Alban C. Stimers, USN, (1827-1876). Alban C. Stimers was born in New York in 1827. He entered the Navy as a Third Assistant Engineer in January 1849 and became a Chief Engineer in July 1858. He served in the steam frigate Roanoke during the early months of the Civil War and later in 1861 was assigned to work with John Ericsson on the construction of the ironclad turret ship Monitor. Though not formally a member of Monitor‘s complement, Stimers took part in her difficult voyage from New York to Hampton Roads, Virginia, and served on board during her historic battle with the Confederate ironclad Virginia on 9 March 1862. Much of the success of these two operations was due to his inspired work, and Chief Engineer Stimers continued an intimate association with the Navy’s ironclad shipbuilding program for much of the rest of the Civil War. In 1862-63, Stimers again worked with Ericsson during the building of the next class of monitor-type ironclads, the Passaic class. He accompanied these ships during early operations against the Confederacy, most notably the 7 April 1863 bombardment of Fort Sumter, in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, and helped repair them after that action. Later in the year he was placed in charge of an ambitious project to construct twenty light-draft monitors for use in shallow inland waters. Unfortunately, the displacement calculations made for these ships were badly done. The resulting Casco class turned out to be useless for their intended role and had to be extensively modified. Stimers had inadvertently demonstrated the inherent difficulty of successfully shepherding complex technological endeavors, something that has bedeviled “project managers” from his time to ours’. After the Casco class debacle, Stimers returned to the seagoing Navy. At the beginning of 1865, he was Chief Engineer of the steam frigate Wabash. He resigned from the Navy in August 1865 and thereafter worked as a civilian engineer. Alban C. Stimers died in 1876. 3-cent tax stamp on verso. While this image is identified as Stimers on verso, the image that I have found on the web appears to show a somewhat older man with more of a receding hairline. I will price this at half of what I normally would have because of my uncertainty on it. Fair. $125

J.G. Bacon, US Navy
CWCDV888. Bogardus, NY. Written on back “I am my dear John Yours &c, J.G. Bacon, US Navy.” There was an Acting Assistant Surgeon with this name on the Bark “Midnight.” VG. $150


CWCDV889.
No ID. Signed at bottom “Geo. S. Cochran, U.S.N.” On back “Acting Ensign Geo. S. Cochran, U.S. Navy. Cairo Ills, July 18th, 1862.” Acting Ensign Jan 24, 1863; Appointment revoked (sick) Oct. 22, 1863. Top corners clipped. VG. $135


CWCDV890.
Chute y Brooks, Montevideo. On back “Your Friend E.T. Muhany?, Lt. Comd. USN.” Signature is hard to decipher so I cannot figure out who this Navy man is. G. $95


CWCDV891.
J.W. Black, Boston. Signed on verso “Joseph Watson, U.S. Navy.” I have found two men with this name: Watson, Joseph.
Acting Assistant Paymaster, 18 August, 1862. Honorably discharged 7 November, 1865 and Watson, Joseph. Acting Ensign, 1 October, 1862. Acting Master, 16 September, 1863. Discharged 14 September, 1865. Further research needed to determine who this is. Corners clipped. G. $125


CWCDV892.
Webster & Bro., Louisville. On back is written “ID’ed in album, Capt. G.W. Riley, 10th KY.” George W. Riley. Residence was not listed;
Enlisted on 9/23/1861 at Lebanon, KY as a Captain. On 11/21/1861 he was commissioned into “D” Co. KY 10th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 12/6/1864 at Louisville, KY. VG. $165


CWCDV893.
C.D. Fredricks & Co., NY, Havana, Paris. Signed “W.N. Griswold, USN.” Griswold, William N.
Acting Master, 9 July, 1861. Honorably discharged 18 September, 1865. Served on the Mount Vernon. VG. $145


CWCDV894.
E.H. Paige, Buffalo, NY. On back is written “Yours truly John Kelly, 1867, US Navy.” Kelly, John P. Third Assistant Engineer, 24 August, 1861. Second Assistant Engineer, 21 April, 1863. First Assistant Engineer, 11 October, 1866. Chief Engineer, 12 March, 1883. Died 27 January, 1890. VG. $165


CWCDV895.
Lot of 2 CDVs of the same man. Both are by T.M.V. Doughty, Winsted, Ct., although one has no backmark. But comparison to other Doughty CDVs shows the same carpet in the studio. Hiram Eddy was chaplain for the 2nd Connecticut Volunteers (90 days service) at Bull Run, where he was captured with a rifle in his hand. He was reported to have preached a sermon the night before urging the soldiers to “show no quarter, take sure aim and shoot to kill.” These facts made the Confederates less agreeable to the “chaplains are noncombatants” rule, and Reverend Eddy was the first prisoner of Libby Prison POW camp. He was prisoner of five different POW camps before he was released a year later. Residence Winchester CT; Enlisted on 7/15/1861 as a Chaplain. On 7/15/1861 he was commissioned into Field & Staff CT 2nd Infantry. He was discharged (date not stated);  (Estimated day of muster). He was listed as: * POW 7/21/1861 Bull Run, VA (Paroled); * Confined 7/23/1861 Richmond, VA (Liggon Tobacco factory); * Paroled 7/26/1862 (place not stated) (Returned to State no further record). VG. $325

Sam Magill, Iowa Infantry
CWCDV901. No ID. On back is written “Sam Magill, Lieut. Col. 26th Reg. Iowa Infantry.” Samuel G. Magill. Residence Lyons IA; 29 years old. Enlisted on 8/10/1862 as a Lieut. Colonel. On 9/30/1862 he was commissioned into Field & Staff IA 26th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 12/1/1862.
Other Information: born in Pennsylvania. G. $150


CWCDV902.
No ID. On back is written “George Johnson, Capt. of Co. B, 26th Reg. Iowa Infantry. George W. Johnson. Residence Clinton IA; 24 years old. Enlisted on 8/5/1862 as a Captain. On 9/30/1862 he was commissioned into “C” Co. IA 26th Infantry. He Resigned on 2/26/1863. Other Information: born in New York. G. $150


