Be sure to see the Civil War images in CDV and Cabinet Card, Tintype, and Large Albumen Image formats!

cw97.JPG (31291 bytes)
CW97.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 3581. Trout House and Masonic Hall, Marrietta St., Atlanta, Ga. Wood shacks, barracks in foreground. 3-cent revenue stamp on verso. Few spots. VG-. $235

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CW139.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 3162. Residence of Jeff. Davis, Richmond, Va. VG. $135

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CW145.
E&HT Anthony. Negative by Brady & Co. War Views. No. 2328. Bull Run Battlefield, Va. VG. $250

cw157.JPG (65164 bytes)
CW157.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 2513. Gen. Grant’s Rail Road, City Point, Va. looking South. VG. $450

cw159.JPG (44735 bytes)
CW159.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 2695. Exchanged Rebel Prisoners going to Coxe’s Landing, under guard. Nicely tinted. VG. $350

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CW199.
E&HT Anthony. Prominent Portraits. No. 2275 (crossed out and 2929 pencilled in). Maj. Gen. N.P. Banks. Small scrape on left image and several spots. VG. $350

cw209.JPG (22557 bytes)
CW209.
Taylor & Huntington. 2529. Embalming Building near Fredericksburg, Va. VG. $350

cw219.JPG (25296 bytes)
CW219.
E&HT Anthony. Prominent Portraits. No. 2930. Maj. Gen. John C. Fremont. G. $300

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CW229.
No ID. Pencilled titled on verso “Shermans men wheeling ammunition from Fort McAllister near Savannah, Ga.” Rare view. VG. $550

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CW236.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 2654. Knoxville R.R. Depot at Chattanooga. Group of Rebel prisoners waiting transportation North. VG. $650  [close-up]

cw240.JPG (34140 bytes)
CW240.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 2715. Ruins of Railroad Depot, Atlanta, Ga. VG. $450

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CW243.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 3643. Rebel Fortifications, Atlanta, Ga. Tinted. VG. $425

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CW268.
Negative by Brady & Co. Published by E&HT Anthony. The War for the Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 2500. Signal Tower, Cobb’s Hill, Appomattox River, Va. Brady’s portable darkroom wagon is on the right, a large lens and lens board are on the ground at center. Few spots in sky areas. G+. $400

cw271.JPG (36095 bytes)
CW271.
Negative by Brady & Co. Published by E&HT Anthony. The War for the Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 2508. Burial of dead at Fredericksburgh, Va. G+. $225


CW294.
E&HT Anthony. The War for the Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 3140. Interior of Fort Sumpter, Charleston Harbor, S.C., April 14th, 1865. Henry Ward Beecher delivering the Oration on the occasion of the raising of the old Flag. VG. $200

cw298.JPG (43953 bytes)
CW298.
E&HT Anthony. The War for the Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 3178. A Dead Southern Soldier, as he lay on the foot passage in the Trenches of Fort Mahone, called by the Soldiers “Fort Damnation.” Part of a broken Musket and Bayonet stuck in the bank. The marks and spots on his face are blood issuing from the wound in his head. This view was taken the morning after the storming of Petersburgh, Va., April 2d, 1865. VG. $325

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CW302.
E&HT Anthony. The War for the Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 3190. A Dead Southern Soldier, as he lay in the Trenches of Fort Mahone, called by the Soldiers “Fort Damnation.” This Soldier must have been killed by a fragment of Shell, that exploded close by, as he is covered all over with mud and blood. View taken the morning after the storming of Petersburgh, Va., April 2d, 1865. VG. $300

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CW357.
Negative by Brady & Co. E&HT Anthony. The War for the Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 2299. Slave Pen, Alexandria, Va. VG. $350

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CW364.
Negative by Brady & Co. Published by E&HT Anthony. The War For the Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 2506. Burial of dead at Fredericksburgh, Va. G+. $250

cw387.JPG (32617 bytes)
CW387.
Taylor & Huntington. Original is by Gardner, photographed by Timothy O’Sullivan. The War For the Union. 157. Building a Pontoon Bridge at Beaufort, S.C. This is a view of the troops engaged in building a pontoon bridge across Port Royal River, at Beaufort, S.C., in March 1862. Each boat, with a certain number of timbers, is carried on a large wagon, and when needed, is brought up to the water’s edge, slipped off from the wheels into the river, anchored parallel with the current, and followed by others in a like manner; the timbers are soon laid, and the army has a serviceable bridge, light and strong. VG. $225


CW413.
Negative by J. Gardner from Alexander Gardner’s Gallery. E&HT Anthony, Wholesale Agents. Photographic Incidents of the War. No. 707. Quartermaster’s Department, Belle Plain, May 17, 1864. G. $400


CW425.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 3139. Interior of Fort Sumpter, Charleston Harbor, S.C., April 14th, 1865, pending the ceremony of raising the old flag. VG. $250


CW426.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 3486. North-east angle of Ft. Marshall, Sullivan Island, Charleston Harbor, S.C. VG. $200

  
CW431.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 3536. Interior View of Ft. McAllister, Savannah, Ga. Incorrect printed label has been corrected in pencil. G+. $150


CW436.
E.S. Lumpkin & Co., Richmond, Va. No. 1. Jeff Davis Mansion. VG. $125


CW437.
John C. Taylor. The War For the Union Photographic History. No. 3202. The Union picket line before Petersburg. VG. $150


CW440.
E&HT Anthony. The War For The Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 2727. Libby Prison, Richmond, Va. This photo is by AJ Russell. VG. $125


CW442.
E&HT Anthony. The War For The Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 3325. Grand Review of the Great Veteran Armies of Grant and Sherman at Washington, on the 23d and 24th May, 1865. Sherman’s Grand Army. Looking up Pennsylvania Ave. form the Treasury Buildings, Maj. Gen. Frank Blair and Staff and 15th Army Corps passing in Review. G. $250


CW443.
E&HT Anthony. The War For The Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 3320. Grand Review of the Great Veteran Armies of Grant and Sherman at Washington, on the 23d and 24th May, 1865. Sherman’s Grand Army. Looking up Pennsylvania Ave., from the Treasury Buildings, Maj. Gen. Logan and Staff and Army of Tennessee passing in Review. VG. $300


CW454.
John C. Taylor. The War for the Union Photographic History. No. 3176. A dead Confederate soldier on the Petersburg line, April 2, 1865. A rifle ball has passed through his head near the left eye. VG. $350


CW456.
Negative by Brady & Co. E&HT Anthony. The War For The Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 3368. 1st African Church, Richmond, Va. Stain on right image. G. $350


CW457.
E&HT Anthony. The War For The Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 3172. View on the Lynchburgh Canal, near the Haxall Flour Mills, Richmond, Va. The ruins of the Gallego Mills in the distance. 2-cent orange tax stamp on verso. VG. $325


CW466.
E&HT Anthony. Prominent Portraits. No. 3905. Maj. Gen. Wm. B. Hazen. VG. $650


CW475.
Published by E&HT Anthony. The War For The Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 2539. James River Pontoon Bridge, opened for the passage of Steamers. VG. $150


CW482.
Taylor & Huntington. The War for the Union. Number is negative is 2653. Chattanooga, Railroad Depot, Lookout Mountain in the distance. VG. $275


