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AA7. Charles D. Fredricks & Co., NYC. Nathaniel Parker Willis (1806-1867). American poet and author. Lived at Idlewild on the Hudson. CDV. VG. $75

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AA18.
Elliott & Fry, London. Matthew Arnold (1822-1888). Noted English poet and critic. CDV. Two corners chipped. VG. $25

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AA22.
Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony. Charles Dickens. CDV. VG. $200

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AA29.
Pierre Petit, Paris. Alphonse Carr (1808-1890). French philosopher, journalist, and writer. He wrote “The more things change, the more things stay the same.” CDV. VG. $50


AA53.
Brady, published by E&HT Anthony. Horace Greeley (1811-1872). Journalist, established the NY Tribune in 1841, served as its editor for 30 years. Active abolitionist and feminist. CDV. VG. $135


AA59.
Elliott and Fry, London. Alfred Lord Tennyson (1809-1892). Great English poet. CDV. VG. $75


AA87.
Black, Boston. Edward Everett Hale (1822-1909). American author and Unitarian clergyman. Author of “The Man Without a Country.” CDV. VG. $150


AA109.
Sarony, NY. Cabinet Card of Josh Billings, the pen name of Henry Wheeler Shaw (1818-1885). VG. $125


AA112.
E&HT Anthony. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 –-March 24, 1882), American poet and educator whose works include “Paul Revere’s Ride”, The Song of Hiawatha, and Evangeline. He was also the first American to translate Dante Alighieri’s The Divine Comedy and was one of the five Fireside Poets. CDV. VG. $65


AA119.
Brady’s National Photographic Portrait Galleries, NY & Washington DC. Bayard Taylor (January 11, 1825 – December 19, 1878), American poet, literary critic, translator, and travel author. CDV. VG. $85


AA121.
D. Appleton & Co., NY. Charles Dickens (1812-1870). CDV. VG. $150


AA122.
E&HT Anthony. Victor Hugo (1802-1885). French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, statesman, etc. CDV. VG. $125


AA123.
J. Gurney & Son, NY. William Makepeace Thackeray (18 July 1811 – 24 December 1863), English novelist of the 19th century. He was famous for his satirical works, particularly Vanity Fair, a panoramic portrait of English society. CDV. VG. $60


AA125.
D. Appleton & Co., NY. Henry Theodore Tuckerman (April 20, 1813 – December 17, 1871), American writer, essayist and critic. Tuckerman was born in Boston, Massachusetts. He was a sympathetic and delicate critic, with a graceful style. He wrote extensively both in prose and verse. He travelled much in Italy, which influenced his choice of subjects in his earlier writings. These include The Italian Sketch-book (1835), Isabel, or Sicily: A Pilgrimage (1839); two volumes of verse, Poems (1851) and A Sheaf of Verse (1864); Thoughts on the Poets (1864), The Book of the Artists (1867), Leaves from the Diary of a Dreamer, etc. He was prominent in the literary life of New York City after 1845. CDV. VG. $65


AA126.
Negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony. John Lothrop Motley (1814-1877), American historian. CDV. G. $75


AA127.
D. Appleton & Co., NY. George William Curtis (1824-1892), American writer, public speaker; political editor of Harper’s Weekly. CDV. VG. $75


AA128.
D. Appleton & Co., NY. Charles Mackay (1814-1889), Scottish poet, journalist and song writer. Wrote Extraordinary Popular Delusions & the Madness of Crowds in 1841. CDV. VG. $75


AA134.
Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony. George Dennison Prentice was the editor of the Louisville Journal, which he built into a major newspaper. He attracted readers by satire as well as exaggerated reporting and support of the Know-Nothing Party in the 1850s. His writing was said to contribute to rabid anti-Catholic and anti-foreigner sentiment, and a riot in 1855. During the Civil War, he created and wrote about a fictional guerrilla “Sue Mundy,” whose activities he used to taunt the Union military commander of the state. CDV. VG. $125


