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AR3. John & Charles Watkins, London. George Cruikshank (1792-1878). Noted English artist and caricaturist. CDV. VG. $95


AR12.
Fradelle & Young, London. John Everett Millais (1829-1896), Pre-Raphaelite English painter with palette. Cabinet Card. VG. $200

  
AR22.
Pierson, Paris. Adolphe Yvon (1817-1893). Prolific French artist of historical, religious, military, genre, and portraits. Trained under Paul Delaroche at the Ecole des Beauz-Arts in Paris. Made his salon debut in 1841, won a succession of medals, became a member and an officer of the Legion of Honor. In 1861 he painted a portrait of Prince Imperial, in 1868 he painted the emperor. CDV. VG. $75


AR24.
Ch. Reutlinger, Paris. Hippolyte Flandrin (1809-1864). French Neoclassical painter. Trimmed at bottom. CDV. G. $30

  
AR26.
Etienne Carjat & Co., Paris. Florent Willems (1823-1905). Portrait and genre artist, born in Belgium. CDV. VG. $50


AR47.
No ID. George Cruikshank (1792-1878). English caricaturist and illustrator. Trimmed. CDV. G. $30

     
AR54.
Photographic Negative from Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E. Anthony, NY. Felix Octavious Carr Darley (1822-1888). American illustrator. CDV. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $125

     
AR56.
Photographic Negative from Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E. Anthony, NY. Frederick Evan Church (1826-1900). American landscape painter, Hudson River school. CDV. Trimmed at bottom. VG. $250


AR62.
F. Mulnier, Paris. Gustave Dore (January 6, 1832 – January 23, 1883), French artist, engraver, illustrator, and sculptor. CDV. VG. $125


AR63.
Nadar, Paris. Gustave Dore (January 6, 1832 – January 23, 1883), French artist, engraver, illustrator, and sculptor. CDV. VG. $125


AR64.
No ID. Gustave Dore (January 6, 1832 – January 23, 1883), French artist, engraver, illustrator, and sculptor. CDV. VG. $85


AR67.
Ch. Reutlinger, Paris. Gustave Dore (January 6, 1832 – January 23, 1883), French artist, engraver, illustrator, and sculptor. CDV. VG. $75


AR68.
Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony. Erastus D. Palmer (1817-1904). Renowned sculptor. His best know work is probably “The White Captive.” CDV. G. $200


AR72.
Brady’s National Portrait Gallery, published by E&HT Anthony. William Page (January 3, 1811 – October 1, 1885), American painter and portrait artist. CDV. G. $150


AR78. C.D. Fredricks & Co., NY. George Cruikshank (27 September 1792 – 1 February 1878) was a British caricaturist and book illustrator, praised as the “modern Hogarth” during his life. His book illustrations for his friend Charles Dickens, and many other authors, reached an international audience. Trimmed at bottom. CDV. VG. $95


AR79. The London Stereoscopic and Photographic Company. Sir John Everett Millais (8 June 1829 – 13 August 1896) was an English painter and illustrator who was one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. He was a child prodigy who, aged eleven, became the youngest student to enter the Royal Academy Schools. The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was founded at his family home in London, at 83 Gower Street (now number 7). Millais became the most famous exponent of the style, his painting Christ in the House of His Parents (1850) generating considerable controversy, and painting perhaps the embodiment of the school, Ophelia, in 1850-51. By the mid-1850s Millais was moving away from the Pre-Raphaelite style to develop a new form of realism in his art. His later works were enormously successful, making Millais one of the wealthiest artists of his day, but some former admirers including William Morris saw this as a sell-out (Millais notoriously allowed one of his paintings to be used for a sentimental soap advertisement). CDV. VG. $100