CWCDV903.
No ID. Written on back “Milo Smith, Col. of 26th regiment Iowa Infantry.” Milo Smith. Residence Clinton IA; 43 years old. Enlisted on 8/10/1862 as a Colonel. On 9/30/1862 he was commissioned into Field & Staff IA 26th Infantry. He Resigned on 1/28/1865. He was listed as: * Wounded 1/11/1863 Arkansas Post, AR (Wounded severely); * Wounded 5/19/1863 Walnut Hills, MS. Other Information: born in Vermont. G. $225


CWCDV904.
Perkins & Co., Washington, DC. On back is written “Morgan, W. Newfield, NY.” This is likely William L. Morgan. Residence was not listed; 47 years old. Enlisted on 7/24/1863 at Elmira, NY as a Captain. On 7/31/1863 he was commissioned into “A” Co. NY 1st Vet Cavalry. He was killed on 2/20/1864 at Upperville, VA. VG. $225


CWCDV905.
G.W. Barnes, Rockford, Ill. Signed on back “Dan Corcoran.” Daniel Corcoran. Residence Rockford IL. Enlisted on 8/1/1862 as a 2nd Lieutenant. On 8/1/1862 he mustered into “A” Co. IL 90th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 6/6/1865 at Washington, DC. Promotions: * 1st Lieut. 3/6/1862 (Not Mustered commission canceled); * Capt 3/6/1862. Fair. $135


CWCDV906.
R.A. Lewis, NY. Inscribed and signed on back “To John & Charity, from their Brother, Wm. Earle.” William Earle, Acting Master, 17 December, 1861. Honorably discharged 15 January, 1866. William Earle was the Acting Master of the USS Merrimac when she sunk. USS Merrimac was a sidewheel steamer first used in the Confederate States Navy that was captured and used in the United States Navy during the Civil War. Merrimac was purchased in England for the Confederate government in 1862. After a successful career as a blockade runner, she was captured by USS Iroquois off the coast of Cape Fear River, North Carolina, 24 July 1863. Purchased by the Navy from New York Prize Court 10 March 1864, Merrimac commissioned at New York 1 May 1864, Acting Master William P. Rogers in command. After joining the East Gulf Blockading Squadron in June 1864, she was ordered to cruise in the Gulf of Mexico. She captured Cuban sloop Henretta sailing from Bayport, Florida, with cotton for Havana. However, late in July yellow fever broke out among Merrimac’s crew and she sailed north to allow her crew to recover. Upon arriving in New York she debarked her sick sailors at quarantine, and got underway for a cruise in the northwest Atlantic as far as St. John’s Newfoundland. Early in 1865 Merrimac was reassigned to the East Gulf Blockading Squadron. She got underway for the gulf early in February, but encountered extremely bad weather which forced her to stop at Beaufort, North Carolina, on the 7th and at Charleston, South Carolina on the 12th. Underway for Key West the next day, Merrimac ran into still worse weather which she fought until turning north on the 14th to seek the first port. On the afternoon of 15 February 1865, Acting Master William Earle ordered the crew to abandon ship after its tiller had broken, two boilers given out and the pumps failed to slow the rising water. That night, when the crew had been rescued by mail steamer Morning Star, Merrimac was settling rapidly as she disappeared from sight. Trimmed top and bottom. G. $300


CWCDV907.
W.R. Phipps, Lexington, Ky. Signed “Geo. T. Stagg, Capt. 21st Ky Inf. Vols.” George T. Stagg. Residence was not listed. Enlisted on 11/2/1861 at Camp Hobson, KY as a 1st Lieutenant. On 1/2/1862 he was commissioned into “D” Co. KY 21st Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 1/4/1865. VG. $175


CWCDV913.
No ID. Written on front “Father Trecy Chaplain.” Rev Jeremiah (also know as John) F. Trecy. Born in Ireland in 1836. He labored in Nebraska from June 24 1855 to 1860; New Orleans 1860-61; Huntsville, Alabama in attendance at Confederate hospital barracks, 1861-62. In March 1857 he lectured in New York City to induce Irish settlers to come to Nebraska. At the end of his lecture he was severely denounced by Archbishop Hughes who disapproved of his plans. Also served as chaplain on General Rosecrans staff. One of the few Irish priests that served both the Union and Confederate soldiers. Trimmed. G. $200


CWCDV914.
J. Gurney & Son, NY. 2nd Lt. Fredrick J. James, 3rd U.S. Cavalry, served as ordnance officer. Killed at Cold Spring, NY in unspecified accident, Aug. 1864. VG. $175

Sergeant 5th Corps
CWCDV917. Miller & Rowell, Boston, Unidentified Sergeant wearing 5th Corps, Army of the Potomac badge. VG. $125


CWCDV918.
Miller & Rowell, Boston. Unidentified soldier wearing 5th Corps, Army of the Potomac badge. He holds his glasses in his hand. 3-cent, cancelled tax stamp on verso. VG. $100


CWCDV937.
Bowdoin, Taylor & Co., Alexandria, Va. Unidentified surgeon with sword. VG. $175


CWCDV940.
Wolff’s Gallery, Alexandria, Va. Dr. George Franklin French (1837-1921), surgeon on Grant’s staff; surgeon in chief, 1st Div., 15th Corps. VG. $200

Alex Smalley
CWCDV946. Barcalow, NY. Faintly written name on the front appears to be “Alex Smalley.” Alexander K. Smalley. Residence was not listed; 21 years old. Enlisted on 5/29/1862 at New York City, NY as a Private. On 5/29/1862 he mustered into “E” Co. NY 37th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 9/2/1862 at New York, NY. G. $50