AA135.
Wm. H. Guild, Jr. Fanny Fern. Sara Willis Parton (1811-1872); American writer, 1st woman to have a regular newspaper column (NY Ledger); highest paid columnist in the US in 1855. CDV. VG. $225


AA139.
No ID. Eliza Cook (1818 – 1889) was an English author, Chartist poet and writer. CDV. G. $15

Anthony Trollope  Anthony Trollope
AA144. 
Elliott & Fry, Portman Square. Anthony Trollope (1815-1882). English novelist. CDV. VG. $150

Nathaniel Hawthorne Nathaniel Hawthorne
AA151. Brady’s National Photographic Portrait Galleries, New York & Washington, D.C. Nathaniel Hawthorne.  This CDV was previously the property of Sidney Strober and was part of Lot 272 in the Strober Auction of Feb. 7, 1970, held at the Parke-Bernet Gallery in NYC. Nathaniel Hawthorne (July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was an American novelist, dark romantic, and short story writer. His works often focus on history, morality, and religion. He was born in 1804 in Salem, Massachusetts, to Nathaniel Hathorne and the former Elizabeth Clarke Manning. His ancestors include John Hathorne, the only judge involved in the Salem witch trials who never repented of his actions. He entered Bowdoin College in 1821, was elected to Phi Beta Kappa in 1824, and graduated in 1825. He published his first work in 1828, the novel Fanshawe; he later tried to suppress it, feeling that it was not equal to the standard of his later work. He published several short stories in periodicals, which he collected in 1837 as Twice-Told Tales. The next year, he became engaged to Sophia Peabody. He worked at the Boston Custom House and joined Brook Farm, a transcendentalist community, before marrying Peabody in 1842. The couple moved to The Old Manse in Concord, Massachusetts, later moving to Salem, the Berkshires, then to The Wayside in Concord. The Scarlet Letter was published in 1850, followed by a succession of other novels. A political appointment as consul took Hawthorne and family to Europe before their return to Concord in 1860. Hawthorne died on May 19, 1864, and was survived by his wife and their three children. Much of Hawthorne’s writing centers on New England, many works featuring moral metaphors with an anti-Puritan inspiration. His fiction works are considered part of the Romantic movement and, more specifically, dark romanticism. His themes often center on the inherent evil and sin of humanity, and his works often have moral messages and deep psychological complexity. His published works include novels, short stories, and a biography of his college friend Franklin Pierce, the 14th President of the United States. VG. $150

Fannie Fern Fannie Fern
AA154. Gurney, NY. Fanny Fern. Sara Willis Parton (1811-1872); American writer, 1st woman to have a regular newspaper column (NY Ledger); highest paid columnist in the US in 1855. This CDV was previously the property of Sidney Strober and was part of Lot 272 in the Strober Auction of Feb. 7, 1970, held at the Parke-Bernet Gallery in NYC. Trimmed at bottom. G. $225

Fanny Fern Fanny Fern
AA155. Wm. H. Guild, Jr. Fanny Fern. Sara Willis Parton (1811-1872); American writer, 1st woman to have a regular newspaper column (NY Ledger); highest paid columnist in the US in 1855. This CDV was previously the property of Sidney Strober and was part of Lot 272 in the Strober Auction of Feb. 7, 1970, held at the Parke-Bernet Gallery in NYC. Trimmed at bottom. G. $200

Grace Greenwood Grace Greenwood
A156. Case & Getchell, Boston. Sara Jane Lippincott, known as Grace Greenwood, born on September 23, 1823, in Pompey, New York. Grace Greenwood became a popular poet, children’s scribe and journalist who was The New York Times’ first female writer. She was a staunch abolitionist and champion of women’s rights, actively hitting the lecture circuit, and lived in Europe for a time. The author of many books, including a biography of Queen Victoria, Greenwood died on April 20, 1904. This CDV was previously the property of Sidney Strober and was part of Lot 272 in the Strober Auction of Feb. 7, 1970, held at the Parke-Bernet Gallery in NYC. G. $100