CW491.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War For The Union. War Views. No. 3039. Dwelling Houses in Petersburgh, Va., showing the effect of Gen. Grant’s Bombardment. VG. $150


CW492.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War For The Union. War Views. No. 3231. View in the rear of Dunlop’s House, Bollingbrook Street, Petersburgh, showing ruins of Tobacco Warehouses destroyed by shell. VG. $165


CW493.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War For The Union. War Views.    No. 3033. Effects of Shot and Shell on the north side of Petersburgh, Va. Bollingbrook St. View of Dunlop House. VG. $150


CW494.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War For The Union. War Views. No. 3106. View in the Cemetery in the rear of the Circular Church, showing the effects of Shot and Shell among the monuments, Charleston, S.C. VG. $165


CW496.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War For The Union. War Views. No. 3086. View in Central church-yard, showing the effect of shot among the Monuments, Charleston, S.C. VG. $175


CW503.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War For The Union. War Views. No. 2548. Gen. Butler’s Dutch Gap Canal. In the centre is a dam to deep out the water, and passage way for workmen; on the left is a R.R. track for drawing out the dirt; in the foreground a mud scow. VG. $200


CW508.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War For The Union. War Views. No. 2537. Pontoon on James River, above Jones’ landing, north side, 68 Boats, Sutlers’ Schooners in the distance. VG. $175


CW511.
E&HT Anthony. Negative by Brady & Co. Photographic History The War For The Union. War Views. No. 2302. St. Peters Church, near White House, Va., where Gen. Washington was married. VG. $200


CW513.
E&HT Anthony. Negative by Brady & Co. Photographic History The War For The Union. War Views. No. 2336. Gen. Cornwallis’ Head Quarters, in the time of the Revolution, on the right, now used as Hospital under the care of Miss Dix. VG. $150


CW521.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War For The Union. War Views. No. 2649. Monument on the Battlefield of Stone River. Erected by Gen. Hogan’s Brigade to the memory of the veterans of Shiloh. VG. $125


CW525.
E&HT Anthony. Negative by Brady & Co. Photographic History The War For The Union. War Views. No. 3383. Henry Clay’s Monument, Richmond, Va. VG. $125


CW526.
E&HT Anthony. Negative by Brady & Co. Photographic History The War For The Union. War Views. No. 3379. Tomb of Ex-President James Monroe, Richmond, Va. VG. $125


CW529.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War For The Union. War Views. No. 3095. The Parrot Rifled Cannon that threw the shot and shell into Charleston, S.C., from Morris Island. VG. $250


CW530.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War For The Union. War Views. No. 3076. Ruins of the Catholic Cathedral, Charleston, S.C. Rear View. VG. $225


CW531.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War For The Union. War Views. No. 3072. View on Meeting St. Charleston, S.C. looking south, showing St. Michael’s church, the Mills House, ruins of Central Church and Theatre in ruins in the foreground. VG. $250


CW533.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War For The Union. War Views. No. 2646. Panoramic view of Johnsonville, looking down the Tenn. River. The 1st Tenn. Col. Battery in the foreground. VG. $275


CW535.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War For The Union. War Views. No. 3248. View from the Lynchburgh Canal, showing Canal locks, and Haxall Flour Mills, Richmond, Va. VG. $275


CW539.
E&HT Anthony. Negative by Brady & Co. Photographic History The War For The Union. No. 2473. Double Turretted Monitor Onondaga, on the James River. VG. $300


CW541.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War For The Union. No.  2543. Celebrated Aikens Landing, where all the Rebel Prisoners are exchanged, on the James River near Dutch Gap; the double turreted Monitor Omdagua at anchor in the river. G. $325


CW544.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War For The Union. No. 3205. Dismantling of the Rebel Forts after the storming of Petersburgh, Va. Wear to corners, dirt marks. G. $150

  
CW563. E&HT Anthony. Rare Glass Civil War Stereoview. War Views. No. 3124. Interior View of Fort Moultrie, Charleston Harbor, Looking to the Sallyport. VG. $350

     
CW617.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 3274. Pontoon Bridge on the James River, Richmond, Va. VG. $125

                       
CW626.
40 RARE CIVIL WAR IMAGES BY CARBUTT on CD. This CD presents a group of 40 full-size Stereoviews in jpg format. It also includes an enlargement of one side of each view as well as one duplicate of one of the views that has a caption. So there are 40 full size stereo images and 41 enlargements of one side of the image. The 40 rare images on this CD are from Col. John C. Bigelow’s Civil War Stereoview Collection. The images are by John Carbutt of Chicago. Most of the views have tax stamps on versos, cancelled by Carbutt. All of the views show the 134th Ill. Volunteer Infantry at Columbus, Kentucky in 1864. Colonel John C. Bigelow was Lieutenant Colonel commanding the 134th Illinois Infantry. He was also a Captain in the Zouaves earlier in the Civil War. The 134th was organized at Camp Fry, Ill., and mustered in for 100 days May 31, 1864. Moved to Columbus, Ky., June 6-8. Attached to District of Columbus, Ky. and Garrison duty at Columbus till October. Mustered out October 5, 1864. Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 20 Enlisted men by disease. $20

  
CW628.
E&HT Anthony. Prominent Portraits. No. 3880. Maj. Gen. Phillip H. Sheridan, U.S.A. Philip Henry Sheridan (1831-1888). One of the most famous of Civil War Generals. Graduated from West Point in 1853, after having been suspended for one year due to a quarrel with fellow-cadet William R. Terrill. He ranked in the bottom third of his class. Served on the frontier for 8 years and advanced in rank from the grade of second lieutenant, 4th Infantry only after the defection of his superiors to the Confederate cause in 1861. He became chief quartermaster and commissary of the Army of Southwest Missouri; next he served as General Henry W. Halleck’s headquarters quartermaster during the advance on Corinth subsequent to Shiloh. On May 25, 1862, he was appointed colonel of the 2nd Michigan Cavalry and from then on his rise was meteoric. He was made a brigadier general of volunteers on Sept. 13, 1862; fought at Perryville and Murfreesboro; promoted to major general March 16, 1863. At Chickamauga Sheridan commanded the 3rd Div. of Alexander Mcd. McCook’s XX Corps, losing 1500 of 4000 men. Of course the best is yet to come and I direct the interested reader to pages 438-439 of Generals in Blue by Ezra J. Warner.  (KR) VG. $650

     
CW650.
Negative by T.H. O’Sullivan, Gardner Gallery. Published by E&HT Anthony. Photographic Incidents of the War. No. 281. Gen’l Prince and Staff, October, 1863. General Henry Prince of the 2nd Division, 3rd Corps, and Staff – Culpeper, VA.  Seated, left to right: Captain B.W. Hoxie (70th N.Y. Infantry), Lt. E.A. Belger (70th N.Y. Infantry), Lt. W.J. Rusling (5th N.J. Infantry), General Prince, Major Charles Hamlin, A.A.G., Captain G.S. Russell (5th N.J. Infantry). Standing: Captain J. W. Holmes (72 N.Y. Infantry), Captain T. P. Johnson, A.Q.M., unknown, Assistant Surgeon J.F. Calhoun, Lt. Albert Ordway (24th Massachusetts Infantry), unknown, unknown. Henry Prince (6/19/1811-8/19/1892), born in Eastport ME; graduated West Point 1835; fought in Seminole War; Mexican War; frontier duty. Appointed Brig. Gen. of Volunteers April 1862, commanded 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, II Corps at Cedar Mountain; captured; released Dec. 1862; commanded 5th Div., XVIII Corps at New Berne and Kingston. Committee suicide in London. VG. $650