AR80. Charles D. Fredricks & Co., NY. Felix Octavius Carr “F. O. C.” Darley (June 23, 1822 – March 27, 1888) was an American painter in watercolor and illustrator, known for his illustrations in works by well-known 19th-century authors, including James Fenimore Cooper, Charles Dickens, Mary Mapes Dodge, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Washington Irving, George Lippard, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Donald Grant Mitchell, Clement Clarke Moore, Frances Parkman, Harriet Beecher Stowe and Nathaniel Parker Willis. CDV. VG. $125


AR84. Pierre Petit, Paris. Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot (July 16, 1796– February 22, 1875) was a French landscape and portrait painter as well as a printmaker in etching. He is a pivotal figure in landscape painting and his vast output simultaneously references the Neo-Classical tradition and anticipates the plein-air innovations of Impressionism. CDV. VG. $150


AR87. Bingham, Paris. Jean-Louis Ernest Meissonier (21 February 1815 – 31 January 1891) was a French Classicist painter and sculptor famous for his depictions of Napoleon, his armies and military themes. He documented sieges and manoeuvres and was the teacher of Édouard Detaille. Meissonier enjoyed great success in his lifetime, and was acclaimed both for his mastery of fine detail and assiduous craftsmanship. The English art critic John Ruskin examined his work at length under a magnifying glass, “marvelling at Meissonier’s manual dexterity and eye for fascinating minutiae”. Meissonier’s work commanded enormous prices and in 1846 he purchased a great mansion in Poissy, sometimes known as the Grande Maison. The Grande Maison included two large studios, the atelier d’hiver, or winter workshop, situated on the top floor of the house, and at ground level, a glass-roofed annexe, the atelier d’été or summer workshop. Meissonier himself said that his house and temperament belonged to another age, and some, like the critic Paul Mantz for example, criticised the artist’s seemingly limited repertoire. Like Alexandre Dumas, he excelled at depicting scenes of chivalry and masculine adventure against a backdrop of pre-Revolutionary and pre-industrial France, specialising in scenes from seventeenth and eighteenth-century life. CDV. VG. $150


AR88. Maull & Polyblank, London. William Powell Frith (19 January 1819 – 9 November 1909) was an English painter specialising in genre subjects and panoramic narrative works of life in the Victorian era. He was elected to the Royal Academy in 1853, presenting The Sleeping Model as his Diploma work. He has been described as the “greatest British painter of the social scene since Hogarth”. CDV. VG. $125


AR90. Disderi, Paris. Rosa Bonheur, born Marie-Rosalie Bonheur, (16 March 1822 – 25 May 1899) was a French artist, an animalière (painter of animals) and sculptor, known for her artistic realism. Her most well-known paintings are Ploughing in the Nivernais, first exhibited at the Paris Salon of 1848, and now at Musée d’Orsay in Paris, and The Horse Fair (in French: Le marché aux chevaux), which was exhibited at the Salon of 1853 (finished in 1855) and is now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, in New York City. Bonheur was widely considered to be the most famous female painter during the nineteenth century. CDV. VG. $125


AR93. Bingham, Paris. Jean-Léon Gérôme (11 May 1824 – 10 January 1904) was a French painter and sculptor in the style now known as academicism. The range of his oeuvre included historical painting, Greek mythology, Orientalism, portraits, and other subjects, bringing the academic painting tradition to an artistic climax. He is considered one of the most important painters from this academic period. He was also a teacher with a long list of students. CDV. VG. $125


AR96. Maull & Polyblank, London. Thomas Faed (8 June 1826 – 17 August 1900) was a Scottish painter who is said to have done for Scottish art what Robert Burns did for Scottish song. Faed was  born in Gatehouse of Fleet, Kirkcudbrightshire, and was the brother of John Faed, also a Scottish painter. He received his art education in the school of design, Edinburgh and was elected an associate of the Royal Scottish Academy in 1849. He went to London three years later, was elected an associate of the Royal Academy in 1861, and academician in 1864, and retired in 1893. He had much success as a painter of domestic genre. Three of his pictures, The Silken GownFaults on Both Sides, and The Highland Mother are in the Tate Gallery and a further two, Highland Mary and The Reaper hang in the Aberdeen Art Gallery. The Last of the Clan, completed in 1865 and arguably his best known work, is in the Kelvingrove Gallery in Glasgow. He produced several versions of this work, including a smaller version now in The Fleming Collection. Two other celebrated pictures are The Motherless Bairn and Scott and His Literary Friends at Abbotsford. CDV. G. $85 