Harriet Beecher StoweHarriet Beecher Stowe
AA157. Howell, NY. Harriet Beecher Stowe was born on June 14, 1811, in Litchfield, Connecticut. Her father, Lyman Beecher, was a leading Congregationalist minister and the patriarch of a family committed to social justice. Stowe achieved national fame for her anti-slavery novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, which fanned the flames of sectionalism before the Civil War. Stowe died in Hartford, Connecticut, on July 1, 1896. This CDV was previously the property of Sidney Strober and was part of Lot 272 in the Strober Auction of Feb. 7, 1970, held at the Parke-Bernet Gallery in NYC. G. $125

Oliver Optic Oliver Optic
AA160. Warren’s Portraits, Boston. William Taylor Adams, aka Oliver Optic. William Taylor Adams (July 30, 1822 – March 27, 1897), pseudonym Oliver Optic, was a noted academic, author, and a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives.  This CDV was previously the property of Sidney Strober and was part of Lot 272 in the Strober Auction of Feb. 7, 1970, held at the Parke-Bernet Gallery in NYC. VG. $125

James Parton James Parton
AA161. Gurney & Son, NY. James Parton. James Parton (February 9, 1822 – October 17, 1891) was an English-born American biographer who wrote books on the lives of Horace Greeley, Aaron Burr, Andrew Jackson, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and Voltaire. This CDV was previously the property of Sidney Strober and was part of Lot 272 in the Strober Auction of Feb. 7, 1970, held at the Parke-Bernet Gallery in NYC. VG. $125

Fitz-Greene Halleck Fitz-Greene Halleck
AA164. Charles D. Fredricks & Co., NY. Fitz-Greene Halleck (July 8, 1790 – November 19, 1867) was an American poet notable for his satires and as one of the Knickerbocker Group. Born and reared in Guilford, Connecticut, he went to New York City at the age of 20, and lived and worked there for nearly four decades. He was sometimes called “the American Byron”. His poetry was popular and widely read but later fell out of favor. It has been studied since the late twentieth century for its homosexual themes and insights into nineteenth-century society. In 1832, Halleck, a cultural celebrity, started working as personal secretary and advisor to the philanthropist John Jacob Astor, who appointed him as one of the original trustees of the Astor Library. Given an annuity by Astor’s estate, in 1849 Halleck retired to Guilford, where he lived with his sister Marie Halleck for the remainder of his life. This CDV was previously the property of Sidney Strober and was part of Lot 272 in the Strober Auction of Feb. 7, 1970, held at the Parke-Bernet Gallery in NYC.  G. $65

Fitz-Greene Halleck Fitz-Greene Halleck
AA165. Charles D. Fredricks & Co., NY. Fitz-Greene Halleck (July 8, 1790 – November 19, 1867) was an American poet notable for his satires and as one of the Knickerbocker Group. Born and reared in Guilford, Connecticut, he went to New York City at the age of 20, and lived and worked there for nearly four decades. He was sometimes called “the American Byron”. His poetry was popular and widely read but later fell out of favor. It has been studied since the late twentieth century for its homosexual themes and insights into nineteenth-century society. In 1832, Halleck, a cultural celebrity, started working as personal secretary and advisor to the philanthropist John Jacob Astor, who appointed him as one of the original trustees of the Astor Library. Given an annuity by Astor’s estate, in 1849 Halleck retired to Guilford, where he lived with his sister Marie Halleck for the remainder of his life. This CDV was previously the property of Sidney Strober and was part of Lot 272 in the Strober Auction of Feb. 7, 1970, held at the Parke-Bernet Gallery in NYC. VG. $65