     
CW657.
Negative by Brady & Co. Published by E&HT Anthony. Photographic History. The War for the Union. War Views. No. 2477. Distant View of Belle Plain Landing, James River, Va. U.S. Mail, 2nd Corps wagon at left. VG. $150

     
CW664.
Negative by Brady & Co. Published by E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 2491. Evacuation of Port Royal, Va. May 30th 1864. VG. $250

  
CW678.
E&HT Anthony, although unlabeled. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 3678. View of Fort McAllister, Ga. looking up the Ogechee River. Fort McAllister on the great Ogeechee River was taken soon after the end of Sherman’s March. This view is astounding for its lighting, composition, and the clouds in the sky. There is a tear line in the bottom left of the right image. G. $350

     
CW686.
E. Anthony. No. 818. Col. Corcoran and Staff of the gallant 69th. VG. $750

     
CW690.
E&HT Anthony. Prominent Portraits. No. 2967. Maj. Gen’l W.T. Sherman, U.S.A. Tinted. G+. $450

     
CW704.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 1502. Camp Life, Army of the Potomac-Stirring the Pot. Paper adhesions bottom left margin and top left margin of left image. Images are VG. $250

     
CW714.
Negative by Brady & Co. E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. This view has the incorrect label of view No. 2494. This is actually No. 2495. 13th NY Artillery Winter Quarters, Petersburg, Va. VG. $250

     
CW715.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 3399. Lieut. Gen. Grant, Wife and Son, at his Head Quarters, City Point, Va. G+. $375

     
CW716.
The War Photograph & Exhibition Company. Photographic History The War for the Union. 730. General Grant’s Council of War. This view shows a “Council of War” in the field near Massaponax Church, Va., May 21, 1864. The pews or benches have been brought out under the trees, and the officers are gathered to discuss the situation. It has been a disastrous day for the Union troops; the losses have been heavy, and nothing apparently gained. General Grant is bending over the bench looking over General Meade’s shoulder at a map which is held in Meade’s lap. The Staff Officers are grouped around under the trees; the orderlies are seen in the background; the ambulances and baggage wagons can also be seen in the background. VG. $1200

  
CW718.
The War Photograph & Exhibition Company, Hartford, Conn. The War For the Union. 2508. Burial of the Dead. After the battle the dead are gathered and buried. Sometimes pine boxes were procured and single graves were made, with a head-board giving the name, company, and regiment, if it could be ascertained. This view was at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 15, 1862, and shows burial detail employed in burying the Union dead. This burial detail is under a flag of truce, as the Rebels hold this field. VG. $275

     
CW724.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 940. The Viaduct at the Relay House, on the Balt. and Ohio Rail Road. VG. $125

     
CW726.
Negative by James F. Gibson for Gardner’s Gallery, Wash, DC. Photographic Incidents of the War. No. 356. Group, Duc de Chartres and Friends, Camp Winfield Scott, Near Yorktown, May 3, 1862. Looks like they are playing dominoes. Spot on lower left image. G. $500

     
CW738.
Negative by Brady & Co. Published by E&HT Anthony. The War for the Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 3333. Gen. Ferrero and Staff, Petersburgh, Va. VG. $375

     
CW740.
E&HT Anthony. The War for the Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 2694. Capt. Pierce and Officers 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery, near Petersburgh. G. $350

     
CW743.
E&HT Anthony. The War for the Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 3182. Southern Soldiers, killed in the Trenches of Ft. Mahone, called by the Soldiers Ft. Damnation. This view shows the construction of the bombproofs and covered passages which branch off in every direction. VG. $350

     
CW744.
[Brady]. John C. Taylor. The War for the Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 3198. Confederate prisoners on their way to the rear under guard. These prisoners were captured by Gen. Sheridan at Five Forks, Va., April 2, 1865.

     
CW746.
E&HT Anthony. Prominent Portraits. No. 2118. Com. John Rogers, U.S.N. VG. $450

     
CW748.
E&HT Anthony. Prominent Portraits. No. 3891. Maj. Gen. Jeff. C. Davis. VG. $650

  
CW750.
The War Photograph & Exhibition Company. The War for the Union. 431. A Battery of “Flying Artillery.” Flying Artillery, as it is sometimes called, is a battery of light artillery (usually 10-pounder rifle guns), with all hands mounted. In ordinary light artillery the cannoneers either ride on the gun-carriage or go afoot. In flying artillery each cannoneer has a horse. This permits very rapid movements of the battery. Flying artillery usually serves with cavalry. This is Gibson’s battery )”C,” 3d U.S.) near Fair Oaks, June, 1862. VG. $250


CW752.
Taylor & Huntington. The War for the Union Photographic War History. 3405. The Chair Lincoln sat in when he was Shot. This easy chair was placed in the private box in Ford’s Theater, Washington, specially for the use of President Lincoln, who, after the wearisome toil of the day liked to rest himself and for the time forget the cares of State by watching the play at the theater. It was while sitting in this chair on the evening of April 14, 1865, that the cowardly assassin sneaked into the private box and creeping up behind the noble Lincoln, fired the fatal shot. VG. $395

     
CW756.
E&HT Anthony. War Views-Army of the Potomac. No. 2061. Picket Guard on the Alert. VG. $375


CW762.
J. Gurney & Son, NY. General Ulysses S. Grant. VG. $500

     
CW763.
McCullum & Butterworth, Boston. Bull Run Monuments. No. 1. Gathering of Generals at Bull Run Monument. This was taken on June 10, 1865 during the dedication ceremony of the Bull Run Monument. Can anyone identify the individuals in the image? VG. $200

     
CW764.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 3663. Fortifications and Bombproofs, Atlanta, GA. VG. $200

     
CW767.
John C. Taylor. Photographic History The War for the Union. No. 3181, pencilled over on back to 6181. Confederate artillery soldiers killed at Petersburgh April 2, 1865. Their uniform is gray cloth trimmed with red. The one in the foreground has on U.S. belts, doubtless taken from some federal prisoner. VG. $325

     
CW769.
Alexandre Pouget, Cap Haytien. Officers of U.S.S. Rhode Island. Manuscript title on verso. This is the first U.S.S. Rhode Island. It was a side-wheel steamer in the US Navy, commissioned in 1861. Built at New York, NY in 1860 by Lupton & McDermut, named John P. King, burned and rebuilt, renamed Eagle in 1861, purchased by the Navy 27 June 1861, renamed Rhode Island, Comdr. Stephen D. Trenchard in command. The Rhode Island was employed as a supply ship visiting various ports and ships with mail, paymasters officers stores, medicine and other supplies. Nevertheless the ship captured a chased a number of confederate vessels. The Rhode Island towed the Monitor from Hampton Roads, rounded Cape Hatteras and encountered a heavy storm. The Monitor sank taking four officers and 12 enlisted men with her. E. $350

     
CW770.
E&HT Anthony. Prominent Portraits. No. 3878. Lieut. Gen’l Ulysses S. Grant, Com. in Chief Armies of U.S. G. $375