 
AR97. Sarony, NY. Thomas Nast (September 27, 1840 – December 7, 1902) was a German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist considered to be the “Father of the American Cartoon.” He was the scourge of Democratic Representative “Boss” Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine. Among his notable works were the creation of the modern version of Santa Claus (based on the traditional German figures of Sankt Nikolaus and Weihnachtsmann) and the political symbol of the elephant for the Republican Party (GOP). Contrary to popular belief, Nast did not create Uncle Sam (the male personification of the United States Federal Government), Columbia (the female personification of American values), or the Democratic donkey, though he did popularize these symbols through his artwork. Nast was associated with the magazine Harper’s Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and from 1862 until 1886. Albert Boime argues that: “As a political cartoonist, Thomas Nast wielded more influence than any other artist of the 19th century. He not only enthralled a vast audience with boldness and wit, but swayed it time and again to his personal position on the strength of his visual imagination. Both Lincoln and Grant acknowledged his effectiveness in their behalf, and as a crusading civil reformer he helped destroy the corrupt Tweed Ring that swindled New York City of millions of dollars. Indeed, his impact on American public life was formidable enough to profoundly affect the outcome of every presidential election during the period 1864 to 1884.” CDV plus a 2.25″ x 3.5″ card with Nast’s autograph “Th: Nast. April-9-1884.” VG. $275


AR98. [Sarony, NY.]  Thomas Nast (September 27, 1840 – December 7, 1902) was a German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist considered to be the “Father of the American Cartoon”. He was the scourge of Democratic Representative “Boss” Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine. Among his notable works were the creation of the modern version of Santa Claus (based on the traditional German figures of Sankt Nikolaus and Weihnachtsmann) and the political symbol of the elephant for the Republican Party (GOP). Contrary to popular belief, Nast did not create Uncle Sam (the male personification of the United States Federal Government), Columbia (the female personification of American values), or the Democratic donkey, though he did popularize these symbols through his artwork. Nast was associated with the magazine Harper’s Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and from 1862 until 1886. Albert Boime argues that: “As a political cartoonist, Thomas Nast wielded more influence than any other artist of the 19th century. He not only enthralled a vast audience with boldness and wit, but swayed it time and again to his personal position on the strength of his visual imagination. Both Lincoln and Grant acknowledged his effectiveness in their behalf, and as a crusading civil reformer he helped destroy the corrupt Tweed Ring that swindled New York City of millions of dollars. Indeed, his impact on American public life was formidable enough to profoundly affect the outcome of every presidential election during the period 1864 to 1884.” CDV. VG. $150


AR99. Allen & Horton, Boston. Rembrandt Peale (February 22, 1778 – October 3, 1860) was an American artist and museum keeper. A prolific portrait painter, he was especially acclaimed for his likenesses of presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. Peale’s style was influenced by French Neoclassicism after a stay in Paris in his early thirties. CDV. G. $95


AR100. No ID. Felix Octavius Carr “F. O. C.” Darley (June 23, 1822 – March 27, 1888) was an American painter in watercolor and illustrator, known for his illustrations in works by well-known 19th-century authors, including James Fenimore Cooper, Charles Dickens, Mary Mapes Dodge, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Washington Irving, George Lippard, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Donald Grant Mitchell, Clement Clarke Moore, Frances Parkman, Harriet Beecher Stowe and Nathaniel Parker Willis. CDV. G. $65