Fitz-Greene Halleck Fitz-Greene Halleck
AA166. Charles D. Fredricks & Co., NY. Fitz-Greene Halleck (July 8, 1790 – November 19, 1867) was an American poet notable for his satires and as one of the Knickerbocker Group. Born and reared in Guilford, Connecticut, he went to New York City at the age of 20, and lived and worked there for nearly four decades. He was sometimes called “the American Byron”. His poetry was popular and widely read but later fell out of favor. It has been studied since the late twentieth century for its homosexual themes and insights into nineteenth-century society. In 1832, Halleck, a cultural celebrity, started working as personal secretary and advisor to the philanthropist John Jacob Astor, who appointed him as one of the original trustees of the Astor Library. Given an annuity by Astor’s estate, in 1849 Halleck retired to Guilford, where he lived with his sister Marie Halleck for the remainder of his life. This CDV was previously the property of Sidney Strober and was part of Lot 272 in the Strober Auction of Feb. 7, 1970, held at the Parke-Bernet Gallery in NYC. VG. $65

Fitz-Greene Halleck Fitz-Greene Halleck
AA167. Photographic Negative from Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E. Anthony, NY. Fitz-Greene Halleck (July 8, 1790 – November 19, 1867) was an American poet notable for his satires and as one of the Knickerbocker Group. Born and reared in Guilford, Connecticut, he went to New York City at the age of 20, and lived and worked there for nearly four decades. He was sometimes called “the American Byron”. His poetry was popular and widely read but later fell out of favor. It has been studied since the late twentieth century for its homosexual themes and insights into nineteenth-century society. In 1832, Halleck, a cultural celebrity, started working as personal secretary and advisor to the philanthropist John Jacob Astor, who appointed him as one of the original trustees of the Astor Library. Given an annuity by Astor’s estate, in 1849 Halleck retired to Guilford, where he lived with his sister Marie Halleck for the remainder of his life. This CDV was previously the property of Sidney Strober and was part of Lot 272 in the Strober Auction of Feb. 7, 1970, held at the Parke-Bernet Gallery in NYC. VG. $65

Jacob Abbott Jacob Abbott
AA171. Warren’s Portraits, Boston. Jacob Abbott (November 14, 1803 – October 31, 1879), an American writer of children’s books. He wrote over 200 books. This CDV was previously the property of Sidney Strober and was part of Lot 272 in the Strober Auction of Feb. 7, 1970, held at the Parke-Bernet Gallery in NYC. G. $50

Ralph Waldo Emerson Ralph Waldo Emerson
AA172. E&HT Anthony. Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, and poet, who led the Transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States. This CDV was previously the property of Sidney Strober and was part of Lot 272 in the Strober Auction of Feb. 7, 1970, held at the Parke-Bernet Gallery in NYC. VG. $65

 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
AA177. No ID. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet and educator whose works include “Paul Revere’s Ride”, The Song of Hiawatha, and Evangeline. He was also the first American to translate Dante Alighieri’s The Divine Comedy and was one of the five Fireside Poets. This CDV was previously the property of Sidney Strober and was part of Lot 272 in the Strober Auction of Feb. 7, 1970, held at the Parke-Bernet Gallery in NYC. G. $75

George Sand by Nadar George Sand by Nadar
AA187. Nadar, Paris. Cabinet Card of George Sand (Amantine-Lucile-Aurora Dupin, July 1, 1804-June 8, 1876). French novelist and memoirist noted for her well publicized romances with artists including Chopin. VG. $250

Victor Hugo aa193b
AA193. Carjat. Victor Hugo (1802-1885). French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, statesman, etc. CDV. G. $85

Henry Jarvis Raymond
AA194. Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony. Henry Jarvis Raymond (1820-1860), co-founder of the NY Times. CDV. VG. $75


AA196. Benque, Paris. Pierre Loti (pseudonym of Louis Marie-Julien Viaud; 14 January 1850 – 10 June 1923) was a French naval officer and novelist, known for his exotic novels. Chipped corner top right. Cabinet Card. G. $75


AA197. No ID. Great CDV published by the American Literary Bureau, Agency for Lecturers, Readers & Singers, Cooper Institute, NY titled The Lecture Platform. Composite of 45 illustrious individuals including Susan B. Anthony, Mark Twain, Wilkie Collins, Harriet Beecher Stowe, etc. VG. $150