     
CW783.
Negative by Brady & Co. Published by E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 3387. Col. Ord, at the mansion formerly occupied by Jeff Davis, Richmond, Va. In the doorway is the table upon which the surrender of Gen. Lee was signed. VG. $225

     
CW786.
Negative by Brady & Co. Published by E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 2450. View of City Point, Va., showing barges, transports, &c. G+. $175

     
CW787.
Negative by Brady & Co. Published by E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 2507. Wounded at Fredericksburgh, Va. VG. $250

  
CW792.
No ID. I believe this is by Brady, from the series Illustrations of Camp Life taken around Washington DC in 1861. This is a label along the bottom of the view that reads “Group of Confederate Soldiers” but this is clearly not the case. There is some old writing in pencil on verso which says “Group of ?? Soldiers.” Various pistols, swords, rifles are visible. The sign on the tent reads “N.C.O. L.L. 1?” Tinted. G. $695

  
CW793.
No ID. I believe this is by Brady, from the series Illustrations of Camp Life taken around Washington DC in 1861. This is a label along the bottom of the view that reads “Two of Gen. Siegel’s Staff.” On back in pencil is written “Two of Gen. Seagal Staf.” Standing soldier has a pistol in his belt, both have swords. Tinted. VG. $695

     
CW794.
James. F. Gibson for Gardner’s Gallery, Wash DC. Photographic Incidents of the War. No. 441. Gen. Caldwell and Staff, at Fair Oaks, June, 1862. The man standing at the rear left is Nelson Miles (1839-1925). Miles had an extraordinary career in service to the nation. Here are some of the particulars:

Miles was born in Westminster, Massachusetts, on his family’s farm. He worked in Boston and attended night school, read military history, and mastered military principles and techniques, including battle drills.
Civil War: Miles was working as a crockery store clerk in Boston when the Civil War began. He entered the Union Army on September 9, 1861, as a volunteer and fought in many crucial battles. He became a lieutenant in the 22nd Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, and was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the 61st New York Infantry Regiment on May 31, 1862. He was promoted to colonel after the Battle of Antietam. Other battles he participated in include Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and the Appomattox Campaign. Wounded four times in battle (he was shot in the neck and abdomen at Chancellorsville), he received a brevet of brigadier general of volunteers and was awarded the Medal of Honor for gallantry, both in recognition for his actions at Chancellorsville. He was advanced to full rank on May 12, 1864, for the Battles of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania Court House, eventually becoming a major general of volunteers at age 26.

Indian Wars: In July 1866, Miles was appointed a colonel in the regular army, and in March 1869 became commander of the 5th U.S. Infantry Regiment. On June 30, 1868, he married Mary Hoyt Sherman (daughter of Hoyt Sherman, a niece of William T. Sherman and John Sherman, and a granddaughter of Charles R. Sherman).

Miles played a leading role in nearly all of the Army’s campaigns against the tribes of the Great Plains. In 1874-1875, he was a field commander in the force that defeated the Kiowa, Comanche, and the Southern Cheyenne along the Red River. Between 1876 and 1877, he participated in the campaign that scoured the Northern Plains after Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer‘s defeat at the Battle of Little Big Horn, forcing the Lakota and their allies onto reservations. In the winter of 1877, he drove his troops on a forced march across Montana and intercepted the Nez Perce band led by Chief Joseph that had defeated or eluded every unit sent against it over a 1,500 mile stretch from Oregon to the Canadian border. For the rest of Miles’ career, he would quarrel with General Oliver O. Howard over the credit for Joseph’s capture.

In 1886, he replaced General George Crook as Army Commander against Geronimo in Arizona. Crook relied heavily on Apache scouts in his efforts to capture the Chiricahua leader. Instead, Miles relied on white troops, who eventually traveled 3,000 miles tracking Geronimo through the tortuous Sierra Madre Mountains without success. Finally, First Lieutenant Charles B. Gatewood, who had studied Apache ways, succeeded in negotiating a surrender, under the terms of which Geronimo and his followers were exiled to confinement on a Florida reservation along with all other Chiricahuas who had worked for the army, in violation of Miles’ agreement with them. Miles denied Gatewood any credit for the negotiations and had him transferred to the Dakota Territory.

In 1890, the last uprising of the Sioux, known as the Ghost Dance, on the Lakota reservations brought Miles back into the field once more. His efforts to subdue them once more led to Sitting Bull‘s death and the massacre of 200 Sioux, which included women and children at Wounded Knee on December 29, 1890. Miles reacted to these fights by asserting U.S. authority over the Indians, believing that all Lakota should be placed under military control.

Spanish-American War and later life: In 1894, Miles commanded the troops mobilized to put down the Pullman strike riots. He was named Commanding General of the U.S. Army in 1895, a post he held during the Spanish-American War. Miles commanded forces at Cuban sites such as Siboney, and after the surrender of Santiago de Cuba by the Spanish, he personally led the invasion of Puerto Rico, landing in Guánica. Miles was a vocal critic of the army’s quartermaster for providing rancid canned meat to the troops in the field. He served as the first head of the military government established on the island, acting as both head of the army of occupation and administrator of civil affairs. He achieved the rank of Lieutenant General in 1900 based on his performance in the war. Called a “brave peacock” by President Theodore Roosevelt, Miles retired from the service in 1903 when he reached retirement age. Upon his retirement, the office of Commanding General of the U.S. Army was abolished by an Act of Congress and the Army Chief of Staff system was introduced.

Under the law at that time, only one person at a time was authorized to wear and hold the rank of lieutenant general, which was then the highest rank an officer could hold. President Theodore Roosevelt, anxious to rid himself of Miles (they detested one another), swore in General Samuel B. Young as the first Army Chief of Staff on the very last day of Miles’ tenure of office. For approximately a period of an hour, the United States had (illegally) two men as lieutenant generals serving on active duty. This was remedied when Miles was notified of his retirement by way of bicycle messenger and escorted out of his office to make way for the new Army Chief of Staff.

Miles served as a commander in the Civil War, the Indian Wars, and the Spanish-American War. In his late 70s, he volunteered to serve in the army during World War I as well, but was turned down by President Woodrow Wilson due to his age at that time. Perhaps fittingly, Wilson also turned down the request of one of Miles’ biggest critics—Teddy Roosevelt—to serve in the European conflict.

Miles died May 15, 1925 at age 85 from a heart attack while taking his grandchildren to the circus in Washington, DC. He was buried at Arlington National Cemetery in the Miles Mausoleum. It is one of only two mausoleums located within the confines of the cemetery.