AR101. Bingham, Paris. Ludwig Knaus (5 October 1829 – 7 December 1910) was a German genre painter. He was born at Wiesbaden and studied from 1845 to 1852 under Sohn and Schadow in Düsseldorf. His early works, like The Gamblers in the Düsseldorf Gallery, are in the manner of that school, being dark and heavy in color. This deficiency was remedied by study at Paris, whither he went in 1852 and enrolled as a pupil of Thomas Couture. In 1853 his Morning after the Kermess received the second gold Medal of the Salon and made him a celebrated painter. Except for a year’s study in Italy he remained in Paris until 1860. His chief works of this period include The Golden WeddingThe Baptism, and The Promenade, purchased for the Luxembourg. From 1861 to 1866 he practiced at Berlin, producing such works as Boys Playing CardsLooking for a Bride (Wiesbaden Museum), and His Highness on His Travels. The next eight years of his life saw the production of much of his best work, including The Children’s Festival(Nation Gallery, Berlin), In Great Distress, and The Village Prince. From 1874 to 1883 he was professor at the Royal Prussian Academy, Berlin, continuing to reside in that city until his death. Among the most important works of his last period were: The Holy Family and The Road to Ruin, both painted in 1876 and now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Behind the Curtain (1880), Dresden Gallery; The Rag Baby (1880) and A Village Festival (1881), both in the Vanderbilt collection, Metropolitan Museum, New York; and A Duel. During his last period Knaus also painted a series of “Idyls,” with nudes in a rather classical style, of which an important example is in the Wiesbaden Museum. The most famous examples of his portraits, which are genre in character, are those of the scientist Helmholtz and the historian Mommsen, both in the National Gallery, Berlin. Among his many distinctions were the great gold medal of the Berlin Exhibition of 1861 and the grand medal of honor at the Paris Exposition of 1867. Many of his works are represented at the Museum Wiesbaden. He was a member of the Berlin, Munich, and many other academies; an Officer of the Legion of Honor and a Knight of the Prussian Order Pour le Mérite. Possibly, his most famous work is Girl in a Field (1857). Engravings of his works were especially popular among the German peasantry. CDV. VG. $100


AR102. Disderi, Paris. Disderi, Paris. Rosa Bonheur, born Marie-Rosalie Bonheur, (16 March 1822 – 25 May 1899) was a French artist, an animalière (painter of animals) and sculptor, known for her artistic realism. Her most well-known paintings are Ploughing in the Nivernais, first exhibited at the Paris Salon of 1848, and now at Musée d’Orsay in Paris, and The Horse Fair (in French: Le marché aux chevaux), which was exhibited at the Salon of 1853 (finished in 1855) and is now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, in New York City. Bonheur was widely considered to be the most famous female painter during the nineteenth century. CDV. VG. $125


AR103. Pierre Petit, Paris. Thomas Couture (21 December 1815 – 30 March 1879) was a French history painter and teacher. He taught such later luminaries of the art world as Édouard Manet, Henri Fantin-Latour, John La Farge, Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, Karel Javůrek, and J-N Sylvestre. CDV. VG. $95


AR104. Carjat & Cie, Paris. Jules Adolphe Aimé Louis Breton (1 May 1827 – 5 July 1906) was a 19th-century French Realist painter. His paintings are heavily influenced by the French countryside and his absorption of traditional methods of painting helped make Jules Breton one of the primary transmitters of the beauty and idyllic vision of rural existence. CDV. VG. $95


AR105. Disderi & Cie, Paris. Émile Jean-Horace Vernet (30 June 1789 – 17 January 1863) was a French painter of battles, portraits, and Orientalist subjects. CDV. VG. $95


AR106. Bingham, Paris. Alexandre Cabanel (28 September 1823 – 23 January 1889) was a French painter. He painted historical, classical and religious subjects in the academic style. He was also well known as a portrait painter. According to Diccionario Enciclopedico Salvat, Cabanel is the best representative of the L’art pompier and Napoleon III’s preferred painter. CDV. VG. $100