AA199. C.D. Fredricks & Co., NY. Donald Grant Mitchell (April 12, 1822 – December 15, 1908) was an American essayist and novelist who usually wrote under the pen name Ik Marvel. Mitchell, the grandson of politician and jurist Stephen Mix Mitchell, was born in Norwich, Connecticut. He graduated from Yale College in 1841, where he was a member of Skull and Bones and studied law, but he soon took up literature. Throughout his life he showed a particular interest in agriculture and landscape gardening, which he followed at first in pursuit of health. He served as U.S. consul at Venice, Italy, from 1853 to 1854, and in 1855 he settled at his estate, called Edgewood, near New Haven, Connecticut. He was best known as the author (under the pseudonym of “Ik Marvel”) of the sentimental essays contained in the volumes Reveries of a Bachelor, or a Book of the Heart (first published in book form in 1850) and Dream Life, a Fable of the Seasons (1851). Reveries of a Bachelor examines the dream-like lives Americans were living at the time. It was one of the top best sellers of its time but has received little attention from 19th century literary critics. In the text, Ik Marvel theorizes on boyhood, country life style, marriage, travel, and dreaming. Dream Life, a Fable of the Seasons, was dedicated to Washington Irving, to whom Mitchell was introduced by Lewis Gaylord Clark. Irving said of the dedication: “Though I have a great disinclination in general to be the object of literary oblations and compliments… I have enjoyed your writings with such peculiar relish and have been so drawn toward the author by the qualities of head and heart evinced in them, that I confess I feel gratified by the dedication”. Mitchell produced books of travel and volumes of essays on rural themes including Reveries of a Bachelor (1850), My Farm of Edgewood: A Country Book (1863), sketchy studies of English monarchs and of English and American literature, and a character novel entitled Doctor Johns (1866). His other works include About Old Story-tellers (1878) and American Lands and Letters (1897–99). Reveries of a Bachelor was one of poet Emily Dickinson’s favorite books. Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., called him “one of the pleasantest of our American writers.” VG. $100


AA200. Photographic negative from Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony. John Godfrey Saxe I (June 2, 1816 – March 31, 1887) was an American poet known for his re-telling of the Indian parable “The Blind Men and the Elephant,” which introduced the story to a Western audience. He also said “Laws, like sausages, cease to inspire respect in proportion as we know how they are made.” Trimmed at bottom. CDV. G. $85


AA202. C.D. Fredricks & Co., NY. Bayard Taylor (January 11, 1825 – December 19, 1878), American poet, literary critic, translator, and travel author. CDV. VG. $100


AA204. J.E. Tilton & Co. Photographed by Black, Boston. Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, and poet, who led the Transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States. G. $35


AA206. E&HT Anthony. Sara Jane Lippincott, known as Grace Greenwood, born on September 23, 1823, in Pompey, New York. Grace Greenwood became a popular poet, children’s scribe and journalist who was The New York Times’ first female writer. She was a staunch abolitionist and champion of women’s rights, actively hitting the lecture circuit, and lived in Europe for a time. The author of many books, including a biography of Queen Victoria, Greenwood died on April 20, 1904. G. $125


AA207. Edward Anthony. Alfred Lord Tennyson (1809-1892). Great English poet. CDV. G. $75


AA208. Pair of CDVs of Longfellow and his wife. Longfellow is by Black & Case, Boston and has a cancelled tax stamp on verso. Mrs. Longfellow is by Silsbee, Case & Co., published by Williams & Everett, Boston. G. $100


AA209. Note on verso says “Brady neg.” William Cullen Bryant (November 3, 1794 – June 12, 1878) was an American romantic poet, journalist, and long-time editor of the New York Evening Post. Mounted on thin card. VG. $65


AA210. C.D. Fredricks & Co., NY. William Cullen Bryant (November 3, 1794 – June 12, 1878) was an American romantic poet, journalist, and long-time editor of the New York Evening Post. E. $85