NYSM
CWCDV954. J. Gurney & Son, NY. On back is written “9 Regt. NYSM.” G. $45


CWCDV956.
J.E. McClees, Philadelphia. Written on back “Egan.” VG. $45


CWCDV960.
No ID. Unidentified soldier. VG. $35


CWCDV963.
W.T. Worthington, Photographer and Ambrotypist, New Albany, [Indiana]. Peter W. Fitzgerald, Co. I, 128 Indiana Infantry. Civil War Database indicates the following on a “Peter Fitzgerald”: Residence La Crosse WI. Enlisted on 3/7/1864 as a Private. On 3/7/1864 he mustered into “I” Co. IN 128th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 4/10/1866. But copies of his records which accompanies this CDV indicate significant differences. He was born in Ireland. His enlistment date on the records is Dec. 1, 1863, enlisted at South Bend, Ind. He spent a great deal of time in many hospitals, suffering from scurvy, rheumatism, curvature of the spine, etc. Update 2/11/12: I have just received the following information from a collector: “I believe that cwcdv963 may actually be Paley Fitzgerald of the 59th Indiana due to his veteran stripe on the sleeve and location of the studio. Paley was from New Albany and re-enlisted on 1/1/1864.” Card has a horizontal crease as shown. Fair. $125


CWCDV964.
[O.D. Finch]. Shirley House and dugouts of the 45th Ill. Infantry, siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, 1863. During the siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, the Shirley House, residence of Unionist “Judge” James Shirley and his family, was caught in the crossfire of Union troops led by Ulysses S. Grant and Confederate troops under John C. Pemberton. Surrendering to Union forces, the family was removed from their home to protect them from cannon fire and housed in a manmade cave, like the ones (called sheebangs) in this photograph. The siege ended after six weeks when Pemberton, who was responsible for the city’s residents and more than 200,000 Confederate soldiers (many ill with disease and starvation), surrendered Vicksburg to the Union Army. The Union thereby gained complete control of the Mississippi River. The Shirleys retained their estate until 1902, when it was given to the National Park Service and became the Vicksburg National Military Park. G. $950


CWCDV967. Gayford & Speidel, Rock Island, Ill. Written on verso “Yours Truly Edward A. Martin, Capt. 108th U.S.C.I.” Residence was not listed. Enlisted on 9/20/1864 at Louisville, KY as a Captain. On 9/20/1864 he was commissioned into “D” Co. US CT 108th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 3/21/1866. Corners clipped. VG. $175


CWCDV968.
No ID. Signed on recto “Yours very truly, Chas. J. Maginnis.” Charles J. Maginnis. Residence Sandusky IA; 24 years old. Enlisted on 8/4/1862 as a Captain. On 9/23/1862 he was commissioned into “D” Co. IA 30th Infantry. He Resigned on 2/3/1863. Other Information: born in New York. G. $125


CWCDV969.
No ID. On album page is written “1st Lieut. M. Connor, Co. C, 2 I.C.” Michael Connor. Residence Allen’s Grove IA; 26 years old. Enlisted on 8/14/1861 as a 2nd Lieutenant. On 9/1/1861 he was commissioned into “C” Co. IA 2nd Cavalry. He was Mustered Out on 10/3/1864 at Davenport, IA. Promotions: * 1st Lieut 12/1/1861. Other Information: born in Canada. VG. $200


CWCDV970.
Judkins, Haverhill, Mass. Signed on verso “Edward H. Morrill, 1st Lt. “B” Company, 61st Mass Vol.” Edward H. Morrill. Residence Haverhill MA; a 19 year-old Clerk. Enlisted on 8/1/1862 as a Private. On 8/17/1862 he mustered into “G” Co. MA 35th Infantry. He was discharged for promotion on 9/24/1864. On 9/26/1864 he was commissioned into “B” Co. MA 61st Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 6/4/1865. He was listed as: * Wounded 9/17/1862 Antietam, MD. Promotions: * Sergt; * 2nd Lieut 4/5/1863 (Declined commission); * 1st Lieut 9/22/1864 (As of Co. B 61st MA Inf) * Capt 4/9/1865 by Brevet. VG. $250


CWCDV971.
Le Rue Lemer, Harrisburg, Pa. Signed on recto “Yours very Respect’y W. Amos McNulty.” William A. McNulty. Residence was not listed; 24 years old. Enlisted on 4/26/1861 at New York City, NY as a Private. On 4/27/1861 he mustered into “A” Co. NY 10th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 5/6/1863 at New York, NY. He was listed as: * Wounded 12/13/1862 Fredericksburg, VA (Severe wound in right arm, amputated).
Promotions: * 1st Sergt; * Corpl 7/28/1861; * Sergt 4/1/1862. 2-cent tax stamp on verso. VG. $300


CWCDV973.
G.W. Rider. On verso is written “Unknown New York Cavalry Officer. Note appearance of his right eye. Perhaps a glass eye, resulting from a wound? G.W. Rider (Photographer) Ondawa House, Salem, New York.” With slip of paper from Alexander Autographs, Inc. the reads “(Wounded Union Officer). Fine carte de visite picturing a wounded Union Officer, his right eye, undoubtedly a glass eye, sunken, the eye socket dark and lower than his left eye. The officer is in military garb, with guantlets, sword, and hat with “Jeff Davis” on the table beside him.” VG. $150


CWCDV977.
Davis, Hartford, Conn. This lot consists of a CDV and a quarter plate Tintype of Richard K. Woodruff. Residence New Haven CT. Enlisted on 8/11/1862 as a Corporal. On 8/25/1862 he mustered into “I” Co. CT 15th Infantry. He was discharged for promotion on 3/23/1865. On 3/23/1864 he was commissioned into “C” Co. US Colored Troops 31st Infantry. He was wounded at Petersburg July 30, 1864 and died of tetanus on 8/11/1864 after his removal to David’s Island, New York. He was listed as: * Wounded 7/30/1864 Petersburg, VA (Severe wound in left elbow). Promotions: * Capt 3/23/1864 (As of Co. C 31st USCT Infantry). With photocopies of image and Woodruff and info page on him from Yale in the Civil War, by Ellsworth Elliot Jr., Yale Press, 1932. VG. [case] $1200