View has writing across bottom as shown. Slightly trimmed at sides. G. $850

     
CW795.
James. F. Gibson for Gardner’s Gallery, Wash DC. Photographic Incidents of the War. No. 445. Gen. Stoneman and Staff, near Richmond, June, 1862. Writing along bottom, slightly trimmed at sides. G. $650

     
CW804.
G.N. Barnard for Gardner’s Gallery, Wash DC. Photographic Incidents of the War. No. 468. Savage Station, on the Richmond and York River Railroad, Headquarters Gen’l McClellan, 27th June, 1862. Slightly trimmed at sides. G. $300

     
CW810.
[James. F. Gibson]. Gardner’s Gallery, Wash DC. Photographic Incidents of the War. No. 432. Gibson and Staff. Capt. Horatio Gibson, 2nd from left & Officers of his Horse Artillery Battery, Fair Oaks, Va., June 1862. No label. Old strip label beneath image “Sumner’s Corps.” Slightly trimmed at sides. G. $600

     
CW814.
Negative by Brady & Co., Published by E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 2342. Wounded Indians. Trimmed. VG. $350

     
CW815.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 3626. Maj. Gen. Sherman and Staff. This View was taken in the Trenches before Atlanta, Ga. VG. $475

     
CW820.
Alexander Gardner. Photographic Incidents of the War. No. 658. Ruins of Bridge Across the Potomac, at Berlin, Destroyed by the Confederates, June, 1861. VG. $350

     
CW828.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 3179. A Dead Rebel soldier, as he lay in the Trenches of Fort Mahone, called by the soldiers “Fort Damnation.” This view was taken the morning after the storming of Petersburgh, Va., April 2d, 1865. VG. $250

     
CW829.
Anderson’s Stereoscopic Views of Virginia. Jeff Davis Mansion. This is yet a different view from the others offered on this site. VG. $125

  
CW830.
[E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views.] Not labeled as such but definitely from the War Views series. Troops Entering Petersburg, Apr. 2, 1865. For some reason the view is mounted on a Fred C. Low, East Cambridge, Mass. mount. Low was a New England photographer working out of Bangor Maine and in Massachusetts. He must have obtained some prints of Civil War images and mounted them on his mount. VG. $250

     
CW834.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 3183. This Picture is a good view of the covered ways inside the Rebel Fort Mahone, called by the soldiers “Fort Damnation.” The Union soldiers had to charge up and down the obstructions. In the foreground centre is a dead rebel soldier sticking out through the debris, and further on lies another Confederate soldier. VG. $285

     
CW835.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 2527. Hide and Fat Depot, for the Government, Cedar Level, Va. VG. $175

     
CW836.
Negative by Brady & Co. Published by E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 2453. The James River at City Point, Va. VG. $185

     
CW846.
Negative by Brady & Co. Published by E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 2438. Gen. Custer at his Head Quarters in the field, Army of the Potomac, Va. Brigadier General Custer is pictured on or about July 11, 1864. Other than several negative flaws in dark area, view is VG. $2000

     
CW854. E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 2173. Col. Aspinwall. Taken at Harper’s Ferry. Tinted. VG. $400

     
CW855.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 2521. Cavalry Quarters, City Point, Va. VG. $150

     
CW861.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 2676. Group of Scouts, City Point, Va. VG. $300

     
CW864.
Negative by Brady & Co. E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 2503. Signal Tower, Ceppe’s Hill, James River. VG. $135

     
CW865.
Negative by Brady & Co. E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 2337. Howe Hospital, formerly Lafayette’s Head Quarters, Va. VG. $135

     
CW869.
Negative by Brady & Co. E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 2499. The 5th Penn. Cavalry on the Battle Field of Oct. 29th, 1864, near Richmond, Va. VG. $250

     
CW871.
Negative by Brady & Co. E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 2377. Rebel Winter Quarters, near Yorktown, Va. VG. $225

     
CW873.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 3196. Soldiers’ Quarters in the Union Fort Rice adjoining Fort Sedgwick (“Fort Hell.) This view was taken the morning after the storming of Petersburgh, Va., April 2d, 1865. VG. $125

     
CW875.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 2615. View from the Point of Rocks, on the Appomattox River, Va., looking north-west. VG. $150

     
CW876.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 2520. Gen. Grant’s Rail Road at City Point, Va., looking South. VG. $150

     
CW878.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 3663. Fortifications and Bombproofs, Atlanta, Ga. VG. $150

     
CW879.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 4002. Interior view of Fort McAllister, Ga. 60 lb. Rifled Gun in the foreground. VG. $125

     
CW881.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 3660. Umbrella Rock, Lookout Mountain, Tenn. VG. $140

     
CW882.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 3560. Reservoir, Savannah, Ga. VG. $135


CW893.
[George Stacy]. Camp Scene at Fortress Monroe Va. G. $600


CW902.
Quinby & Co., Charleston, S.C. No. 43. Interior of Fort Moultrie, on Sullivan’s Island, Charleston Harbor. G. $150


CW910.
Taylor & Huntington, Hartford, Conn. Photographic War History. 918. Collecting Remains of the Dead. This is a ghastly view showing the process of collecting the remains of Union soldiers who were hastily buried at the time of the battle. This is a scene on the battlefield months after the battle, when the Government ordered the remains gathered for permanent burial. The grinning skulls, the boot still hanging on the fleshless bones, the old canteen on the skeleton, all testify to the hasty burial after the battle. Looking on this scene you can easily understand why, in all National Cemeteries, there are so great a number of graves marked “Unknown.” These are the “unknown” heroes of the war, who “died that our Nation might live.” VG. $325


CW912.
Negative by Brady & Co. Published by E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 2440. Gen. Wilcox and Staff in the field, Army of the Potomac, Va. G. $275


CW913.
E&HT Anthony. Prominent Portraits. No. 2105. Major General John A. Dix. Tinted. G. $175


CW914.
E&HT Anthony. Prominent Portraits. No. 2102. Maj. Gen. W.S. Rosencrans. Tinted. G. $175


CW917.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 3154. Captured Brass Howitzer Guns at the Rocketts, Richmond, Va. VG. $185


CW918.
John C. Taylor, Hartford, Conn. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 51. Signal Station on board the U.S. Steamer Vermont. This view shows the deck of the steamer with the signal officer standing near his spy glass, and on either side of him are his signal men with their flags ready to send or receive a message from land, or from other vessels on the blockade. VG. $400


CW921.
Published by E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 3533. View at Ft. Sumpter, Charleston, S.C., on the occasion of the raising of the old Flag. Rev. Henry Ward Beecher delivering the oration. VG. $150


CW922.
Published by E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 3191. A Rebel Soldier, killed at the Trenches before Petersburgh. The spots and marks on his face, are blood issuing from his mouth and nose. The wound is in the head caused by a fragment of shell. View taken the morning after the storming of Petersburgh, Va., April 2d, 1865. G. $275


CW923.
Published by E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 3611. Gen. Sherman’s soldiers tearing up the railroad, before leaving Atlanta, Ga. VG. $325


CW946.
Taylor & Huntington, Hartford, Conn. 619. A Cavalry Orderly. One morning in October, 1862, our photographer was approached by a cavalry orderly with the request: “Can you make a picture of my horse this morning?” The photographer accommodated the soldier, and this is the view of one of those very useful soldiers, the Cavalry Orderly or bearer of dispatches. VG. $300


CW947.
The War Photograph & Exhibition Company, Hartford, Conn. 2351. Field Telegraph Station. It was often necessary to establish a telegraph service between different points in our lines very hurriedly. This view shows one of the characteristic field telegraph stations. An old piece of canvas stretched over some rails forms the telegrapher’s office, and a hard-tack box is his telegraph table; but from such a rude station messages were often sent which involved the lives of hundreds and thousands of soldiers. VG. $300


CW950. Negative by Brady & Co., Washington. Published by E&HT Anthony. The War for the Union Photographic History. War Views. No. 2398. All the live stock on Mr. Gill’s plantation after the Battle of Gettysburg. G. $175