AA211. Starr, [Philadelphia]. Interesting CDV by Starr of Richard Harding Davis dressed as a tough. Showing how he disguised himself to get a story. Richard Harding Davis (April 18, 1864 – April 11, 1916) was an American journalist and writer of fiction and drama, known foremost as the first American war correspondent to cover the Spanish–American War, the Second Boer War, and the First World War. His writing greatly assisted the political career of Theodore Roosevelt. He also played a major role in the evolution of the American magazine. His influence extended to the world of fashion, and he is credited with making the clean-shaven look popular among men at the turn of the 20th century. G. $75


AA214. Randall, Detroit, Michigan. Ednah Dow Littlehale Cheney (June 27, 1824 – November 19, 1904) was an American writer, reformer, and philanthropist.

She was born on Beacon Hill, Boston, June 27, 1824; and was educated in private schools in Boston. Cheney served as secretary of the School of Design for Women in Boston from 1851 till 1854. She married portrait artist Seth Wells Cheney on May 19, 1853. His ill-health limited his volume of work and after a winter trip abroad (1854-1855) he died in 1856. They had one child, Margaret.

Cheney’s life was devoted to philosophic and literary research and work. She was one of the marked personalities of Boston in her day, prominent in reform movements. Naturally averse to personal publicity, she did not shun it where her name and word could add weight to the advocacy of a just cause. In the education and health of the community, she showed the most interest. She was a strenuous champion of the claims of African Americans to political and social justice. She advocated for religious toleration and the enfranchisement of women. She took an interest in social concerns such as the Freedman’s Aid Society (secretary of the committee on aid for colored regiments and of the teachers’ committee, 1863), Massachusetts Woman Suffrage Association (vice president), New England Women’s Club (vice president) and the New England Hospital for Women and Children (secretary, 1862). She lectured at the Concord School of Philosophy on the history of art, and wrote about art in several books and articles. She was an active member of the Margaret Fuller conversation class. She went south to visit the Freedmen’s schools in 1866, 1868, and 1869. Cheney was one of the founders in 1862 of the New England Hospital for Women and Children, its secretary for twenty-seven years and president fifteen years, is numbered among the veterans of the forward movements in education, philanthropy, and reform of the nineteenth century, who happily still live to grace by their presence and help by their wise counsels the deliberative assemblies and budding activities of the twentieth century.

Cheney visited Europe several times, and spoke before lyceums west of New England in 1873, 1875, and 1876. The location where her home stood in Jamaica Plain is a site on the Boston Women’s Heritage Trail.

Her early womanhood was passed under stimulating influences, being a member of one of those famous conversation classes which Margaret Fuller instituted in the decade of 1830-40. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Amos Bronson Alcott, Abby May, James Freeman Clarke, and Theodore Parker were among those who strongly influenced her thought. The dawn of New England Transcendentalism, brought golden opportunities to the young aspirant for intellectual culture. A great awakening and a new sense of the surpassing riches of life was the result to Cheney of attending for three successive seasons the conversations of Margaret Fuller. Few teachers have shown to such a degree the power of personality. Cheney wrote:— “I absorbed her life and her thoughts, and to this day I am astonished to find how large a part of what I am when I am most myself I have derived from her. . . .She did not make us her disciples, her blind followers. She opened the book of life and helped us to read it for ourselves.” It is significant that Cheney and her elder sister, Mary Frances, were among the first parishioners of Theodore Parker when he came from West Roxbury, Massachusetts to Boston, 1846. He would become her inspirer, friend, and comforter in time of sorrow.

For a year or two before her marriage, Cheney was the secretary of the School of Design for Women in Boston, of which she was one of the founders in 1851. Short-lived, the school yet served to show the existence of talent among American women, and is remembered as “one of the failures that enriched the ground for success.”