CWCDV978.
[E. Anthony]. This CDV  is the same image as Anthony stereoview No. 816. Georgetown (Washington) from Camp Cameron. Soldiers wearing white belts, the 7th NY State Militia, 1861. No backmark, rare in this format. G. $250

Huntsville, Ala.
CWCDV987. Robinson & Murphy, Artists, Huntsville, Ala. Signed at bottom “Lt. J. Mahoney, USA.” Josiah Mahoney. Residence was not listed; 27 years old. Enlisted on 7/1/1864 as a 2nd Lieutenant. On 7/1/1864 he was commissioned into “D” Co. TN 8th Cavalry. He was Mustered Out on 9/11/1865 at Knoxville, TN. Corners clipped. G. $250


CWCDV988.
T.M. Schleier, Nashville, Tennessee. Signed “Very Truly HA Kelly, Lt. & ??” Henry A. Kelly. Residence was not listed; Enlisted on 2/6/1864 as a 1st Lieutenant. On 5/14/1864 he was commissioned into Field & Staff TN 8th Cavalry. He was Mustered Out on 9/11/1865 at Knoxville, TN. Promotions: * 1st Lieut 5/14/1864 (1st Lieut & Quartermaster). 2-cent cancelled tax stamp on verso. VG. $250


CWCDV989.
Morse’s Gallery of the Cumberland, Nashville, Tenn. Signed “Your truly, A.J. Gahagan.” Sgt. Andrew T. Gahagan. Residence was not listed; 21 years old. Enlisted on 4/1/1862 as a Sergeant. On 11/1/1862 he mustered into “D” Co. TN 1st Cavalry. He was Mustered Out on 4/15/1865. Promotions: * 2nd Lieut; * 1st Lieut 2/1/1864. 3-cent cancelled tax stamp on verso. VG. $$225


CWCDV990.
Morse’s Gallery of the Cumberland, Nashville, Tenn. “Capt. David Rush, Co. C, 8th Tenn Cav. Vols.” inscribed at top of image. Residence was not listed; 35 years old. Enlisted on 9/9/1863 as a 2nd Lieutenant. On 9/9/1863 he was commissioned into “C” Co. TN 4th Infantry. He was discharged for promotion on 6/5/1864. On 6/5/1864 he was commissioned into “C” Co. TN 8th Cavalry. He Resigned on 6/18/1865. Promotions:
* Capt 6/5/1864 (As of Co. C 8th TN Cavalry). Trimmed top and bottom. G. $185

Drummer Boy
CWCDV997. Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony. Robert Henry Hendershot, the “Drummer Boy of the Rappahannock,” the drummer boy for the 8th Michigan. VG. $650


CWCDV999.
Armstead & Taylor, Artists, Corinth, Miss. Signed “Your Truly William M. Peters, 1st Lieut Co. “F” 2nd W.T. I. of A.D.” Residence Galena IL; Enlisted on 8/3/1861 as a Private. On 8/3/1861 he mustered into “D” Co. IL 12th Infantry. He was discharged for promotion on 6/30/1863
(Estimated date of discharge). On 6/30/1863 he was commissioned into “F” Co. US CT 61st Infantry. He was discharged on 5/11/1864. Promotions:
* 1st Lieut 6/30/1863 (As of Co. F 61st USCT Inf (est date)). VG. $250


CWCDV1007.
Munn & Faul, Ambrotype & Photographic Artists, Cairo, Ill. Written on bottom of card “Paymaster Davis, U.S.N.” 2-cent cancelled tax stamp on verso. George Leonard Davis. Paymaster, 16 April, 1861. Pay Inspector, 3 March, 1871. Retired List, 17 January, 1881. Died 3 December, 1884. Born in Massachusetts; appointed from Wisconsin April 16, 1861. Attached to steam-sloop Pensacola, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-4; receiving-ship, Cairo, Ill, 1865; steam-sloop Pensacola, North Pacific Squadron, 1866-7; Fleet Paymaster, North Pacific Squadron, 1868-9. VG. $250


CWCDV1008.
No ID. Signed “Your Truly, Washington Fullen, 1st Lt. 61st U.S. C. Inf.” Residence was not listed; Enlisted on 6/30/1863 as a 2nd Lieutenant. On 6/30/1863 he was commissioned into “F” Co. US CT 61st Infantry. He Resigned on 6/27/1865 (Estimated date of commission). Promotions: * 1st Lieut. VG. Partial tax stamp on verso. $250


CWCDV1011.
S.M. Fassett, Chicago, Ill. Written on back is “Singer.” VG. $95


CWCDV1014.
Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony. General Hooker (1814-1879). WIA Antietam. Brady’s 1862 copyright line bottom recto. G. $125

McPherson & Oliver Dismounting Guns after Surrender, Port Hudson McPherson & Oliver Dismounting Guns after Surrender, Port Hudson
CWCDV1019. McPherson & Oliver, Baton Rouge, La. Dismounting our Guns after the surrender of Port Hudson. VG. $650

McPherson & Oliver Rebel Field Battery, Port Hudson McPherson & Oliver Rebel Field Battery, Port Hudson
CWCDV1020. McPherson & Oliver. Rebel Field Battery ?? at Port Hudson. VG. $600

Lieutenant Harry Anderson 6th US Infantry Lieutenant Harry Anderson 6th US Infantry
CWCDV1021. Buchwalter & Jackson, Circleville, Ohio. Signed on verso “Lt. Harry Anderson, Charleston, S.C. March 1868. His infantry cap has a “6” on it. This is 2nd Lt. Harry R. Anderson, 6th US Infantry, aide-de-camp. Henry (Harry) R. Anderson, 1844-1918, is the son of explorer/writer William Marshall Anderson and the nephew of Major (Col.) Robert Anderson who surrendered Fort Sumter. During 1867-68, he was in Charleston “On special duty at Fort Headquarters” according to the officer roster. Circleville, Ohio, was Harry’s family home; it is now a National Historic Site. Harry was also the grandson of an early governor of Ohio, Duncan McArthur. His paternal mother, Sarah Marshall, was a cousin of both Chief Justice John Marshall and William Rogers Clark, as in Lewis and Clark. VG. $250