CW951.
E&HT Anthony. Prominent Portraits. No. 2965. Gen’l Ulysses S. Grant, Com. in Chief Armies of the US. VG. $750


CW952.
J. Gurney & Son, NY. Gen’l Ulysses S. Grant. VG. $450


CW956.
E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. 2596. Soldier’s Winter Quarters, inside the first line of fortifications, City Point, Va. Paper adhesions on back of card. G. $150


CW960.
E&HT Anthony. War Views. No. 1493. Camp Life. Uncommon view in this series. G+. $375

Camp Life Army of the Potomac Camp Life Army of the Potomac label
CW967. E&HT Anthony. War Views. Army of the Potomac. No. 1510. Camp Life.–Ready to Start. VG. $225

Levee at Vicksburg Mississippi 1864 Levee at Vicksburg Mississippi 1864
CW969. The War Photograph & Exhibition Company, Hartford, Conn. The War for the Union. Photographic War History. 391. The Levee at Vicksburg, Miss., February, 1864. E. $125

Lord Abbinger and Friends at Hdqrts, Falmounth April 1863 Lord Abbinger and Friends at Hdqrts, Falmounth April 1863
CW984. Negative by James F. Gibson for Gardner’s Gallery, Washington, DC. Photographic Incidents of the War. No. 695. Group Lord Abbinger and Friends at Headquarters Army Potomac, Falmouth, April, 1863. 3-cent tax stamp on verso. G. $400

General Stoneman and Staff, Fair Oaks General Stoneman and Staff, Fair Oaks
CW985. Negative by James F. Gibson for Gardner’s Gallery, Washington, DC. Photographic Incidents of the War. No. 436. Gen. Stoneman and Staff at his Headquarters, near Fair Oaks. 3-cent tax stamp on verso. VG-. $600

Rear Admiral W.D. Porter, U.S.N. Rear Admiral W.D. Porter, U.S.N.
CW987. E&HT Anthony. Prominent Portraits. No. 2100. Rear Admiral W.D. Porter, U.S.N. VG. $500

Mrs. Lincoln, Wife of President Lincoln Mrs. Lincoln, Wife of President Lincoln
CW988. E&HT Anthony. Prominent Portraits. No. 2970. Mrs. Lincoln, Wife of President Lincoln. 3-cent cancelled tax stamp on verso. VG. $1500

Dead on the Antietam Battlefield Dead on the Antietam Battlefield
CW989. Taylor & Huntington, Hartford, Conn. The War For The Union. Photographic War History. 560. On the Antietam Battlefield. This is a view on the west side of the Hagerstown Road. The bodies of the dead which are strewn thickly beside the fence, just as they fell, shows that the fighting was severe at this point on that bloody day, September 17, 1862. G. $350

Destruction of Chambersburg, Mrs. Hanson E. Weaver Collection  Destruction of Chambersburg, Mrs. Hanson E. Weaver Collection
CW992. Charles E. Meyer, Philadelphia. Published by R. Newell. Chambersburg, Franklin Co., Pa., Destroyed by the Rebels under McCausland, July 30th, 1864. General View. Meyer’s 1864 copyright line on verso. This view has been signed “Hanson E. Weaver, US Army,” and has the label “No. 541 Stereoscopic Collection of Mrs. Hanson E. Weaver.” Hanson Weaver probably purchased this view when it became available for sale and either brought it or sent it home to become part of his wife’s extensive collection of views. Hanson Weaver was a cousin of Peter S. Weaver who operated a photography gallery in Hanover Pa. and his uncle was Samuel Weaver who established the first permanent photography gallery in Gettysburg in 1852. Peter and his staff produced a series of views of the Gettysburg battlefield. Hanson joined his cousin as a photographer in 1866. I refer the interested reader to a chapter on the Weavers in Early Photography at Gettysburg by William A. Frassanito. In addition, there are some manuscript numbers on the back of the view (No. 81 and No. 1) whose meaning is a mystery at this time. Charles Meyer operated as a photographer for one year only, 1864, and was located at 722 Arch St., Philadelphia, immediately adjacent to the 724 Arch St. location of the publisher, R. Newell. This leads to speculation that Meyer may have been working for Newell at this time. As far as I am aware the Chambersburg views are the only images attributed to Meyer. E. $450

Destruction of Chambersburg, Mrs. Hanson E. Weaver Collection  Destruction of Chambersburg, Mrs. Hanson E. Weaver Collection
CW993. Charles E. Meyer, Philadelphia. Published by R. Newell. Chambersburg, Franklin Co., Pa., Destroyed by the Rebels under McCausland, July 30th, 1864. Main Street-Looking West.  Meyer’s 1864 copyright line on verso. This view has been signed “Hanson E. Weaver, US Army,” and has the label “No. 542 Stereoscopic Collection of Mrs. Hanson E. Weaver.” Hanson Weaver probably purchased this view when it became available for sale and either brought it or sent it home to become part of his wife’s extensive collection of views. Hanson Weaver was a cousin of Peter S. Weaver who operated a photography gallery in Hanover Pa. and his uncle was Samuel Weaver who established the first permanent photography gallery in Gettysburg in 1852. Peter and his staff produced a series of views of the Gettysburg battlefield. Hanson joined his cousin as a photographer in 1866. I refer the interested reader to a chapter on the Weavers in Early Photography at Gettysburg by William A. Frassanito. In addition, there are some manuscript numbers on the back of the view (No. 82 and No. 2) whose meaning is a mystery at this time. Charles Meyer operated as a photographer for one year only, 1864, and was located at 722 Arch St., Philadelphia, immediately adjacent to the 724 Arch St. location of the publisher, R. Newell. This leads to speculation that Meyer may have been working for Newell at this time. As far as I am aware the Chambersburg views are the only images attributed to Meyer. E. $475

Destruction of Chambersburg, Mrs. Hanson E. Weaver Collection  Destruction of Chambersburg, Mrs. Hanson E. Weaver Collection
CW995. Charles E. Meyer, Philadelphia. Published by R. Newell. Chambersburg, Franklin Co., Pa., Destroyed by the Rebels under McCausland, July 30th, 1864. North-West Corner Public Square. Oldest Stone House in the Town. Court was formerly held here. Meyer’s 1864 copyright line on verso. This view has been signed “Hanson E. Weaver, US Army,” and has the label “No. 544 Stereoscopic Collection of Mrs. Hanson E. Weaver.” Hanson Weaver probably purchased this view when it became available for sale and either brought it or sent it home to become part of his wife’s extensive collection of views. Hanson Weaver was a cousin of Peter S. Weaver who operated a photography gallery in Hanover Pa. and his uncle was Samuel Weaver who established the first permanent photography gallery in Gettysburg in 1852. Peter and his staff produced a series of views of the Gettysburg battlefield. Hanson joined his cousin as a photographer in 1866. I refer the interested reader to a chapter on the Weavers in Early Photography at Gettysburg by William A. Frassanito. In addition, there are some manuscript numbers on the back of the view (No. 84 and No. 4) whose meaning is a mystery at this time. Charles Meyer operated as a photographer for one year only, 1864, and was located at 722 Arch St., Philadelphia, immediately adjacent to the 724 Arch St. location of the publisher, R. Newell. This leads to speculation that Meyer may have been working for Newell at this time. As far as I am aware the Chambersburg views are the only images attributed to Meyer. E. $450