On May 19, 1853, she married the artist, Seth Wells Cheney. Twin ambitions, art and literature, were native to Cheney. Choosing the latter for her field of occupation, she also cultivated her taste for the former. As an artist’s wife, she made her first visit to Europe, sailing with her husband for Liverpool in August, 1854. The year following their return (in June, 1855) witnessed the birth of a daughter, Margaret Swan, in September, 1855, and the death of Mr. Cheney in April, 1856, in South Manchester, Connecticut, his native place. He was one of the earliest crayon artists in America. Seth Cheney’s crayon portraits were among the delights of his time. The foremost women of Boston were glad to sit for him. Among his portraits of men, was one of Theodore Parker which was highly prized. An exhibition of a number of these works was arranged some years after by Sylvester Rosa Koehler, curator of engravings, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Cheney was one of the subscribers toward the establishment in 1856, under the leadership of Dr. Marie Elizabeth Zakrzewska, of the first women’s hospital, the New England Hospital for Women and Children. A few years later, she was interested with others in the addition of a clinical department to the medical school for women in Boston. In 1863, she was one of the three women corporators of the New England Hospital for Women and Children, which they had started in 1862 in a house on Pleasant Street. “Accepting the position of secretary, Cheney, to quote the words of Dr. Zakrzewska, “devoted herself to the work, and became one of the most powerful advocates and supporters of this institution — an institution now firmly established and professionally recognized, and which by its efficiency and conscientious work has not only educated women as physicians and nurses, but has opened the way for the former to a professional equality with medical men, as the Massachusetts Medical Society was the first to admit women as members.” Succeeding Lucy Goddard as president of the hospital in 1887, Cheney continued in office for fifteen years, until her resignation on account of failing health in October, 1902, at which time she became Honorary President.

From 1863, Cheney made her home in Jamaica Plain. Early interested in the work of the Freedmen’s Aid Society (founded in 1861), she became the secretary of the teachers’ committee on the resignation of Hannah E. Stevenson. In 1865, she went to Readville and taught soldiers, and attended the convention of Freedmen’s societies in New York City. Cheney made several visits to the South in the years directly following the close of the Civil War, the first time going with Abby May as a delegate to a convention in Baltimore. Unexpectedly called upon there to address a meeting composed largely of African Americans, she had her first experience in public speaking. During her absence on one of these Southern trips, a society was formed in Boston in 1867, of which she was appointed a director, and later Honorary President, and in which she continued to work — the Free Religious Association, “the freedom and inspiration of whose first meetings” she finds it “impossible to report.”

In 1868, Cheney was one of the founders of the New England Women’s Club, which soon came to be recognized as a forceful influence for good in the community. About the same time, she identified herself with the woman suffrage movement.

Joining the Association for the Advancement of Women early in the 1870s, a year or two after its organization, she became one of its most valued workers and speakers. In 1869, she assisted in founding a horticultural school for women, of which Abby W. May became president. Cheney lectured on horticulture for women before the Massachusetts State Agricultural Society in 1871.

Cheney’s second visit to Europe in 1877, in company with her sisters and her daughter, was saddened in Rome by the death of her sister, Helen. Returning to Boston in 1878, she responded to an invitation to give a course of lectures on art at the Concord School of Philosophy the following summer, and continued to lecture throughout the session.

In 1879, she delivered a course of ten lectures on the history of art before the Concord School of Philosophy, and the same year was elected vice-president of the Massachusetts School Suffrage Association, later becoming its president.

Her works, all published in Boston, include: Hand-Book for American Citizens (1864); Patience (1870), Social Games (1871), Faithful to the Light (1872), Child of the Tide (1874), Life of Susan Dimoch (1875), Gleanings in Fields of Art (1881), Selected Poems of Michael Angelo (1885), Children’s Friend, a sketch of Louisa M. Alcott (1888), Biography of L. M. Alcott (1889), Nora’s Return (1890), Stories of Olden Time (1890), and a number of articles in books. She contributed to the North American Review, the Christian Examiner, the RadicalIndex, the Woman’s Journal, and other periodicals. She edited the poems of David A. Wasson (Boston, 1887), and of Harriet Winslow Sewall (Boston, 1889). Much of her work was devoted to religious and artistic subjects. She also published three memoirs of family members: Memoir of S. W. Cheney (1881), Memoir of John Cheney, Engraver (1888), and Memoir of Margaret S. Cheney (1888).