Signal Tower overlooking Antietam Album Card  Signal Tower overlooking Antietam Album Card
CWCAB19. Brady’s Album Gallery. No. 607.  Signal Tower, on Elk Mountain, overlooking Battle-Field of Antietam. Album card. Alexander Gardner’s 1862 copyright line bottom recto. G+. $350

Professor Lowe Inflating Balloon Intrepid  Professor Lowe Inflating Balloon Intrepid
CWCAB20. Brady’s Album Gallery. No. 423. Professor Lowe Inflating Balloon Intrepid to Reconnoiter Battle of Fair Oaks. Alexander Gardner’s 1862 copyright line bottom recto. VG. $850

William Devereaux, Colored Infantry  William Devereaux, Colored Infantry
CWCDV1024. Washington Gallery, Vicksburg, Miss. Signed on front “Your Truly, W.? Devereaux, Capt. USA.” William Devereaux, US CT 47 Inf., Co. “G.” This Colored Infantry officer enlisted on 5/1/1863 as a Captain and was dismissed on 7/18/1864. On back is written “Salem, Mass.” G. $200

Civil War CDV  Civil War CDV
CWCDV1027. No ID. Mystery CDV with what appears to be “Last of old Train” written on bottom recto. G. $75

William DeHart Quinby, US Navy  William DeHart Quinby, US Navy
CWCDV1029. F. Gutekunst, Philadelphia. Written on verso “DeHart G. Quinby, U.S. Navy now of the U.S. Army, 5th Infantry, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.” This is William DeHart Quinby (9/1/1849-3/10/1873) who following his time in the U.S. Navy went on to become a 2nd Lieutenant in the 5th Infantry in Kansas. G. $125

E. Thompson, Naval Officer  E. Thompson, Naval Officer
CWCDV1030. Higgins & Co, Boston. Written on back “E. Thompson.” Union Naval Officer. G. $50

Rear Admiral Selfridge  Rear Admiral Selfridge
CWCDV1032. Bradley & Rulofson, successors to R.H. Vance, San Francisco. Rear Admiral Thomas O. Selfridge (24 April 1804 – 15 October 1902) was an officer in the United States Navy during the Mexican–American War and the American Civil War and was the father of Thomas O. Selfridge, Jr. Selfridge was appointed midshipman on 1 January 1818. Promoted to Lieutenant in 1827, he served in the East India, Mediterranean, and Pacific Squadrons. He took command of sloop Dale, in May 1847 and participated in the capture of Mazatlán and Guaymas. Badly wounded in the latter engagement, he was invalided home in June 1848. He was subsequently assigned to the Boston Navy Yard, where he remained until 1861. He commanded Mississippi, flagship of the Gulf Squadron, on blockade duty off Mobile, Alabama and off the passes of the Mississippi River. His old wound forced him to relinquish his command in February 1862, and he served ashore until retiring in 1866. He was a member of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States and the Military Order of Foreign Wars. Rear Admiral Selfridge died in Waverly (now part of Belmont, Massachusetts). VG. $100

General Grant CDV by Gurney General Grant CDV by Gurney
CWCDV1033. Gurney & Son, NY. General Grant. E. $250

General McClellan & Wife General McClellan & Wife
CWCDV1054. R.W. Addis, Photographer, McClees’ Gallery, Washington, DC. Maj. Gen. G.B. McClellan & Lady. 1862 copyright line. VG. $150

General McClellan & Wife
CWCDV1055. No ID. General McClellan and wife. G. $125

General US Grant General US Grant
CWCDV1056. E&HT Anthony. General U.S. Grant. VG. $150

Big Spring, Huntsville. Alabama 1864 Big Spring, Huntsville. Alabama 1864
CWCDV1059. Armstead & Taylor, Artists, Corinth, Miss. Big Spring, Huntsville, Alabama, 1864. Note encampment in distance. VG. $425

txinscription001
The following CDVs CWCDV1061 through CWCDV1070 came from a Civil War album from Texas with the above inscription at the front of the album. “Presented by J.A. Maltby to Willie & annie–1887. Hondo City, Texas. Sabinal Canon.” I am indebted to Jim Crain for the identification of this difficult to read name and for information related to the name Maltby as well as to Larry Jones for additional information. Jim writes: “…there are a number of websites…some connecting the name with Texas Rangers and C.S.A.  Some mention a Captain Jeff Maltby.  I can’t be sure that any of these are your guy, but maybe scrutinizing these sites will lead to a connection….Larry Jones’ book “Civil War and Revolution on the Rio Grande Frontier” has a brief mention of William H. Maltby and Henry Maltby in connection with Brownsville, but nothing about Medina County. ” Another search found “Maltby to be a publisher of the Medina County News, 1885.”  Larry writes: “Maltby is a name that is in the Civil War & Rev. book.  I think you’ll find an entry on him in the Handbook of Texas online.  I checked my own book because I remember we reproduced a photo of one of the two Maltby brothers who resided in Brownsville and Matamoros during the war.  There is a CDV of William Maltby and two other men on p. 45.  His brother, Henry, published a pro-Confederate newspaper in Matamoros, Mexico when the Union Army occupied Brownsville.  The newspaper connection fits.  I think the Maltby’s originally were from Corpus Christi or moved there after the war.  I’ve visited the old downtown cemetery there and photographed one of the Malby Bros. tombstone.  DePlanque is buried in the same cemetery.” Additionally, Larry writes: “I read the two entries in the Handbook of Texas.  One for William Jeff Maltby and the other for Henry.  My sense of it is that there is no connection between the Texas Ranger named Maltby and the other Maltbys.  Note that Henry had five children and I’d bet money that J.A. Maltby is one of them.”