Destruction of Chambersburg, Mrs. Hanson E. Weaver Collection  Destruction of Chambersburg, Mrs. Hanson E. Weaver Collection
CW997. Charles E. Meyer, Philadelphia. Published by R. Newell. Chambersburg, Franklin Co., Pa., Destroyed by the Rebels under McCausland, July 30th, 1864. Market Street Near Second-Looking South-West. Meyer’s 1864 copyright line on verso. This view has been signed “Hanson E. Weaver, US Army,” and has the label “No. 546 Stereoscopic Collection of Mrs. Hanson E. Weaver.” Hanson Weaver probably purchased this view when it became available for sale and either brought it or sent it home to become part of his wife’s extensive collection of views. Hanson Weaver was a cousin of Peter S. Weaver who operated a photography gallery in Hanover Pa. and his uncle was Samuel Weaver who established the first permanent photography gallery in Gettysburg in 1852. Peter and his staff produced a series of views of the Gettysburg battlefield. Hanson joined his cousin as a photographer in 1866. I refer the interested reader to a chapter on the Weavers in Early Photography at Gettysburg by William A. Frassanito. In addition, there are some manuscript numbers on the back of the view (No. 86 and No. 6) whose meaning is a mystery at this time. Charles Meyer operated as a photographer for one year only, 1864, and was located at 722 Arch St., Philadelphia, immediately adjacent to the 724 Arch St. location of the publisher, R. Newell. This leads to speculation that Meyer may have been working for Newell at this time. As far as I am aware the Chambersburg views are the only images attributed to Meyer. E. $450

Destruction of Chambersburg   Destruction of Chambersburg
CW998. No ID. Ruins of Chambersburg. Destroyed by McCausley, by order of General Early, July 30th, 1864. 9. Birds-eye View, looking North, Blue Mountains. All the labels from this series incorrectly name “McCausley” when it should be “McCausland.” VG. $325

Destruction of Chambersburg  Destruction of Chambersburg
CW1000. No ID. Ruins of Chambersburg. Destroyed by McCausley, by order of General Early, July 30th, 1864. 5. Court House, Main Street. All the labels from this series incorrectly name “McCausley” when it should be “McCausland.” VG. $325

Destruction of Chambersburg  Destruction of Chambersburg
CW1001. No ID. Ruins of Chambersburg. Destroyed by McCausley, by order of General Early, July 30th, 1864. 12. Main Street, from Diamond, looking West. All the labels from this series incorrectly name “McCausley” when it should be “McCausland.” VG. $300

Feats of the Chivalry-Destruction of Chambersburg  Feats of the Chivalry-Destruction of Chambersburg
CW1003. E&HT Anthony. Feats of the Chivalry-Destruction of Chambersburgh [sic]. No. 2018. General View from Market House, (looking North.) 2-cent, cancelled tax stamp on verso. G. $275

President Lincoln and General McClellan in Tent at Antietam  President Lincoln and General McClellan in Tent at Antietam
CW1004. Taylor & Huntington, Hartford, Conn. The War For The Union. Photographic War History. 602. President Lincoln and Gen. McClellan in McClellan’s Tent. After the battle of Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862, President Lincoln visited the Army of the Potomac, and this view shows the President and “Little Mac” in McClellan’s tent at Headquarters Army of the Potomac, Antietam, October 4, 1862. G. $2500

Gen. Lew Wallace  Gen. Lew Wallace
CW1007. Taylor & Huntington, Hartford, Conn. The War For The Union. Photographic War History. 2211. Gen. Lew Wallace. VG. $75

Winter Quarters of the Engineer Corps  Winter Quarters of the Engineer Corps  Winter Quarters of the Engineer Corps
CW1008. Taylor & Huntington, Hartford, Conn. The War For The Union. Photographic War History. 1047. Winter Quarters of the Engineer Corps. The Engineer Corps were made up of skilled mechanics, bridge builders, etc., etc., and their winter quarters on the lines before Petersburg during the winter of 1864-1865, made by far the handsomest, most attractive camp in the Army of the Potomac. This is a view of Colonel Spaulding’s quarters. Pine boughs have been interwoven into a handsome design for the front entrance. Over the entrance is the well-known Engineer Corps badge woven with the same material. Pieces of canvas are stretched over the ridge-pole, and this completes the Regimental Headquarters. Colonel Spaulding stands in the doorway. G. $150

Confederate Dead on the Battlefield  Confederate Dead on the Battlefield  Confederate Dead on the Battlefield
CW1009. Taylor & Huntington, Hartford, Conn. The War For The Union. Photographic War History. 725. Confederate Dead on the Battlefield. This view was taken near Spottsylvania Court House, May 12, 1864, after Ewell’s attack on the Federal right. The dead man is one of the Rebel General Ewell’s soldiers, just as he fell. There is very little of the “romance of war” to be found in such scenes as this; the fair face of nature is smeared and stained with the blood of the poor victims of war. Every rod of ground hereabouts has one or more dead soldiers laying on it. VG. $450

Entrance to Magazine Ft. Brady  Entrance to Magazine Ft. Brady  Entrance to Magazine Ft. Brady
CW1011. E&HT Anthony. The War For The Union. Photographic History. War Views. No. 2705. Entrance to Magazine, Ft. Brady, James River, Va. VG. $125

Encampment on the White House Grounds  Encampment on the White House Grounds  Encampment on the White House Grounds
CW1014. E&HT Anthony. Stereoscopic Views in Washington City, D.C. No. 1311. Encampment on the White House Grounds. 2-cent, cancelled tax stamp on verso. VG. $275

The Sally-port and Draw-bridge, Fort Marion  The Sally-port and Draw-bridge, Fort Marion  The Sally-port and Draw-bridge, Fort Marion
CW1017. No ID. The Sally-port, and Draw-bridge. Fort Marion, St. Augustine, Fla. VG. $225

Duryea's Zouaves at Fortress Monroe Virginia  Duryea's Zouaves at Fortress Monroe Virginia
CW1019. [George Stacy]. Duryea’s Zouaves at Fortress Monroe. No. 619. VG. $500

Viaduct on B & O RR  Viaduct on B & O RR
CW1022. No ID. Viaduct on the Baltimore & Ohio R.R. in possession of Federal troops. Along the bottom of the card there are small holes with thread weaved through them. VG. $375

Deck and Turret of Monitor Kaatskill  Deck and Turret of Monitor Kaatskill
CW1025. Negative by M.B. Brady, NY. Published by E&HT Anthony. Photographic History. The War For The Union. War Views. No. 3412. After Deck and Turret of Monitor Kaatskill. Taken at Charleston Harbor, S.C. G. $300

Major General Ord, Wife and Child  Major General Ord, Wife and Child
CW1026. Negative by Brady & Co., Washington DC. Published by E&HT Anthony. Photographic History. The War For The Union. War Views. No. 3384. Maj. Gen. Ord, Wife and Child, at the mansion formerly occupied by Jeff. Davis, Richmond, Va. In the doorway is the table upon which the surrender of Gen. Lee was signed. Remnants of tax stamp on verso. G. $275