AR108. Carjat & Cie, Paris. Charles Amédée de Noé, known as Cham (January 26, 1818 – September 6, 1879), was a French caricaturist and lithographer. Raised by a family who wished him to attend a polytechnic school, he instead attended painting workshops by Nicolas Charlet and Paul Delaroche and began work as a cartoonist, taking on the pseudonym “Cham.” In 1839 he published his first book, Monsieur Lajaunisse, which began a career that would span 40,000 drawings. In 1843 he began to be published in newspapers like Le Charivari, whose staff he was on for thirty years. Later works included Proudhon en voyage and Histoire comique de l’Assemblée nationale. He wrote a number of comic plays towards the end of his life. CDV. VG. $100


AR110. Elliott & Fry, London. Myles Birket Foster (4 February 1825 – 27 March 1899) was a popular English illustrator, watercolour artist and engraver in the Victorian period. CDV. VG. $85

 

AR115. Brady’s National Photographic Portrait Galleries, NY and Washington, DC. William John Hennessy (July 11, 1839 – December 27, 1917) was an Irish artist. Hennessy was born in Thomastown, County Kilkenny in 1839. His father, John Hennessy, was forced to leave Ireland in 1848 as a result of his involvement in the Young Ireland movement. He landed in Canada and settled in New York City. William, his mother Catherine, and brother joined their father there in 1849. He gained admittance to the National Academy of Design in 1854 and exhibited his first works there. Hennessy developed a skill in wood engraving and was hired to illustrate the works of renowned poets, including that of Tennyson, Longfellow and Whittier. As an American he became the co-founder of the Artists’ Fund Society, and an honorary member of the American Society of Painters in Watercolours. In 1870 he moved to London where he became a member of the Royal Institute of Oil Painters in 1902. Between 1879 and 1907 the Royal Hibernian Academy displayed eight of his paintings. He married in Charlotte Mather (1842-1940) from New Haven, Conn., descendant of the old and illustrious Mather family of Early New England Puritan divines and had by her four children. Trimmed at bottom. CDV. VG. $100


AR117. Brady’s National Photographic Portrait Galleries, NY and Washington, DC. William Jacob Hays (born Aug. 8, 1830 – March 13, 1875) was an American painter who spent most of his life in NYC. Hays, known chiefly as a painter of animal life, owes his reputation as an artist to material gathered on a trip up the Missouri river in the summer of 1860. His work is but little known at present, but in his prime (1855-1875) he received considerable recognition both at home and abroad.  A London paper in 1865 commenting on one of Hays’ pictures then on display in London, said, “English artists must look to their laurels, or America will rob them of some of them in landscape and animal painting in which they have hitherto held their ground almost undisputed.” The Art Journal in 1875 called Hays “one of the most able painters in the country.” S. G. W. Benjamin in his review of American art stated that “William Hayes [sic] showed decided ability in his representations of bisons, prairie dogs, and other dogs. Weak in color, he yet succeeded in giving spirit and character to the group he painted, and holds among our animal painters a position not dissimilar to that of Mount in genre.” VG. $125


AR119. Brady’s National Photographic Portrait Galleries, NY and Washington, DC. Daniel Huntington (October 4, 1816 – April 19, 1906), American artist, was born in New York City, the son of Benjamin Huntington, Jr. and Faith Trumbull Huntington; his paternal grandfather was Benjamin Huntington, delegate at the Second Continental Congress and first U.S. Representative from Connecticut. His maternal grandfather was Jedediah Huntington (4 August 1743 – 25 September 1818) of Norwich, Connecticut, who served as a General in the American Revolutionary War. He studied at Yale with Samuel F.B. Morse, and later with Henry Inman. From 1833 to 1835 he transferred to Hamilton College in Clinton, New York, where he met Charles Loring Elliott, who encouraged him to become an artist. He first exhibited his work at the National Academy of Design in 1836. Subsequently, he painted some landscapes in the tradition of the Hudson River School. Huntington made several trips to Europe, the first in 1839 traveling to England, Rome, Florence and Paris with his friend and pupil Henry Peters Gray. On his return to America in 1840, he painted his allegorical painting “Mercy’s Dream”, which brought him fame and confirmed his interest in inspirational subjects. He also painted portraits and began the illustration of The Pilgrim’s Progress. In 1844, he went back to Rome. Returning to New York around 1846, he devoted his time chiefly to portrait-painting, although he painted many genre, religious and historical subjects. From 1851 to 1859 he was in England. He was president of the National Academy of Design from 1862 to 1870, and again in 1877-1890. He was also vice president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Trimmed at bottom. CDV. VG. $125