Major General Franklin Gardner Major General Franklin Gardner
CWCDV1061. Theo. Lilienthal’s Photographic Gallery, New Orleans, La. Major General Franklin Kitchell Gardner (January 29, 1823 – April 29, 1873), Confederate general noted for his service at Port Hudson on the Mississippi. Gardner built extensive fortifications at this important garrison, 16,000 strong at its peak. But he was at the mercy of conflicting orders, and found himself besieged and greatly outnumbered. His achievement at holding out for 47 days before surrendering has been praised by military historians. The photographer, Theodore Lilienthal saw service in the Confederate Army.  He served as a cannoneer with the famous “Washington Artillery” of New Orleans. This image of Gardner was taken two months after his surrender of Port Hudson, La.  He was technically a prisoner of war at the time the CDV was taken, but, Gardner was given freedom of movement in New Orleans.  Both sides did that for their generals.  They seldom locked them up.  In fact, he would later be paroled and would resume his Confederate Army career. [Thanks to Larry Jones for information on this CDV.] VG. $1200

Confederate General J.E.B. Stuart Confederate General J.E.B. Stuart
CWCDV1062. E&HT Anthony, New York. Confederate General J.E.B. Stuart. James Ewell Brown “Jeb” Stuart (February 6, 1833 – May 12, 1864) was a United States Army officer from the state of Virginia who later became a Confederate States Army general during the Civil War. He was known to his friends as “Jeb”, from the initials of his given names. Stuart was a cavalry commander known for his mastery of reconnaissance and the use of cavalry in support of offensive operations. While he cultivated a cavalier image (red-lined gray cape, yellow sash, hat cocked to the side with an ostrich plume, red flower in his lapel, often sporting cologne), his serious work made him the trusted eyes and ears of Robert E. Lee’s army and inspired Southern morale. Stuart graduated from West Point in 1854 and served in Texas and Kansas with the U.S. Army, a veteran of the frontier conflicts with Native Americans and the violence of Bleeding Kansas. He participated in the capture of John Brown at Harpers Ferry. Resigning when his home state of Virginia seceded, he served first under Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley, but then in increasingly important cavalry commands of the Army of Northern Virginia, playing a role in all of that army’s campaigns until his death. He established a reputation as an audacious cavalry commander and on two occasions (during the Peninsula Campaign and the Maryland Campaign) circumnavigated the Union Army of the Potomac, bringing fame to himself and embarrassment to the North. At the Battle of Chancellorsville, he distinguished himself as a temporary commander of the wounded Stonewall Jackson’s infantry corps. Arguably Stuart’s most famous campaign, Gettysburg, was marred when he was surprised by a Union cavalry attack at the Battle of Brandy Station and by his separation from Lee’s army for an extended period, leaving Lee unaware of Union troop movements and arguably contributing to the Confederate defeat at the Battle of Gettysburg. Stuart received significant criticism from the Southern press as well as the postbellum proponents of the Lost Cause movement, but historians have failed to agree on whether Stuart’s exploit was entirely the fault of his judgment or simply bad luck and Lee’s less-than-explicit orders. During the 1864 Overland Campaign, Union Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan’s cavalry launched an offensive to defeat Stuart, who was mortally wounded at the Battle of Yellow Tavern. His widowed wife wore black for the rest of her life in remembrance of her deceased husband. VG. $650

Confederate General John Hunt Morgan Confederate General John Hunt Morgan
CWCDV1063. E&HT Anthony, New York. John Hunt Morgan (June 1, 1825 – September 4, 1864), Confederate general and cavalry officer in the Civil War, posed with his wife. Morgan is best known for Morgan’s Raid when, in 1863, he and his men rode over 1,000 miles covering a region from Tennessee, up through Kentucky, into Indiana and on to southern Ohio. This would be the farthest north any uniformed Confederate troops penetrated during the war. G. $400

Confederate General A.P. Hill Confederate General A.P. Hill
CWCDV1064. E&HT Anthony, New York. Ambrose Powell Hill, Jr. (November 9, 1825 – April 2, 1865), was a career U.S. Army officer in the Mexican–American War and Seminole Wars and a Confederate general in the Civil War. He gained early fame as the commander of the “Light Division” in the Seven Days Battles and became one of Stonewall Jackson’s ablest subordinates, distinguishing himself in the 1862 battles of Cedar Mountain, Second Bull Run, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. Following Jackson’s death in May 1863 at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Hill was promoted to lieutenant general and commanded the Third Corps of Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, which he led in theGettysburg Campaign and the fall campaigns of 1863. His command of the corps in 1864–65 was interrupted on multiple occasions by illness, from which he did not return until just before the end of the war, when he was killed during the Union Army offensive at the Third Battle of Petersburg. G. $350

Confederate General Jubal Early Confederate General Jubal Early
CWCDV1065. No ID. Jubal Anderson Early (November 3, 1816 – March 2, 1894) was a lawyer and Confederate general in the Civil War. He served under Stonewall Jackson and then Robert E. Lee for almost the entire war, rising from regimental command to lieutenant general and the command of an infantry corps in the Army of Northern Virginia. He was the Confederate commander in key battles of the Valley Campaigns of 1864, including a daring raid to the outskirts of Washington, D.C. The articles written by him for the Southern Historical Society in the 1870s established the Lost Cause point of view as a long-lasting literary and cultural phenomenon. G. $400