Pontoon Boat on Wheels  Pontoon Boat on Wheels
CW1027. The War Photograph & Exhibition Company, Hartford, Conn. Photographic War History. The War For The Union. 2557. A Pontoon Boat on Wheels. This view shows two of the boats (of which the army bridge is made) on wheels ready for the march. Each pontoon wagon is drawn by six mules. These pontoons were always getting stuck in the mud, and the soldiers, struggling along under their own burdens, were obliged to haul on the drag ropes, and raise the blockade. Probably no soldier will see this view without being reminded of the time when he helped to pull these pontoons out of the mud, and comforted himself by swearing at the mules. VG. $75

Potter House, Rebel Lines at Atlanta  Potter House, Rebel Lines at Atlanta
CW1032. Taylor & Huntington, Hartford, Conn. Photographic War History. The War For The Union. 6717. On the Lines near Atlanta. This is the ‘Potter House’ on the Rebel lines near Atlanta. The sharpshooters of the enemy posted themselves in the upper rooms and on the roof of this house overlooking the Union lines, and thus greatly annoying our troops and killing many of our men, during the battle of July 22, 1864. Finally a battery of light artillery was brought up, and quickly made the house untenable for sharpshooters or anyone else. G. $75

Artillery Captured from the Rebels  Artillery Captured from the Rebels
CW1033. The War Photograph & Exhibition Company, Hartford, Conn. Photographic War History. The War For The Union. 6285. Artillery Captured from the Rebels. This entire park of artillery is made up of cannon and cassions captured from the Rebel army. It is parked near the Rocketts in Richmond and is waiting to be shipped North. Many of these same cannon have been used, since the war, in making the Grand Army Badges which are now worn by comrades of that great order. Good chance that the wagon at lower right is the photographer’s van. G. $125

Picket Station, Blackburn's Ford, Bull Run  Picket Station, Blackburn's Ford, Bull Run
CW1035. Taylor & Huntington, Hartford, Conn. Photographic War History. The War For The Union. 645. Picket Station, Blackburn’s Ford, Bull Run. This is a reserve picket station near Blackburn’s Ford, at Bull Run. The advance picket is stationed a short distance  beyond this reserve station. In case of an attack the advance pickets commence firing, and gradually fall back on the reserve; then the reserve all along the line form and oppose the advance of the enemy as much as possible, and if crowded back, they retire slowly, fighting as they go; this gives time for the army to form and be prepared to give battle. G. $150

Contrabands  Contrabands
CW1036. Taylor & Huntington, Hartford, Conn. Photographic War History. The War For The Union. 383. A Group of Contrabands. One of the common and characteristic scenes in the Union army during the war was a group of contrabands, happy and thankful if permitted to remain under the protection of “Massa Linkum’s Soldiers.” Here the photographer shows us such a group. (Yeah, I’d say they really look happy, wouldn’t you?). G. $450

Contrabands  Contrabands
CW1037. Taylor & Huntington, Hartford, Conn. Photographic War History. The War For The Union. A Group of Contrabands. The negroes who ran away from slavery and came into the Union lines, were employed by the Government as teamsters, laborers, &c. They were happy, good-natured fellows, and made lots of fun for the soldiers. This is a characteristic group of the “contrabands,” as they were called, standing in front of their rough-built shanty to have their pictures taken. G. $450

Non-commissioned Officers' Mess NY Infantry  Non-commissioned Officers' Mess NY Infantry
CW1038. The War Photograph & Exhibition Company, Hartford, Conn. Photographic War History. The War For The Union. 217. Non-commissioned Officers’ Mess, Co. D, 93d New York Infantry. This view was taken at Bealton, Va., in August, 1863, and if any of the members of this Company are now living they will doubtless appreciate the scene. VG. $275

Sally-port and Draw-bridge  Sally-port and Draw-bridge
CW1039. Taylor & Huntington, Hartford, Conn. Photographic War History. The War For The Union. 2318. The Sally-port and Draw-bridge. VG. $250

Embalming Surgeon at Work, Civil War  Embalming Surgeon at Work, Civil War
CW1040. Taylor & Huntington, Hartford, Conn. Photographic War History The War for the Union. 2531. Embalming Surgeon at Work. This view shows Dr. Burr, the embalming surgeon, engaged in the process of embalming a dead soldier. The veins are pumped full of some liquid, which possesses the power to arrest and prevent decay. Thus it was made possible to send to friends in the North the bodies of many hundreds of soldiers, which but for the science of embalming, could not have been permitted a grave in their native soil. VG+. $475

Prof. Lowe observing the Battle of Fair Oaks from His Balloon.  Prof. Lowe observing the Battle of Fair Oaks from His Balloon.
CW1041. Brady & Co., Washington, published by E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War For the Union. War Views. No. 2348. Prof. Lowe observing the Battle of Fair Oaks, Va. from his Balloon. VG. $495

Field Telegraph Battery by O'Sullivan/Gardner  Field Telegraph Battery by O'Sullivan/Gardner
CW1042. Negative by T.H. O’Sullivan for Gardner’s Gallery, Washington, DC. Photographic Incidents of the War. No. 786. Field Telegraph Battery Wagon and Officers Tent of Military Telegraph Corps-Headquarters Army of the Potomac, 24th June, 1864. Rare view. VG. $850

Sherman's Grand Army Sherman's Grand Army
CW1045. E&HT Anthony & Co. Photographic History. The War For the Union. No. 3319. Grand Review of the Great Veteran Armies of Grant and Sherman at Washington, on the 23d and 24th May, 1865. Sherman’s Grand Army. Looking up Pennsylvania Ave. from the Treasury Buildings, Maj. Gen. Logan and Staff and Army of Tennessee passing in Review. G. $125

President, Cabinet, Grant and Sherman Reviewing Stand President, Cabinet, Grant and Sherman Reviewing Stand
CW1046. E&HT Anthony & Co. Photographic History. The War For the Union. No. 3303. Grand Review of the Great Veteran Armies [of Grant and Sherman] at Washington, on the 23d and 24th May, 1865. The Army of the Potomac. The Stand in front of the President’s House occupied by the President and Cabinet, Grant and Sherman, and Reviewing Officers. Also written “May 23d.” VG. $275

Lieut. Gen. Grant at his Head Quarters Lieut. Gen. Grant at his Head Quarters
CW1047. Negative by Brady & Co., Washington. Published by E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War For the Union. War Views. No. 2427. Lieut. Gen. Grant at his Head Quarters, Va. The man at left adjusting the reflector is Mathew Brady. 2-cent cancelled tax stamp on verso. VG. $400

Slave Pen, Alexandria, Va. Slave Pen, Alexandria, Va.
CW1049. Negative by Brady & Co., Washington. Published by E&HT Anthony. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 2309. Slave Pen, Alexandria, Va. VG. $350

Refugees brought in by the Army Beaufort Refugees brought in by the Army Beaufort
CW1050. [Sam Cooley]. John C. Taylor. Photographic History The War for the Union. War Views. No. 37. Serving out rations to destitute Southern people. A characteristic scene. As the Union armies advanced into the South they found the people destitute, and the country devastated by war. Uncle Sam fed his rebellious children. This view shows the Southern ladies come with their slaves to draw rations from Uncle Sam’s Quartermaster. The artist entitles this picture “A Bitter Pill.”  The image is by Sam Cooley and the copy I have in my collection is titled in manuscript “Refugees brought in to Beaufort by the Army, S.C.” VG. $600

 

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