In 1882, Cheney’s daughter, Margaret Swan Cheney (September 8, 1855 – September 22, 1882), died of tuberculosis while a student in the 1882 class at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. A room in the Technology building was fitted up and named for her, the Margaret Swan Cheney Reading Room.

In 1887, she was elected president of the hospital she had helped to found. She was a delegate to the Woman’s Council in Washington, D. C. in 1888. In 1890, she attended the Lake Mohawk Negro Conference.

Cheney died at Jamaica Plain, November 19, 1904, and was buried at East Cemetery, Manchester, Connecticut.

Works

  • Patience: a series of thirty games with cards.1870
  • Social games. A collection of 31 games with cards.1871
  • Faithful to the Light and Other Tales.1871
  • Sally Williams, the mountain girl.1872
  • The Child of the Tide / By Ednah D. Cheney.1874
  • Memoir of Susan Dimock : resident physician of the New England Hospital for Women and Children.1875
  • Jenny of the Lighthouse.1877
  • Memoir of Seth W. Cheney, artist.1881
  • Gleanings in the Fields of Art.1881
  • Louisa May Alcott, the Children’s Friend.1888
  • The Life of Louisa May Alcott.1888
  • Memoir of John Cheney, Engraver.1889
  • Nora’s return : a sequel to “The doll’s house” of Henry Ibsen / by Ednah D. Cheney.1890
  • Memoirs of Lucretia Crocker and Abby W. May.1893
  • Life of Christian Daniel Rauch of Berlin, Germany. Drawn from German authorities by Ednah D. Cheney.1893
  • Reminiscences of Ednah Dow Cheney (born Littlehale).1902

There is a light crease coming down from top of card that is hardly visible. G. $275


AA215. Photographie Delphin E. Montastier. Pierre Loti (pseudonym of Louis Marie-Julien Viaud 14 January 1850 – 10 June 1923) was a French naval officer and novelist, known for his exotic novels and short stories. Cabinet Card. Corner chip o/w VG. $25


AA216. Photographic negative by Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony. Nathaniel Hawthorne (July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was an American novelist, dark romantic, and short story writer. His works often focus on history, morality, and religion. He was born in 1804 in Salem, Massachusetts, to Nathaniel Hathorne and the former Elizabeth Clarke Manning. His ancestors include John Hathorne, the only judge involved in the Salem witch trials who never repented of his actions. He entered Bowdoin College in 1821, was elected to Phi Beta Kappa in 1824, and graduated in 1825. He published his first work in 1828, the novel Fanshawe; he later tried to suppress it, feeling that it was not equal to the standard of his later work. He published several short stories in periodicals, which he collected in 1837 as Twice-Told Tales. The next year, he became engaged to Sophia Peabody. He worked at the Boston Custom House and joined Brook Farm, a transcendentalist community, before marrying Peabody in 1842. The couple moved to The Old Manse in Concord, Massachusetts, later moving to Salem, the Berkshires, then to The Wayside in Concord. The Scarlet Letter was published in 1850, followed by a succession of other novels. A political appointment as consul took Hawthorne and family to Europe before their return to Concord in 1860. Hawthorne died on May 19, 1864, and was survived by his wife and their three children. Much of Hawthorne’s writing centers on New England, many works featuring moral metaphors with an anti-Puritan inspiration. His fiction works are considered part of the Romantic movement and, more specifically, dark romanticism. His themes often center on the inherent evil and sin of humanity, and his works often have moral messages and deep psychological complexity. His published works include novels, short stories, and a biography of his college friend Franklin Pierce, the 14th President of the United States. CDV. VG. $250