Confederate General Stonewall Jackson Confederate General Stonewall Jackson
CWCDV1066. E&HT Anthony, New York. Thomas Jonathan “Stonewall” Jackson (January 21, 1824 – May 10, 1863) was a Confederate general during the Civil War, and one of the best-known Confederate commanders after General Robert E. Lee. His military career includes the Valley Campaign of 1862 and his service as a corps commander in the Army of Northern Virginia under Robert E. Lee. Confederate pickets accidentally shot him at the Battle of Chancellorsville on May 2, 1863. The general survived with the loss of an arm to amputation, but died of complications from pneumonia eight days later. His death was a severe setback for the Confederacy, affecting not only its military prospects, but also the morale of its army and of the general public. Jackson in death became an icon of Southern heroism and commitment, becoming a mainstay in the pantheon of the “Lost Cause”. Military historians consider Jackson to be one of the most gifted tactical commanders in U.S. history. His Valley Campaign and his envelopment of the Union Army right wing at Chancellorsville are studied worldwide even today as examples of innovative and bold leadership. He excelled as well in other battles; the First Battle of Bull Run (First Manassas) where he received his famous nickname “Stonewall”, Second Bull Run (Second Manassas), Antietam, and Fredericksburg. Jackson was not universally successful as a commander, however, as displayed by his weak and confused efforts during the Seven Days Battles around Richmond in 1862. G. $300

Confederate General Fitzhugh Lee Confederate General Fitzhugh Lee
CWCDV1067. E&HT Anthony, New York. Fitzhugh Lee (November 19, 1835 – April 28, 1905) was a Confederate cavalry general in the Civil War, the 40th Governor of Virginia, diplomat, and United States Army general in the Spanish-American War. He was the son of Sydney Smith Lee, a captain in the Confederate States Navy, and the nephew of General Robert E. Lee. G. $300

Major General Leonidas Polk Major General Leonidas Polk
CWCDV1068. Negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony, New York. Leonidas Polk (April 10, 1806 – June 14, 1864) was a Confederate general in the Civil War who was once a planter in Maury County, Tennessee, and a second cousin of President James K. Polk. He also served as bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Louisiana and was for that reason known as Sewanee’s Fighting Bishop. He is often erroneously named “Leonidas K. Polk.” He had no middle name and never signed any documents as such. The errant “K” was derived from his listing in the post-bellum New Orleans press as “Polk, Leon. (k)” for killed in action. Polk was one of the more successful, yet controversial political generals of the war, elevated to a high military position with no prior combat experience because of his friendship with Confederate President Jefferson Davis. He fought as a corps commander in many of the major battles of the Western Theater, but is remembered more for his bitter disagreements with his immediate superior, Gen. Braxton Bragg of the Army of Tennessee, than for his success in combat. While serving under the command of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, he was killed in action in 1864 during the Atlanta Campaign. G. $300

Confederate General Breckinridge Confederate General Breckinridge
CWCDV1069. E&HT Anthony, New York. John Cabell Breckinridge (January 16, 1821 – May 17, 1875) was a lawyer and politician from Kentucky. He represented the state in both houses of Congress and in 1857, became the 14th and youngest-ever Vice President of the United States (1857–1861). Serving in the U.S. Senate at the outbreak of the Civil War, he was expelled after joining the Confederate Army. He remains the only Senator of the United States convicted of treason against the United States of America by the Senate. He was appointed Confederate Secretary of War late in the war. A member of the Breckinridge family, he was the grandson of U.S. Attorney General John Breckinridge, son of Kentucky Secretary of State Cabell Breckinridge, and father of Arkansas Congressman Clifton R. Breckinridge. After non-combat service in the Mexican–American War, Breckinridge was elected as a Democrat to the Kentucky House of Representatives in 1849 where he took a states’ rights position against legal interference with slavery. Elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1851, he allied with Stephen A. Douglas in support of the Kansas–Nebraska Act. After reapportionment in 1854 made his re-election unlikely, he declined to run for another term. He was nominated for vice-president at the 1856 Democratic National Convention to balance a ticket headed by Pennsylvanian James Buchanan. The Democrats won the election, but Breckinridge had little influence with Buchanan and, as presiding officer of the Senate, could not express his opinions in that body’s debates. In 1859, he was elected to succeed U.S. Senator John J. Crittenden at the end of Crittenden’s term in 1861. After Southern Democrats walked out of the 1860 Democratic National Convention, the party’s northern and southern factions held rival conventions in Baltimore, Maryland that nominated Stephen Douglas and Breckinridge, respectively, for president. Breckinridge carried most of the southern states but no northern states and lost the election. Taking his seat in the Senate, he urged compromise to preserve the Union although seven states had already seceded. Unionists took control of the state legislature when Kentucky’s neutrality was breached, but Breckinridge fled behind Confederate battle lines where he was commissioned a brigadier general; he was then expelled from the Senate. After the April 1862 Battle of Shiloh, he was promoted to major general, and in October he was assigned to the command of Braxton Bragg. After Bragg charged that Breckinridge’s drunkenness had contributed to Confederate defeats at Stone River and Missionary Ridge, he was transferred to the Trans-Allegheny Department, where he won his most significant victory at the Battle of New Market. After participating in Jubal Early’s 1864 campaigns in the Shenandoah Valley, he was charged with defending Confederate supplies in Tennessee and Virginia. In February 1865, Confederate President Jefferson Davis appointed him Secretary of War. Concluding that the war was hopeless, he urged Davis to arrange a national surrender. After the fall of the Confederate capital at Richmond, he ensured the preservation of Confederate military and governmental records. He then fled to Cuba, Great Britain, and finally, to Canada. In exile, he toured Europe from August 1866 to June 1868. When President Andrew Johnson extended amnesty to all former Confederates in late 1868, he returned to Kentucky, but resisted all encouragement to resume his political career. Issues from war injuries sapped his health, and after two operations, he died on May 17, 1875. G. $250

Confederate General Pemberton Confederate General Pemberton
CWCDV1070. No ID. John Clifford Pemberton (August 10, 1814 – July 13, 1881), was a career United States Army officer who fought in the Seminole Wars and with distinction during the Mexican–American War. He also served as a Confederate general during the Civil War, noted for his defeat and surrender in the critical Siege of Vicksburg in the summer of 1863. G. $150

1st Wisconsin Heavy Artillery 1st Wisconsin Heavy Artillery
CWCDV1080. New Gem Gallery, Alexandria, Va. Seely & Murphy, Proprietors. Signed “J.B. Thurston, Almand, Portage Co., Wis.” This gem tintype is of Private Joseph B. Thurston, Co. E, 1st WI Heavy Artillery. VG. $175