AR121. The London Stereoscopic and Photographic Company, London. William Holman Hunt (2 April 1827 – 7 September 1910) was an English painter and one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. His paintings were notable for their great attention to detail, vivid color, and elaborate symbolism. These features were influenced by the writings of John Ruskin and Thomas Carlyle, according to whom the world itself should be read as a system of visual signs. For Hunt it was the duty of the artist to reveal the correspondence between sign and fact. Of all the members of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, Hunt remained most true to their ideals throughout his career. He was always keen to maximize the popular appeal and public visibility of his works. CDV. G. $85


AR122. Elliott & Fry, London. Richard Ansdell (11 May 1815 – 20 April 1885) was an English oil painter of animals and genre scenes. CDV. VG. $95


AR124. John & Charles Watkins, London.  Sir John Everett Millais (8 June 1829 – 13 August 1896) was an English painter and illustrator who was one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. He was a child prodigy who, aged eleven, became the youngest student to enter the Royal Academy Schools. The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was founded at his family home in London, at 83 Gower Street (now number 7). Millais became the most famous exponent of the style, his painting Christ in the House of His Parents (1850) generating considerable controversy, and painting perhaps the embodiment of the school, Ophelia, in 1850-51. By the mid-1850s Millais was moving away from the Pre-Raphaelite style to develop a new form of realism in his art. His later works were enormously successful, making Millais one of the wealthiest artists of his day, but some former admirers including William Morris saw this as a sell-out (Millais notoriously allowed one of his paintings to be used for a sentimental soap advertisement). CDV. G. $100


AR125. No ID. George Edward Perine (July 9, 1837 – February 3, 1885) was a noted artist, engraver, and publisher. In 1852, he began engraving for Thomas Doney in New York and in 1856-1858 for W.W. Rice, a line and bank-note engraver. He engraved in mezzotint a large plate, entitled “The Signing of the Compact in the Cabin of the Mayflower,” before he was nineteen years old. He was employed by New York engravers in 1858-1860 and in 1860 began engraving on his own and soon established a successful business in New York City. He mainly did portrait engraving and though he had many engravers in his employ, it is said that he finished every plate himself. Among his best known productions were the engravings entitled “The Better Land”, dedicated to the poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, published in 1866; “The Good Part,” published a few years later; and a series of portraits on steel of distinguished men which appeared in The Eclectic Magazine. Of the books published by him, the most noteworthy were: “History of the Fifty-First Congress” (illustrated), and “A History of New York City,” by Benson John Lossing, LL.D., the historian. George Edward Perine was born July 9, 1837, at South Orange, New Jersey, a son of Joseph and Sarah Decker Perine, and a descendant of Daniel Perrin, “The Huguenot.” He married Augusta Moore on June 15, 1859 and had eight children. He died February 3, 1885, at Brooklyn, New York. This carte is inscribed and signed by Perine on verso. Rounded corner. CDV. VG. $125

 
AR137. Rockwood, NY. William Page(January 3, 1811 – October 1, 1885), American painter and portrait artist. CDV. G. $125


AR140. No ID. Charles Loring Elliott (1812–1868) was an American painter known for his portraits. He was active in central New York for 10 years as a young man, then in 1845 moved to New York City to pursue his career. He was elected to the National Academy of Design in 1846. G. $100