1st Wisconsin Heavy Artillery 1st Wisconsin Heavy Artillery
CWCDV1081. New Gem Gallery, Alexandria, Va. Seely & Murphy, Proprietors.  Signed “Martin Craig, Co. E, 1st H.A. Wis Vol.,” on verso. This gem tintype is of Private Martin Craig, Co. E, 1st WI Heavy Artillery. VG. $175

1st Wisconsin Heavy Artillery 1st Wisconsin Heavy Artillery
CWCDV1082. New Gem Gallery, Alexandria, Va. Seely & Murphy, Proprietors. Signed “J. Hecker.” This gem tintype is of Private John Hecker, Co. E, 1st WI Heavy Artillery. VG. $175

Civil War Soldier Gem Tintype Civil War Soldier Gem Tintype
CWCDV1089. New Gem Gallery, Alexandria, Va. Seely & Murphy, Proprietors. This unidentified gem tintype came from the same album that contained images of identified soldiers from the 1st WI Heavy Artillery regiment. VG. $100

Civil War Soldier Gem Tintype Civil War Soldier Gem Tintype
CWCDV1090. New Gem Gallery, Alexandria, Va. Seely & Murphy, Proprietors. This unidentified gem tintype came from the same album that contained images of identified soldiers from the 1st WI Heavy Artillery regiment. VG. $100

Civil War Soldier Gem Tintype Civil War Soldier Gem Tintype
CWCDV1091. New Gem Gallery, Alexandria, Va. Seely & Murphy, Proprietors. This unidentified gem tintype came from the same album that contained images of identified soldiers from the 1st WI Heavy Artillery regiment. VG. $100

Civil War Soldier Gem Tintype Civil War Soldier Gem Tintype
CWCDV1092. New Gem Gallery, Alexandria, Va. Seely & Murphy, Proprietors. This unidentified gem tintype came from the same album that contained images of identified soldiers from the 1st WI Heavy Artillery regiment. VG. $100

Civil War Soldier Gem Tintype Civil War Soldier Gem Tintype
CWCDV1093.  New Gem Gallery, Alexandria, Va. Seely & Murphy, Proprietors. This unidentified gem tintype came from the same album that contained images of identified soldiers from the 1st WI Heavy Artillery regiment. VG. $100

US Grant US Grant
CWCDV1094. E.W. Peirce, Galena, Ill. General Ulysses S. Grant. 2-cent tax stamp on verso. G. $125

General Sherman General Sherman
CWCDV1095. No ID. General William Tecumseh Sherman. G. $50

George Shorkley Wounded at Antietam George Shorkley Wounded at Antietam
CWCDV1096. J.H. Lakin, Montgomery, Ala. “Capt. George Shorkley of the 51 Infantry, Ft. Garland.” Signed “Yours Faithfully Geo. Shorkley Capt. 51 Inf.??.” From CW Research database: Residence was not listed; Enlisted on 10/9/1861 as a 1st Lieutenant. On 10/9/1861 he was commissioned into “H” Co. PA 51st Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 7/27/1865  (Subsequent service in US Army from 02/23/1866 until  retiring 09/23/1885). He was listed as: * Wounded 9/17/1862 Antietam, MD (Wounded in arm). Promotions: * Adjutant 6/6/1862 * Capt 4/22/1864 (As of Co. H) * Major 7/30/1864 by Brevet (Petersburg, VA) * Lt Colonel 3/25/1865 by Brevet (Fort Stedman, VA) * Colonel 4/9/1865 by Brevet * Capt 3/2/1867 by Brevet (Antietam, MD) * Major 3/2/1867 by Brevet (Fort Stedman, VA). Intra Regimental Company Transfers: * 6/6/1862 from company H to Field & Staff * 4/22/1864 from Field & Staff to company H. Other Information: born in New York. G. $250

Gustavus A. Patchke USN Gustavus A. Patchke USN
CWCDV1097. L.V. Newell’s Photograph Gallery, Pt. Lookout, Md. Gustavus A. Patchke, Acting Ensign. Signed on verso. G. $100

Commander Belknap USN Commander Belknap USN
CWCDV1099. Pun-Lun, Photographer & Ivory Painter, Hong Kong. Commander George Eugene Belknap, U.S. Navy. U.S. Ship Hartford, Hong Kong, China, Sept. 1867. This was taken during the Formosa Expedition in 1867. Belknap went on to become Commodore and then Rear Admiral. G. $250

Thomas G. Grove USN Thomas G. Grove USN
CWCDV1100. Pun-Lun, Photographer & Ivory Painter, Hong Kong. Signed Thos. G. Grove, S.S. Massachusetts?, Hong Kong China, Sept. 14th, 1867.” This is Thomas G. Grove, born in NJ.Appears to be a Lieut although he wasn’t a Lieut until Mar 21 ’70 and this was taken during the Formosa Expedition in 1867. He was born in NJ, served on the S.S. Monocacy as part of the Asiatic Squadron, 1873-1876. He died July 26, 1881 and is buried in Barrancas National Cemetery in Pensacola, FL. G. $150

Thomas N. Penrose USN Thomas N. Penrose USN
CWCDV1101. Pun-Lun, Photographer & Ivory Painter, Hong Kong. Signed “Yours Truly Ths. N. Penrose U.S.N.” This is Thomas N. Penrose, Assistant Surgeon (24 Jan ’62); Surgeon (28 May ’71); Medical Inspector (25 Jan ’89); Medical Director (28 Feb ’96). Born in PA. Probably taken during the Formosa Expedition in 1867. G. $200

Edwards & His Dog USN Edwards & His Dog USN
CWCDV1102. Pun-Lun, Photographer & Ivory Painter, Hong Kong. Written on verso “Edwards and His Dog-Saki.” USN. G. $150 

 

Other Civil War-related CDVs are listed on the Political CDV page.